Blood Glucose Levels For Diabetes

DIABETES TESTING

Regular blood glucose testing by people with diabetes is important to help control it, and also prevent long-term complications. Good control of blood glucose levels can prevent or reduce serious complications.

Frequent testing can show how changes in diet, exercise, medications or weight are having an effect on a patient's diabetes.

Close monitoring of blood glucose levels allows control and timely intervention to prevent diabetic complications.

Why is testing important for diabetic patients?

Regular monitoring of blood sugar levels (blood glucose) gives valuable information as to whether the level is within the normal range.

If kept in control, this can delay the onset or development of long term diabetic complications, which can even be life-threatening.

People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes can monitor their blood sugar themselves, by using thumb prick blood tests which are available as home kits. Self-monitoring is very important for long-term health.

What are the routine tests that are followed?

Regular self testing, recording of blood glucose levels by thumb prick blood tests, laboratory test of HbA1c (glycosylated haemoglobin) level a few times a year should be taken.

Other tests that should be performed routinely include: urine test to monitor kidney function; blood fat levels (cholesterol & triglyceride levels), and tests for kidney function.

Regular blood pressure measurement and treatment if needed.

Examination of the feet is also necessary, as the patient may not be aware of loss of sensation from early nerve damage.

Also, get eyes tested every 1 to 2 years, depending on test results.

How is diabetes and pre-diabetes diagnosed?

The following test are the normal tests whoich are used for diagnosis:

1. Fasting plasma glucose test

This measures the blood glucose with a minimum gap of at least 8 hours without eating. It is best done on an empty stomach in the morning. This test is used to detect diabetes or pre-diabetes.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What method is for medium-term monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetes patients?
    Also Why is a method like this required in addition to Clinistix-type testing?

    • ANSWER:
      Blood testing. There's a blood test called an HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin [hemoglobin, if you prefer the American spelling] or glycosylated haemoglobin), or A1c, more commonly, that gives an average of what blood sugar (glucose) levels have been like over the previous 90 to 120 days (3 to 4 months).

      This type of test shows how much glucose is attached to red blood cells during their lifespan, which is approximately 90 to 120 days in length.

      This method is required because a Clinistix-type test, which tests the glucose content of urine, by the way, is a 'snapshot in time'. i.e. it shows what the glucose content was like approximately half an hour ago ... not as reliable as a fingerprick blood test, which shows what blood glucose levels are doing right there and then. (It takes approximately half an hour, or more, before blood glucose is filtered by the kidneys, and it's only when blood glucose levels are higher than about 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/l) that glucose is excreted in urine.)

  2. QUESTION:
    Blood glucose levels/concentration ?? diabetes help?!?!?
    My biology exam is next week and i still dont get how blood glucose concentration works??? Please help by explaining what happens!
    For example if a diabetes person was to eat bread, would her blood glucose concentration in her blood go higher or lower and why? is it because the starch in the bread turns into sugar? how does that make the blood glucose concentration higher?
    what IS blood glucose concentration or levels?
    thats how confused im am :(
    Please help!!!
    thankss

    • ANSWER:
      You're right! The starch turns into sugar :) Think of starch as a long chain of single glucose units rolled up into a ball. Enzymes in your digestive system break that chain down into glucose, which goes through the wall of your intestine and into the blood stream.

      Because digestion takes some time, eating bread will make your blood glucose go up slowly compared to eating candy. It gives your pancreas more time to make insulin to deal with all the glucose.

  3. QUESTION:
    what are the normal blood glucose levels for a person with diabetes mellitus type 1 & 2?
    normal blood glucose levels for an average perso n is approximately 90mg/100ml. can anyone tell me the BGL for a person with diabetes mellitus?

    • ANSWER:
      There are various methods to determine blood glucose level. Some tests give you accurate diagnosis of diabetes or pre-diabetes, while others will tell you how well you are managing your diabetes.

      Fasting Blood Sugar Test:
      Measures the blood sugar level after 8 hours fast or overnight. Normal fasting blood glucose level is less than 100mg/dl. If your fasting blood glucose level is from 100mg/dl to 125mg/dl then you will have impaired blood glucose level also known as Pre-Diabetes. If your blood glucose level is above 125mg/dl then your doctor will diagnose as a patient of diabetes. To confirm the diagnosis, your doctor may repeat the fasting blood glucose test on any other day. If you have blood glucose level of 126mg/dl or higher in two consecutive tests, then you may have diabetes. If you have blood glucose level greater than 200mg/dl and you have symptoms of diabetes like increased thirst or hunger, frequent urination, weight loss, blurred vision etc, then you may be diagnosed with diabetes mellitus without confirming it with second test.

      Random Blood Glucose Test:
      Random blood Glucose test gives your blood sugar at any time in a day. Normal random blood sugar level should be less than 200mg/dl. If your random blood glucose level is between 140mg/dl to 200mg/dl then you will have pre-diabetes.

      Oral glucose tolerance test
      This test measures your response to sugar. First we measure fasting blood glucose level, and then glucose solution is given, after that we measure blood glucose after 1 hour and 2hours. A normal blood glucose level after an oral glucose tolerance test is less than 140 mg/dL. Level between 140 mg/dL to 199 mg/dL suggests pre-diabetes. A blood glucose level of 200 mg/dL or higher two hours after you drink the glucose solution may suggest that you have diabetes mellitus.

      Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test
      This test is not for diagnosing diabetes, but it shows you how well you have controlled your sugar in last 2 or 3 months. Normal value is less than 7%, however if it is more than 7 then you and your doctor should think of changing your treatment of diabetes.

      Always Remember, your blood glucose measurement alone is not enough to differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Your doctor may do some other tests to find out which type of diabetes you have.

      That it , there the same.

  4. QUESTION:
    Diabetes and Blood Glucose Levels ?
    Hello ! Well, for school we're supposed to know about diabetes and glucose levels, but for some reason I don't understand how it works. ( i know, im kinda slow) So please, can somebody tell me how it works? What is the normal range of where your glucose level should be? What number is too high? Too low? (In Canadian numbers please) Thank you, thank you SOO much.

    • ANSWER:
      Canada and most of the rest of the world measures blood sugar in mmol/L, the U.S. uses mg/dl. You will know the difference because mg/dl has no decimal point and will use much higher numbers than mmol/L. For example, 5.5 mmol/L (Canada) is equal to 100 mg/dl (U.S.).

      Normal blood sugar for someone who does not have diabetes is between about 3.5 and 5.5 for fasting (before eating) and up to about 6.7 after eating -- sometimes as high as 7.8 if it's after a very high-carb meal.

      Someone is considered to have diabetes once their fasting blood sugar rises above 7.0 or once their blood sugar after eating rises to above 11.1. People who have lower numbers than that but still higher than normal are considered to have "pre-diabetes" and are at higher risk of developing diabetes.

      Too low is generally anything under 4.0 for people who have diabetes (due to the risk of dropping much lower very quickly), or below about 3.3 for people without diabetes.

  5. QUESTION:
    What happens to a person whose blood glucose levels are within normal range but is taking pills for diabetes?
    My brother was very heavy and his doctor prescribed medication for diabetes. He's lost about 80 pounds now and another doctor took a blood test and sid he's not diabetic, but my brother continues to take his medication. I'm worried.
    He was prescribed metformin 500mg 3 times a day.

    • ANSWER:
      What is the name of the medication your brother is taking for his diabetes. Just because his blood sugars have normalized doesn't mean he is no longer diabetic. Speak with his Dr's as he may be able to control his diabetes with diet alone. Take care, Donna Interesting since your brother has lost so much weight his Dr maybe able to gradually decrease the Metformin and observe his BS and see what happens. It is the HBA1C that Drs judge BS control. He should remain on the diet though. Don't be worried, Metformin does not cause hypoglycemia. I think it was a little premature of his Dr. to announce that he was "no longer diabetic as BS levels fluctuate all the time. Your brother will be predisposed to diabetes but he is doing great.

  6. QUESTION:
    Blood glucose level / diabetes query?
    I just got my results for a blood test that I had last week, I was tested for many things but everything came back fine apart from my glucose level which was 6.1
    The doctor now wants me to do a fasting blood test next week. What does a level like this mean? Am I at risk of developing diabetes? It does run in my family but I do not fit any of the other diabetes profiles as I eat very healthily (and i never eat sweet things or junk), I exercise most days, I'm below average weight for my height and I'm quite slender.
    I did go out and had a few alcoholic drinks the night before my blood test so could that have affected it? Therefore, as long as I don't do this for my next blood test it should be fine?

    • ANSWER:
      Was the test an A1c, a random blood sugar test or a fasting blood sugar test?

      An A1c is a three-month average of your blood sugar and wouldn't be affected by anything you'd done that morning or the evening before the test. An A1c of 6.1% is elevated and would indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes.

      A random blood sugar test (non-fasting) reading of 6.1 mmol/L can be normal, especially if you'd eaten within 4 hours of the test.

      A fasting test reading of 6.1 mmol/L is elevated, in pre-diabetic range.

      Alcohol wouldn't have affected you. Alcohol, if anything, lowers blood sugar. Sweetened alcoholic drinks can raise blood sugar because of all the sugars, but if you waited at least eight hours after your last drink before having your blood drawn, then your blood sugar should have been back to normal by then. A non-diabetic could drink ten sodas at 12 AM and be normal by 8 AM.

      One test is just one test, though - it's a snapshot in time. Diabetes is about a pattern of high blood sugar, so it's great that your doctor wants to check you again in another week to see if you're still elevated.

      I wish you all the best.

  7. QUESTION:
    Is there a diffrence in blood glucose levels from country to country?
    I seem to have been rated down 4 times in an question that I answered yesterday in relation to diabetes where the blood glucose level was in the high 200's. Maybe the levels are different for different countries. Is this the case? In Australia a normal blood suger is 4.5, not in the high 80' to 90's. Am I right or are other people making me out to be making up my information? The next answer to mine seems to on the same track as me.

    • ANSWER:
      Forget the ratings. They're meaningless. Just point people to the BGL converter here: http://www.brist.plus.com/convert.htm

      In the U.S. we use milligrams per deciliter. In the U.K. and Canada, they use millimoles per liter. They differ only by a factor of 18. Elsewhere, I have no idea.

      U.S. norm fasting: 70 to 110 mg/dl
      U.K. norm fasting: 3.9 to 6.1 mmol/l

      Read this:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose_tolerance_test
      Ignore those who are ignorant. I get that all the time.

  8. QUESTION:
    Should I use Bactine before test my blood glucose level (for diabetes)?
    I use a home blood glucose meter to monitor my diabetes. I read that I should wipe my finger with alcohol before sticking myself, in order to sterilize the area. I'd like to use Bactine instead because it would deaden the pain. Is there any reason that I shouldn't do that?

    • ANSWER:
      I test 4 times a day. The finger prick doesn't hurt much if any. Don't worry about it.

  9. QUESTION:
    Diabetes. What are the equivalent Blood Glucose Levels? American and British readings differ.?
    Some information on this site can be confusing or even alarming especially for those newly diagnosed with diabetes.
    e.g. British readings are given in mmol/l. with recommended levels of 4 to 6 before meals and not higher than 10 two hours after meals. What is the US equivalent? And which measurements do other counties use.
    Just for info, my sister has type 2, diagnosed 7 years ago and her daughter's partner has type 1, since childhood, and as a family we support each other a lot so we are fairly well informed from a UK viewpoint.
    My question was based on the observation of a younger member of the family who thought if someone was looking on YA for information they may get a bit of a shock, as she did, bless her, if not aware of the difference in measurements. So together we thought we'd find the answer and maybe help others at the same time.

    • ANSWER:
      There are 2 units that are used - mmol/l is used in the uk and I think Canada, and no doubt other places, the other is mg/dl as used in the US and other places. % is used for your HbA1c (long term blood sugar), and this is the same everywhere. Gangadhar is right - to change our units (mmol/l) to US mg/dl, multiply by 18; so in their units, blood sugar should be between 72 mg/dl (4.0mmol/l) and 162mg/dl (9.0mmol/l). Check out http://www.diabetesexplained.com/diabetic-conversions.html
      for more info.

      It is anoying that this difference occurs as it can be v confusing, I guess we just need to put up with them! It's important to understand the difference if you're going abroad incase you get sick while you're there, and always try to check insulin units if you use insulin too - some countries (mainly in poorer countries - not a prob to the us) use more diluted insulin. All this is just one of those things that seems amazingly bewildering when you're newly diagnosed but you pick up sometime along the way! The good news is that you don't really need to worry about it unless you're traveling abroad or looking on web sites like this one - also watch out for info aimed at type 1s and that aimed at type 2s - often difficult to tell apart and it can be confusing as what applies to one doesn't always apply to the other - v anoying at times!

      Hope that helps xx

  10. QUESTION:
    Concerned about diabetes/blood glucose level?
    Hi,
    I've never gotten tested for diabetes before but I am a nursing student, 21 years old active, not working out but I do walk a lot and I'm always on my feet and always going, I do eat poorly though since right after school I go straight to work I don't ever feel like making a healthy dinner. I ate about 45 minutes to an hour ago and I tested my blood glucose level with OneTouch Ultra and it came out as 169 mg/dL. I'm worried about it because other symptoms I have is constant thirst, no matter how much I drink I just can not quench it, my hands are constantly numb/tingly even when I'm in the process of using them (i.e. writing, picking things up) I'm constantly tired, even when I do get a good 8 hours of sleep and my vision goes blurry sometimes. I understand neither you or me can diagnose myself but I'm just asking for advice. I have no insurance and to be honest this scares the you know what out of me.

    Any information would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      169 mg/dL is elevated, as I'm sure you know. Most non-diabetics don't usually cross the 140 mg/dL threshold, even after a large meal high in carbohydrates. One isolated reading certainly isn't a definitive test, though. You would need to establish a pattern of high blood sugar and the best tool for that is the A1c, a three-month average of your blood sugar levels.

      Because you don't have insurance, you have a few options. You can look for a free diabetes screening in your area. Many drugstores like Walgreens offer them from time to time. Also, Wal-Mart sells a home A1c kit for . You prick your finger on a piece of paper and then mail the sample off in a prepaid envelope. The results take 1-2 weeks to receive. Although I have never used it, many diabetics I know have said that the results are very close to their laboratory results. This won't be a substitute for a diagnosis, but this A1c might be able to tell you whether you need to scrounge up the cash to see a doctor.

      Check out some community clinics in your area. As a nursing student, you probably don't earn very much and may be living off financial aid alone, so I imagine you would qualify.

      Best of luck to you.

  11. QUESTION:
    If you blood sugar levels are low for a long time can you get diabetes?
    If you have really low blood glucose levels, can you get type 1 or 2 diabetes?

    • ANSWER:
      Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease in which the body destroys its own insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells. It has absolutely NOTHING to do with non-diabetics, non-diabetic hypoglycemia, or type 2. It is not curable, as the cells in question have been destroyed. Type 1 diabetics ALL require insulin injections or use of an insulin pump or other subcutaneous delivery device.

      Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed by various tests indicating a persistently high blood sugar or impaired glucose tolerance. It is commonly, though not always, associated with obesity, and is a condition that can usually be eliminated / cured with medications, careful attention to diet, and exercise.

      Hypoglycemia CAN occur in non-diabetic individuals, but it is not diabetes. Causes vary. If the condition persists, the effects may be similar to what type 1 diabetics experience with low blood sugars. Some non-diabetic hypoglycemics appear to be "sensitive" to foods high in starch or sugar, and react as if their body "overproduces" insulin in response to the food, resulting in a low blood sugar. That's why it's important to distinguish the cause of hypoglycemia. In a type 1 diabetic, it's best to treat with glucose or some form of sugar. In non-diabetic hypoglycemics, you need to get your blood sugar up without aggravating your body's tendency to drop your sugar every time you eat.

      I'm not that familiar with this condition, but my father-in-law had it.

      I hope this helps.

  12. QUESTION:
    Is checking my blood glucose levels worth it just to know?
    I don't have diabetes but I have a home tester and was considering just for curiosity sake buying some strips and checking my glucose levels periodically and possibly seeing how certain meals/diets that vary on the glycemic index effect my blood sugar levels.

    I'm 24 and about 10lbs overweight (yes I exercise daily and don't eat junk food).
    i know i don't have diabetes. I'm on a seperate medication that increases my likely hood for insulin resistance.

    I run 5mi a day

    • ANSWER:
      If it will entertain you, go ahead. But I suspect that you won't understand the natural fluctuation of blood glucose levels, and you'll probably get yourself worried about whether your levels are OK. Or, you'll use the tests to somehow justify eating things that you shouldn't. This is common with public health screenings. Whatever you are testing for, you get people who have been told they have that problem, and they keep getting re-tested instead of doing something about it, hoping to find somone who will tell them that they don't have that problem.

      If you suspect that you do have diabetes, ask your doctor to test your A1c.

  13. QUESTION:
    Will my blood glucose level rise if i have Gemer(for diabetes 2) and Zinetac(for indigestion) together?
    I am a diabetic so i take Gemer regularly. Everytime i take Zinetac, my blood glucose level seems to rise!

    • ANSWER:
      ple avoid oil food so that u can gain helth.....
      al the best .
      be live a long days.

  14. QUESTION:
    What are normal blood glucose levels?
    What are normal glucose levels for a non diabetic teenage girl?
    How often should I test my levels?
    The doctors think that I may have diabetes.
    I live in Australia so please answer in mmol please.

    • ANSWER:
      Visit my blog site and print off the Blood Glucose Level chart. The chart relates the HbA1C and daily finger prick tests. The chart covers the full range of results and converts USA and Canadian measurements. Study the chart and discuss it with your doctor so the expected range for you condition can be explained to you.

      You should test at least daily. I test twice a day, morning and evening. This allows me to adjust my diet during the day to control my glucose level.

      Best Wishes.

  15. QUESTION:
    My Dad Has Type 2 Diabetes And His Blood Glucose Level is 24!?
    This seems really high to me although I don't know much about diabetes. I've heard that this is really high and it can cause him to go into a coma.Is this true? He's really stubborn and will not go to a doctor. Is there anything he can do to lower his sugar?
    Thanks so much for answering my question
    ~Jenn
    Sorry I forgot to mention that I am from Canada. The ranges are different here then in the US.

    • ANSWER:

  16. QUESTION:
    I thought I might have diabetes but my blood test in a general exam shows 72 mg glucose. Should I get tested?
    I thought I might have some symptoms of diabetes: frequent yeast infections, frequent fatigue, advanced gum disease even though my gum doctor thought I was too young for that, anemia, and sometimes I get very tired after eating. I took an online test which said I had high risk for diabetes even though I eat a very good (high vegtable, fiber) diet, exercise regularly and have a good weight. I never took the specific test for diabetes but is my regular blood glucose level of 72 too normal for me to bother getting the specific test to diagnose diabetes?

    • ANSWER:
      Get a hemo A1C. This will tell you how you have been doing for the last 6 months. If it is bad, you have it.

  17. QUESTION:
    Any experience with cats and raised blood glucose levels?
    My 14 1/2 year old neutered male cat had to go to the vets to get his teeth scaled. It's quite a long journey but doesn't usually bother him, so I was surprised he was shouting all the way - though realised why when he pooed himself (he'd obviously not had time for his usual morning outing before we had to leave). When I collected him, they said his blood glucose levels (which they check along with other things before giving anaesthetic) were very high, and although this can happen with stress, they said the level was even higher than they would expect with that. They suggested it could be diabetes and wanted me to let them have a urine sample from him. To do this I would have to shut him in a small room overnight which would stress him thoroughly (we live in a rural area where he's used to hunting - and likes to sleep on top of me when he's in overnight!). Is there a real risk? I am almost certain the problem was entirely stress-related. What would you advise?
    He isn't drinking more, hasn't lost weight, looks great. I know I could check the urine myself, but the issue is that to get a urine sample I would have to enclose him which would automatically stress him and raise the blood glucose levels! So it doesn't seem worth doing unless there are really good reasons to suppose it could be diabetes. Are there other symptoms to look for? And if he does have it and remains symptom-free, what are the dangers of leaving it untreated?
    Please, can I emphasise, HE IS NOT DRINKING MORE; HE DOES NOT SEEM ILL IN ANY WAY!!!

    • ANSWER:
      it is still possible he has diabetes here is some info which might help

      Diabetes mellitus strikes 1 in 400 cats and a similar number of dogs. Symptoms in dogs and cats are similar to those in humans. Generally, most dogs and about half of cats experience type-1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, rather than the type-2 that's now becoming common in obese humans. The condition is definitely treatable, and need not shorten the animal's life span or life quality. In cats, prompt effective treatment can even lead to diabetic remission, in which the cat no longer needs injected insulin. Untreated, the condition leads to blindness in dogs, increasingly weak legs in cats, and eventually malnutrition, ketoacidosis and/or dehydration, and death.

      Symptoms
      Cats and dogs will generally show a gradual onset of the disease over a few weeks, and it may escape notice for a while. The condition is unusual in animals less than 7 years old. The first obvious symptoms are a sudden weight loss or gain, accompanied by excessive drinking and urination. Appetite is suddenly either ravenous (up to 3 times normal) or absent. In dogs, the next symptom is vision problems and cataracts, while in cats the back legs will become weak and the gait may become stilted or wobbly. A quick test at this point can be done using keto/glucose strips (the same as used on the Atkins diet) with your pet. If the keto/glucose strips show glucose in the urine, diabetes is indicated. If a strip shows ketones in the urine, the pet should be brought to an emergency clinic right away.

      Watch for noticeable thinning of the skin and apparent fragility -- these are also serious and indicate that the pet is consuming all its body fat. Dehydration is also common by this point, and death can follow quickly.

      Treatment
      Diabetes can be treated but is life-threatening if left alone. Early diagnosis and treatment by a qualified veterinarian can help, not only in preventing nerve damage, but in some cases, in cats, can even lead to remission.[1][2]

      Diet
      Diet is a critical component of treatment, and is in many cases effective on its own. For example, a recent mini-study[3] showed that many diabetic cats stopped needing insulin after changing to a low-carbohydrate diet. The rationale is that a low-carb diet reduces the amount of insulin needed and keeps the variation in blood sugar low and easier to predict. Also, fats and proteins are, in dogs and perhaps cats, turned into blood glucose much more slowly and evenly than carbohydrates, reducing blood-sugar highs right after mealtimes.

      Latest veterinary good practise is to recommend a low-carb diet for cats, and a high-fiber, moderate-carb diet for dogs. In dogs another alternative is to feed a normal healthy diet but give mealtime insulin bolus supplements.

      It's now becoming clear that lower carbohydrate diets will significantly lower insulin requirements for diabetic cats. Carbohydrate levels are highest in dry cat foods (even the expensive prescription types) so cats are best off usually with a low-carb healthy canned diet. Some prescription canned foods made for diabetic cats are effective, but some ordinary ones work just as well. Between 3 and 9% calories from carbohydrates seems to be optimal. These lists of common commercial cat foods and their carbohydrate energy content are kept up-to date.

      Pills
      Oral medications like Glipizide that stimulate the pancreas promoting insulin release, (or in some cases, reduce glucose production) work in some small proportion of cats (Most dogs are Type I diabetics so oral hypoglycemic drugs are usually not prescribed for them), but these drugs may be completely ineffective if the pancreas is not working. Worse, these drugs have been shown in some studies[4] to damage the pancreas further, reducing the chances of remission for cats. They have also been shown to cause liver damage. Many are reluctant to switch from pills to insulin injections, but the fear is unjustified; the difference in cost and convenience is minor, (many cats are easier to inject than to pill!) and injections are more effective in almost all cases.

      Insulin injections
      Humans with Type-1 diabetes are often treated with a "basal plus bolus" method, where a long-acting insulin is injected once or twice daily to provide a "basal" insulin level, then shorter-acting insulin is used just before mealtimes. For cats and dogs a "basal" method is usually employed instead -- a single slow-acting dose, twice daily, attempts to keep the blood sugar within a recommended range for the entire day. In this case it's important for the pet to avoid large meals, since they can seriously affect the blood sugar. (Meals may also be timed to coincide with peak insulin activity.) Once-daily doses are not recommended for most cats, since insulin usually metabolizes faster in cats than in dogs or humans; an insulin brand that lasts 24 hours in people may only be good for about 12 in a cat.

      Cats and dogs may be treated with animal insulins (pork-based seems to work best in dogs, beef-based in cats), or with human synthetic insulins. The best choice of insulin brand and type varies between pets and may require some experimentation. One of the popular human synthetic insulins, Humulin N /Novolin N/ NPH, is reasonable for dogs, but is usually a poor choice for cats, since cats' metabolisms run about twice as fast. The Lente and Ultralente versions were therefore very popular for feline use until summer 2005, when Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk both discontinued them.

      Until the early 1990's, the most recommended type for pets was beef/pork-derived PZI, but that type was phased out over the 1990's and is now difficult to find in many countries. There are sources in the US and UK, and many vets are now starting to recommend them again for pets.

      Caninsulin [5], known in the USA as Vetsulin [6], made by Intervet [7] (owned by Akzo Nobel), is a brand of pork-based insulin, which is designed for cats and dogs, and is available both through veterinarians and pharmacies with a veterinarian's prescription, depending on the country [8]. Although not approved, Caninsulin can also used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in pet rabbits [9] and guinea pigs.

      Two new ultra-slow time-release synthetic human insulins are just becoming available in 2004 and 2005 for improving basal stability, generically known as Insulin Detemir ("Levemir")[10] and Insulin Glargine ("Lantus"). A mini-study at the University of Brisbane, Australia[11] has had remarkable results with Insulin Glargine in cats. No studies have yet been performed on pets with Detemir/Levemir, but early anecdotal evidence[12] shows that it is also very effective on cats.

  18. QUESTION:
    Would taking antibiotics or the sinus infection they were for cause blood glucose levels to be higher than?
    normal?
    We've also been dealing with a ton of stress due to illness and a death in the family...which may have added to it.
    I've had type 2 diabetes for 1.5 years and now that my sinus infection & the family member's illness is better & the stress is passing my glucose readings are almost normal again.

    I would appreciate any thoughts.

    Thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      Both infection/illness and stress can cause higher sugar levels. Whenever I'm sick I test much more frequently.

  19. QUESTION:
    My free diabetes screening revealed 94 mg/dl for fasting blood glucose level. Is that bad?
    I'm a 23 yr old male with some weight issues. I had the diabetes check yesterday morning, however, I'm never hungry in the mornings, and my blood sugar usually drops in the afternoons, evenings, and nights.

    However, I've been dealing with quite the opposite for the past several years- low blood sugar known as hypoglycemia. I read numerous studies and articles on it and knew that's what I had.

    • ANSWER:
      No, that's great. Fasting blood glucose should be between 70 and 100mg/dl. Your result is great.

      That indicates that you are not at risk for hyperglycemia, or diabetes.

      Hypoglycemia is defined as a glucose (or blood sugar) reading below 70mg/dl. This is likely what you would see on a meter if you were to test yourself when you feel lightheaded, dizzy, etc. in the afternoon, evening, and nights.

      Good luck in managing your hypoglycemia.

  20. QUESTION:
    17 weeks pregnant, Gestational Diabetes, Blood Levels dropped?!?
    I am 17 weeks pregnant with my second. My first I had Gestational Diabetes and with this one my glucose levels have already been on the higher end. Doc is pretty sure I will be Insulin dependant again at some point during this pregnancy. Yesterday and this morning, however, my blood sugar levels were all around the normal-low range (and I didn't change anything about what I would normally eat for the day). My before lunch reading was even borderline too low. My question is if this has happened to anyone else with GD, or if this could possibly be an early sign of a miscarrage? I haven't felt pregnant in a few weeks (mainly because my morning sickness has finally ended, hurrah!) Any stories, or insight would be much apreciated : ) Thank you in advanced : )

    • ANSWER:
      Glucose metabolism is a complex thing, especially during pregnancy. Blood sugar variation is a natural phenomenon, but it's the range of these sugars that are the important thing. Current guidelines suggest pregnant women should keep fasting sugars less than 5.9mmol/L and sugars 1 hour after eating less than 7.8mmol/L. As long as you're maintaining these levels, you're lowering the risk to your baby and yourself throughout this pregnancy.
      With regards to could this be a sign of early miscarriage, that's highly unlikely given that increased stresses to your body would typically raise blood sugars. Also, it's still early in your pregnancy, and you're more than likely to notice your sugars rising the later on in your gestation.

  21. QUESTION:
    Blood sugar levels of the pregnants with Gestational Diabetes?
    Hi,

    My wife recently diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes (GDM). Her 50gr glucose test came over 200 (3hr test supported first finding). She was put on a diet by her perinatalogist (high-risk pregnancy doc) about a week ago. However her fasting and 1hr after breakfast blood glucose levels (BGL) are still relatively high (fasting ~95, 1 hr after breakfast ~150). 1 hr after lunch and 1 hr after dinner levels are normal (both ~110). Her fasting BGL should be <90 and 1 hr after eating <140. So anybody has any idea how bad is 95 compared to a 90 limit and how bad is 150 compared to 140 limit? Will she need insulin? Any idea why her BGL is high in the morning? Any suggestion for us to get it lower in the morning only? Can anyone out there with GDM can tell us her levels so that we can compare? Are pills ok during pregnancy (I read at several places thay they are not, but some says ok).

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      From personal experience, the ranges that the doctor gives are concrete. For the baby's health, you need to make sure that her BGs stay within those ranges. Anything above or below can lead to problems, short and long term. Obviously the more time you spend outside the ranges, the worse it is.

      Second, if the doctor does eventually put her on insulin, she needs to get a pump. No doubt about it. The control offered by the pump is the best out there, and you will be able to customize the insulin given to the way her BGs are trending.

      Lastly, the other thing you may want to consider is a continuous glucose monitor like Medtronic's Guardian system. It will give you continuous readings of her BG and will alert you when she is going out side the ranges set by the MD. That way you dont have to worry, and she can easily control her glucose without much effort.

  22. QUESTION:
    My mom just discovered she has diabetes: Why are her glucose levels dropping so rapidly?
    When they did lab work on her blood, her levels were between 226 - 214. So they confirmed that she has diabetes. So we changed her diet and began working out frequently (walking at a slow pace & doing strength training). In a matter of a week with the medication (lowest dose) and dietary changes as well as our working out, her blood glucose has been for the past 2 days 149 (morning) 131 (night) 141 (morning) and 114 (last night). Why are the numbers dropping so rapidly? Is this bad? Does this have to do with hypoglycemia or is this normal? Even the diabetes counselor at the hospital was surprised.

    • ANSWER:
      This is a definitely a good sign. She's making positive changes and they're having a profound effect on her blood sugar levels. She's nowhere near hypoglycemia, usually defined as blood sugar below 70 mg/dL. Hopefully, her blood sugar will come down even more in the next few weeks and she may need to up her dosage slightly to do that if diet and exercise aren't enough. Ideally her fasting levels would be closer to her most recent night-time number of 114 mg/dL or even under 100 mg/dL. There's evidence that chronic levels over 140 mg/dL can contribute to organ damage, so as your mother continues to make progress, she should aim to stay under that threshold.

      There's no need for her to do this all overnight, though. When blood sugar drops too quickly, a person can feel hypoglycemic even when he's not. This happened to me right after my diagnosis. My blood sugar was in the 300s, much higher than your mother's. My doctor started me on a low dose of Metformin and sent me home without any information about diet. Like your mother, I decided to get serious right away, so I did some research and began low carbing. Within 5 days, my blood sugar after meals was only 150 mg/dL. I had cut my levels in half in a very short time just by eating right and going on walks. I felt unbelievably sick - dizzy and nauseous with panic attacks. Although I was not hypoglycemic, my body thought I was because it'd gotten used to the high blood sugar. Now I spend most of the time under 100 mg/dL and that feels perfectly normal to me. That's really the only problem with dropping blood sugar so fast. If your mother feels okay, then there's no reason to slow down the progress. Also, your mother has to let her body acclimate to the more normal levels because ultimately that's where she needs to be to avoid complications.

      I wouldn't say your mother is "normal" because a lot of doctors and diabetes educators don't expect much right away and send diabetics home without any real goals or advice. Your mother in that sense is extraordinary because she's already making so many improvement. I think that's wonderful and I hope she keeps it up!

  23. QUESTION:
    How many blood tests to diagnose diabetes?
    How many blood tests are needed to diagnose diabetes? I have recently had three fasting samples taken. The first two showed blood glucose levels in the diabetic range, 8.9 for the first and only just within the range for the second. The third was normal. My GP wrote 'no action' on this and so none was taken, but if only one fasting sample out of three was normal, might not this one sample be the 'glitch'?

    • ANSWER:
      If you are really concerned ask him if he could do a Hb1c test which shows the average blood glucose level over the last 2-3 months and a glucose tolerance test. But it might be that knowing your full medical history and of course he might have already done the first one I mentioned that he does not think you have diabetes. In the mean time try to drink plenty watch what you eat especially ADDED sugar(Not things like the sugar present in fruit etc) and fat and exercise more if possible.

  24. QUESTION:
    how would I be able to test the cholesterol, blood pressure, glucose levels, and triglyceride levels in mice?
    Its for science fair.

    for the glucose levels i could use a diabetes meter...correct? or would that be to large of a shot for a mouse?

    also, how would i deal with the issue of hair in the way for all of these blood tests?

    and mostly...how the heck do I get the blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in a tiny mouse????

    • ANSWER:
      Universities have ethics boards that have significant red tape before any animal testing/experiments can be done. I politely advise you to reconsider your experiment as you may have a negative experience if you have not done such procedures.

  25. QUESTION:
    What else besides diabetes would cause glucose to show up in urinalysis?
    My doc used urinalysis to diagnose a urinary tract infection and she mentioned that glucose was also present. I will go back for blood tests. I do have a family history of diabetes. So I borrowed my father's glucose meter and tested my blood --glucose level was only 99, which is not in the diabetic range.

    • ANSWER:
      The kidney infection (in fact, ANY infection) WILL cause you blood sugars to be high, and THAT could have caused the sugar to spill into your urine,

      This is NOT a problem -- UNLESS it continues after the kidney infection is healed.

      You doctor will do ANOTHER urine test before you are "released" as being "well",. IF the sugar STILL shows up then, you have other problems to look into.

  26. QUESTION:
    Do they periodically check toddlers blood glucose for diabetes?
    I was wondering if they periodically check blood sugar levels in toddlers. It never occurred to me that it might be possible my daughter could have diabetes. Her fasting levels are about 119-125 and her eating levels are about 170 to 260 being the highest. She doesn't drink soda or cool aid and usually drinks water or milk. I don't know whether children's sugar tend to run higher or whether they should be around the same. I have gestational diabetes and my grandfather had type II, but my daughter eats healthy and if anything has more trouble gaining weight than anything. I know part of the signs but she has seemed to always be hungry (since birth), never gained weight (She weighs 22 pounds at one month shy of two), and her attitude is sometimes very outspoken and cranky, (well, she is almost two and has always had a little bit of an attitude) and she has never really acted that differently than usual. She takes one to two naps and sleeps at night and in general is a very well behaved toddler. I talked to my mom (who was a registered nurse) about the sugar levels and she doesn't think I should be concerned. I'm calling a doctor tomorrow (but wont be able to schedule until Tuesday due to the fact that I have 3 appointments for my pregnancy tomorrow), but want to hear opinions about what anyone who has diabetes thinks. Even if your someone who knows about diabetes. I'm a little bit of a diabetic idiot (wonder whether they have diabetes for dummies) so don't know what normal ranges are. I only know that an adults fasting should be around 80 and about 120 or so for eating. I don't even know what the highest normal range is for an adult. Only that 80 and 120 are the round about normal ranges (I'm not even sure that is right). I was only diagnosed a week ago with gestational diabetes. Please don't say ask your doctor. I am taking her, but in the meantime I would like to know what the best thing to help maintain her sugars. I only give her Splenda when it comes to sweets. Do I need to get cherrios and throw away fruit loops? Can she have juice at all? I don't have things like cookies or anything at all. I have veggies, fruits and meats such as chicken and shrimp and lean lean beef.

    • ANSWER:
      No they don't check toddler's blood sugar on a regular basis. This is too much information for me to address all of it, so I'm going to just give you the basics. At that age it's most likely type 1 ... but with numbers that low you very likely have just caught it at the beginning. Take her to the doctor soon, it can get dangerous quickly.

      Type 1 diabetes does not have to do with weight or diet, and it is not your fault if your daughter has it. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease where the immune system attacks the cells that produce insulin until they don't work anymore. It's the same type of thing as an allergy, which is when the immune system attacks things that are harmless. Except this is much more serious, of course.

      And it has nothing to do with your gestational diabetes, or your grandpa's type 2. They are different diseases with different causes. The treatment is different too.

  27. QUESTION:
    Glucose testing for diabetes?
    Having blood glucose levels tested for diabetes starts by fasting for a certain number of hours. Next, you drink a sweet drink. After waiting a specified time, blood is removed and tested

    a) what is the purpose of fasting before you start?
    b) Does it matter how much of the drink you consume?
    c) Does it matter how long you wait before blood is removed?
    d) What results would you expect for a diabetic response?
    e) What results would you expect for a normal response?

    Please and thankyou :)

    • ANSWER:
      a) You fast before having your initial blood draw so that the laboratory has a baseline figure from which to compare further readings.

      b) Yes, it does matter. You need to drink all of the glucola, that sickly sweet drink that they offer you, as there's a measured amount of glucose present which gives them a basis on which to offer their views.

      c) Yes, it does matter how long you wait before having your blood drawn. You will have one blood draw prior to you drinking the glucola, and then have blood drawn at hourly intervals thereafter ... for the fixed amount of time that your doctor has decided would be the correct glucose intolerance test s/he wants you to complete.

      d) A diabetic response would give you higher than 'normal' blood glucose levels. In a non-diabetic, a fasting blood glucose level would be between the ranges of 70 and 99 mg/dL. Two hours post-prandial (after eating, or drinking in the case of the glucose tolerance test), and a non-diabetic's blood glucose would not normally rise above 140 mg/dL. I say normally as there are occasions when it might go higher, such as if you have an underlying infection, your are experiencing extreme stress, or you're taking certain medications which are known to cause a rise in blood glucose levels.

      e) A normal response would be within the limits of the last answer. i.e. fasting = 70-99 mg/dL. Two hours post-prandial = less than 140 mg/dL.

      P.S. The reason they test after one hour and then again after two hours is because by the two hour point a non-diabetic's blood glucose level would be expected to be back on it's way down to the 'normal' range.

      P.P.S. This same test is used to determine whether or not a pregnant woman has developed gestational diabetes. This condition often disappears when the pregnancy is over though there are some women who do remain diabetic. The reason it's such a 'big issue' is that having diabetes during pregnancy is considered a 'high risk' pregnancy as there are dangers to both the mother and the unborn child.

  28. QUESTION:
    Blood glucose levels jumping all over the place?
    Ok, for a while now ive been very paranoid about diabetes, i got a blood glucose meter and followed all the directions, and i have yet to eat anything today, i took my blood glucose and it was 100, i panicked and took it again on a different finger, and it was 119, i waited a minute and took it again and it was 105. whats the deal here, Can stress directly affect the result, since i was shaking all crazy while performing the test. I'm really freaking out.

    I'm generally healthy, no one else in my family really has diabetes, ive been having to pee a bit more frequently lately, but with no thirst, but i figured it was simply stress.

    • ANSWER:

  29. QUESTION:
    How dangerous is it for my blood glucose level to be in the 500's?
    I just at some pizza for dinner and haven't taken my insulin all day. I'm suffering from depression and it's hard for me to have the will to take my insulin when necessary as I am a type 1 diabetic and I just found out I have diabetes type 1 10 months ago and I'm 21 years old and devestated. I talked to my doctor about this depression I'm having and they want me to see a couselor. In the mean time, I'm supposed to eat healthy and take the insulin they have specified, but I'm having a hard time dealing with it. So, id my blood glucose levels are in the 500's....what could happen? I just took insulin to bring it down, but I need to know what to do right now.

    • ANSWER:
      just take your insulin and chat with someone who you trust and will do whats best for you until you can get some professional help and dont think that you are alone i have had type 1 for 22 years and some days i dont want to take my insulin either and get very depressed too but blood sugars in the 500's is serious and you should go to the ER if that cant happen watch your blood sugar very close if not for you then do it for your little one

  30. QUESTION:
    How do they test my blood for diabetes?
    Can they tell what your blood glucose level has been over the last weeks ect?

    • ANSWER:
      They can do a test called a HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin), my friend, that will give an average of your blood glucose level over the previous 3 months, but this won't give specific details of what your blood glucose level was a fortnight ago or 1 month ago. (The test reveals how much glucose is attached to the hemoglobin ... part of the red blood cells ... which have an average lifespan of approximately 120 days.)

  31. QUESTION:
    I have gestational diabetes. What should my blood glucose be THREE hours after a meal?
    I've been doing so well with this gestational diabetes diet that I've grown a little bored testing. But today (I'm 36 weeks and two days pregnant), I had a small lunch OUT at a restaurant, where I didn't really know exactly how many carbs I consumed. Probably too many carbs and not enough protein. My one-hour-post-lunch test is supposed to be less than 140, per my doctor, but it came back high: 159. Opps. So I had a bad lunch after all. But after two hours, I tested again, and it was 175! 120, I am told, is what the max should be after two hours. What should my level be after three hours? Everything I find online gives the levels for the three-hour glucose screening test. This is just a regular after-meal test, three hours later instead of one or two.

    I failed my glucose screening test primarily because my sugar after two hours went higher when it should have gone lower. But I don't want to have my afternoon snack before my blood sugar comes back to a level where it should.

    • ANSWER:
      Gestational diabetes is a form of Type II Noninsulin Dependent Diabetes, which is a risk factor for the development of diabetes in the nongestational state.

      Gestational diabetes is associated with a number of pregnancy and newborn problems and complications the most common being excess weight gain by the mother and the delivery of a newborn who is heavier/larger than would be otherwise expected.

      Your blood glucose level 3 or more hours after any meal should be close to that of a fasting level which is in the 75-125 mg/dl range. A single reading of 159 or even 175, if your other glucose readings are in the range I quoted, is not something to worry about. The effects of diabetes are due to prolonged exposure to elevated blood glucose levels.

      Review your dietary recommendations as your glucose level at any point in time is due to three factors:

      1. Your total recent caloric intake (not the proportions of carbohydrates, protein and fats).
      2. Your recent energy expenditure (exercise!).
      3. Any medication you may have taken for diabetes.

      While overall the proportion of carbohydrates, protein and fat is very important in the control of diabetes all of these food sources will raise your blood glucose (not gram for gram equally). Testing your glucose at one and two hours after eating is going to provide you with confusing results due to the unpredictability of pancreatic insulin release after eating a given meal, your state of hydration, hepatic glycogenolysis (glucose release from liver stores), the rate of absorption of nutrients from your intestines, the degree of insulin resistance you have (the primary cause of Type II Diabetes) amongst several other factors.

      Your goals are to:

      1. Follow closely the total daily caloric intake recommended by your physician which should take into account the additional needs of the growing fetus.
      2. Follow closely the physician-recommended levels of exercise (even daily walks) which will act to keep your glucose down.
      3. The proportion and types of carbohydrates, protein and fat you are eating as recommended by your physician.
      4. The times you are to measure your glucose.

      Remember, it is not a single glucose reading that is important but it is the trend of readings which determine glucose control. Also, be sure to keep a check on your glucose level long after you delivery your baby as Gestational Diabetes is a risk factor for development of Adult Onset Diabetes.

      The following link is an excellent resource with other important links for Gestational Diabetes. It is by the American Diabetes Association:

      http://diabetes.org/gestational-diabetes.jsp.

      Congratulations and Good Luck with your newborn!

      DrEarp

  32. QUESTION:
    No Blood/No Pinch Diabetic Glucose Testing? - Diabetes Information?
    hey guys,
    i am wondering if i can get some help, im looking to find a testing kit, for diabetics to monitor there glucose levels ... something with no blood required cause my grandmother needs to be testing her blood and she's not because she is stubborn and doesn't wanna have to pinch herself with the old fashion test kit... i heard i think it was in a tv commercial , a kit where you do not need to pinch yourself.... please any help @ all would be greatly appreciated... my grandma has been diabetic for a year+ and she hasn't been following no diet or monitoring her blood glucose ... and lately she hasn't been doing so good... she's all I got and I'm really worried , thank you

    - p.s. - does anyone know any good informative diabetic site, where i can find like recipes and food products good for diabetics... I wanna take head charge of her health !

    thanks guys & god bless

    • ANSWER:
      How To Prepare
      Fasting blood sugar (FBS)
      For a fasting blood sugar test, do not eat or drink anything other than water for at least 8 hours before the blood sample is taken.

      If you have diabetes, you may be asked to wait until you have had your blood tested before taking your morning dose of insulin or diabetes medication.

      2-hour postprandial blood sugar
      For a 2-hour postprandial test, eat a meal exactly 2 hours before the blood sample is taken. A home blood sugar test is the most common way to check 2-hour postprandial blood sugar levels.
      http://diabetes.webmd.com/blood-glucose?page=2

  33. QUESTION:
    My blood glucose level was at 104, is that good or bad?
    I am being tested for diabetes, my doctor prescribed me on of those One Touch Ultra blood glucose monitors, and I just took my blood glucose level and it was at 104, I had eaten dinner about an hour or so before I took my blood glucose level, I'm just kind of unfamiliar to the whole levels at which my blood glucose level I should have, help me? Sorry if this is really cluttered, my memory is going to the dumps.

    • ANSWER:
      Lilli, These numbers are the latest you can get. Most disagree with these numbers.But don't we want to catch diabetes in it's earliest stages? Here are the Numbers
      .Normal Fasting Blood Sugar
      A normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is:

      83 mg/dl (4.6 mmol/L) or less.

      Many normal people have fasting blood sugars in the mid and high 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) range.

      Though most doctors will tell you any fasting blood sugar under 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) is "normal", there are several studies that suggest that testing with a fasting blood sugar in the mid 90 mg/dl (5 mmol/L) range often predicts diabetes that is diagnosed a decade later.
      Post-Meal Blood Sugar (Postprandial)
      Independent of what they eat, the blood sugar of a truly normal person is:

      Under 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L) one or two hours after a meal.

      Most normal people are under 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) two hours after eating

      Your number was 104. GREAT> GREAT>
      To continue to stave off type 2 diabetes ,stay active , eat a low card diet.
      For a great site for a Low Glycemic diet - No Carb counting-http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm
      Work in a exercise program - Daily
      A great site to learn all about Diabetes is :http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/index.php

      Good luck to you

      Tin

  34. QUESTION:
    if an adult has 5L of blood, what is the total amount of glucose present in their blood stream?
    There's a precursor portion to the question but I'm not sure how it is relevant seeing as though they are asking for normal adult glucose ranges and use a diabetic as a control, but here it is:

    "A patient w/ diabetes has a blood glucose level of 175mg glucose per 100 mL blood..." followed by the above question.
    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      175mg/dL * 50 dL= 8750mg or 8.75 grams

      the average non=diabetic would have a blood glucose of around 90mg/dL for a total mass of 4.5 grams

  35. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to monitor blood glucose levels without drawing blood?
    I'm just curious. It's possible to measure the oxygen levels in the blood via those finger clamp devices they use in hospitals - how do these work? I know that if there was a similar method available, it would make things so much easier for the many people with diabetes!

    Also, is it possible to incorporate other blood tests (like the one for haemoglobin) into the current finger-pricking blood glucose monitoring devices? Maybe something like a multimeter but for blood?

    I'm just wondering because I'm pre-diabetic (impaired glucose tolerance) as well as anaemic, and even though it's not necessary for me to monitor my glucose levels, it might be a good idea to do so more often than my annual blood tests that probably aren't saying much since I'm taking medication and they're not fasting glucose tests or anything.

    Thanks for your help. I hope that somebody who is working in this field is/has investigated these avenues.
    I know that they're only measuring oxygen, but I was asking about the exact method in terms of whether it uses ultrasound attenuation or conductivity or what, to see if this could be modified to detect blood glucose.

    • ANSWER:
      Not reliably.

      the was a product once called the Gluco-Watch (or something like that). It was made in Europe and never sold in the United States. it is no longer made, period.

      It was a device like a wrist watch that claimed to read blood sugar through the skin without breaking the skin. It's readings were highly inaccurate! the American FDA would not approve it for sale in the US, European doctors spoke out against it, and the product died.

      it is NOT possible to include other readings (like hemoglobin or cholesterol) into the SAME device, because the glucose test strips cause a CHEMICAL reaction with the blood, thus changing its qualities, and making it useless for other tests.

      Simply put, there is NO "non-invasive" way to take a blood sugar reading.

      [The blood oxygen sensors work because as your blood oxygen supply increases, the translucency of the blood changes. So, they have a red LED on one side of the device (you can see it glow) and a light sensor on the other side (you can't see it). The device can measure how much light is being transmitted through your finger tip, and a computer program converts this to Oxygen Level (Percent). note, though, that the is NO chemical reaction with the blood itself, in this case.

      Same trick works on your ear lobe, too, but most people found the sensore to be uncomfortable, so they don't use them unless access to the fingers is not available.

      my doctor just got a new one -- the sensors, computer, and digital readout are ALL on the same little device that attachs to your finger! No more need to attach it to a larger device with a wire!]

  36. QUESTION:
    Recommended Blood Glucose Numbers - What are the Right Numbers?
    Depending on where you look, recommended blood glucose levels can vary. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) numbers differ from the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) guidelines. The ACE recommendations are more strict than the ADA's. How do you know which to follow? Ask your healthcare provider which goals are right for you. The table below compares the two sets of guidelines for blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol.

    How many times a day should you check your blood glucose levels?

    I got that here..
    http://ultraherbs.blogspot.com/2007/09/recommended-blood-glucose-numbers.html

    • ANSWER:
      Levels up to 100 mg/dL are considered normal.
      Levels between 100 and 126 mg/dl are referred to as impaired fasting glucose or pre-diabetes. These levels are considered to be risk factors for type 2 diabetes and its complications.
      Diabetes is typically diagnosed when fasting blood glucose levels are 126 mg/dl or higher.
      [Note: mg/dL = milligrams per deciliter]
      The total cholesterol values listed below are used to target therapy:
      * Desirable: Under 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)
      * Borderline high: 200 to 239 mg/dL
      * High risk: 240 mg/dL and higher

      In general, your risk for heart disease, including a heart attack, increases if your HDL cholesterol level is less than 40 mg/dL. More specifically, men are at particular risk if their HDL is below 37 mg/dL, and women are at particular risk if their HDL if their HDL is below 47 mg/dL.
      An HDL 60 mg/dL or above helps protect against heart disease.
      Women tend to have higher HDL cholesterol than men.

      A healthy LDL level is one that falls in the optimal or near-optimal range.
      * Optimal: Less than 100 mg/dL (less than 70mg/dL for persons with a history of heart disease or those at very high risk for atherosclerotic disease)
      * Near Optimal: 100-129 mg/dL
      * Borderline High: 130-159 mg/dL
      * High: 160-189 mg/dL
      * Very High: 190 mg/dL and higher
      [Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories.]

      Normal values of Triglyceride
      * Normal: Less than 150 mg/dL
      * Borderline High: 150-199 mg/dL
      * High: 200-499 mg/dL
      * Very High: 500 mg/dL or above
      I am a diabetic patient for the last 17 years. I usually check glucose level once in a month and the the result is normal. I do not use anti-diabetic pills. I usually check lipid profile, HbA1c test, SGOT/SGPT (liver function tests) and Microalbuminuria test once in every 3 or 6 months. I consult the doctor every month.
      Please see the web pages for more details on Cholesterol, HDL, LDL and Triglycerides.

  37. QUESTION:
    Cat's glucose blood level is in the 300s range- does this def. mean Diabetes?
    Could stress and eating prior to the testing affect the results? I was not happy with the vet's attitude for a number of reasons and was wondering if it's possible that the upper respiratory he has (that has been lingering) or any other factors could be throwing off the results and should I take him for another opinion somewhere else? He has lost about 5 lbs over the past 3 mos, but is eating and drinking alot. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      The number alone although a diabetic number does not mean diabetes. When you add the eating and drinking alot it does mean diabetes. You can confirm this yourself. Get some ketodiastic reagent strips from the pharmacy and check the urine to see if sugar is spilling in.

      The good news is that this is not a death sentence, no life span needs to be lost and your cat can live a very long and happy life
      The bad news is that most vets are not up to date on correct treatment of this, some can be very dangerous with their advice, and you have to be the primary caregiver and be proactive.
      I can help you. I work with diabetic cat owners worldwide and i can teach you what you need to know to treat this correctly. I can also save you a bit of money. All I ask is that you care enough to do the work needed to take care of your cat. If interested, you can email me at justken@rocketmail.com and we can see where we go to from here.

  38. QUESTION:
    Explanation for FBS (fasting blood sugar) higher than RBG (random blood glucose)?
    My dad is a diabetic and his fasting blood glucose levels are always higher than his random blood glucose levels. He has had diabetes for about 4 months now. Is this something to be worried about? Should he see a doctor? Is this condition common?

    • ANSWER:
      Liver dump, dawn phenomenon and dawn effect are all common terms that describe the same condition. It is an abnormally high early-morning fasting increase in blood glucose. It usually occurs between 4:00 AM and 8:00 AM. It occurs in everyone's body, but it has more impact on diabetics than normal bodies. It is more common in people with type I diabetes than in people with type II diabetes. Understanding the phenomenon can go a long way towards helping diabetics manage it.

      The liver is responsible for the increase in glucose levels in the bloodstream. The brain, vital organs, the creation of red blood cells, and muscle tissue are constantly consuming glucose to function (24 hours per day). When the glucose levels in the bloodstream drop, the brain sends a message, via hormones, to release more glucose.

      At the same time, these same hormones signal the pancreas to reduce the amount of insulin that is produced and released into the bloodstream. In a normal body, the balance of glucose and insulin levels will be regulated. However, diabetics have an impaired control over this balance. Type I diabetics and insulin-dependent type II diabetics do not produce, either enough or, any insulin. The insulin in their system is dependent upon periodic injections. When the hormone insulin is out of balance with the other hormones (cotisol, glucagon and epinephrine), the liver will release too much glucose.

      Also, as the result of normal hormonal changes. The body's internal clock recognizes that it is morning, and the wake-up process begins. The hormones cause the increase in blood glucose levels. No one actually knows what the exact cause of the phenomenon is, but many believe that it is increases in the hormones cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine, that causes increases in insulin resistance.

      A liver dump is when glycogen stored in the liver is turned into glucose (glycogenolysis) and it is released into the blood stream. The result is that blood glucose goes up, in spite of no food having been consumed. It is a natural process, and it usually happens when it has been a long time since your last meal. This why a lot of people get liver dumps in the morning. You can reduce the chances of it happening by eating something before going to bed.

      Some protein just before going to bed.

      Take care
      Tin

  39. QUESTION:
    Are there special times when blood glucose should be measured ? ?
    Any time you feel ill, and over time if you can feel your blood sugar becoming too low or too high, you should check your blood glucose levels. You should also be aware that a reading over 20mmol/l should prompt a urine test for the presence of ketones.

    http://www.readaboutdiabetes.com/diabetes_and_blood_glucose.html

    http://www.readaboutdiabetes.com

    • ANSWER:
      Quit posting these sites. We don't want a dang virus...

  40. QUESTION:
    i just tested my blood glucose level for the first time... i havnt been diagnoesed with diabetes or anything?
    just worried about it so i tested myself it came out to be 95 is that normal? low? or high? i tested in the morning just after i woke up i havnt eaten nothing am i ok?

    • ANSWER:
      yes thats normal

  41. QUESTION:
    Is this glucose/blood sugar level high enough to be at rick for diabetes?
    I just got a blood test done for my anemia but they also told be my blood sugar is high.
    it's an AVERAGE of 6.6mmol/L, i think that's 119mg/dl... i think

    Am i at risk?

    • ANSWER:
      Normal Fasting Blood Sugar
      A normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is:

      83 mg/dl (4.6 mmol/L) or less.

      Many normal people have fasting blood sugars in the mid and high 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) range.

      Though most doctors will tell you any fasting blood sugar under 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) is "normal", there are several studies that suggest that testing with a fasting blood sugar in the mid 90 mg/dl (5 mmol/L) range often predicts diabetes that is diagnosed a decade later.
      Post-Meal Blood Sugar (Postprandial)
      Independent of what they eat, the blood sugar of a truly normal person is:

      Under 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L) one or two hours after a meal.

      Most normal people are under 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) two hours after eating.
      A1c
      A truly normal A1c is between 4.6% and 5.4%

      A1cs are not as good a measure of actual blood sugar control in individuals as they are for groups. An A1c of 5.1% maps to an average blood sugar of 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) or less when group statistics are analyzed, but normal variations in how our red blood cells work make the A1cs of truly normal individuals fall into a wider range.

      Some people's A1cs are always a bit higher than their measured blood sugars would predict. Some are always lower. NOTE: If you are anemic your A1c will read much lower than your actual blood sugars and the resulting A1c is not a useful gauge of your actual blood sugar control.

      Yes . High. You need to worry. Maybe start on a Low glycemic Index diet and start to exercise.

      Tin

  42. QUESTION:
    Is a blood glucose level of 125,127 2 hrs after eating normal?
    I am not diagnosed with diabetes or am not pre-diabetic-I hope not. But a couple months ago, I had a lab tested fasting glucose level of 126. I just started checking my levels again a couple days ago, and notice that my fasting glucose is between 95 and 110, and 2 hrs after eating it is between 125 and 127. I've only been keeping track for a few days now, but should I notify my doctor of these levels?

    • ANSWER:
      You really do need to make your physician aware of these readings. A non-diabetic's fasting glucose typically does not exceed 100 mg/dL and a non-diabetic's 2 hour postprandial (after meal) glucose typically does not exceed 140 mg/dL. Please note that I say 'typically' as there will be some variation from day to day. Some diabetics will initially present with a normal fasting glucose but an elevated postprandial glucose. Some diabetics will initially present with a normal postprandial glucose but an elevated fasting glucose. Some diabetics will present with an elevated fasting and an elevated postprandial glucose. Your postprandial readings are fine but your fasting readings need to be checked by your physician. The physician will also order a glycated (the more common terminology 'glycosylated' is biochemically incorrect) hemoglobin A1C. The A1C gives the 90 day mean (average) glucose. A non-diabetic's A1C will be less than 6.0% which approximates (the relationship between A1C and glucose is nonlinear) a 90 day mean glucose of 126 mg/dL. You truly should see your physician for such testing and a definitive determination of whether or not you have early diabetes. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and happiness and in all things may God bless. JR

  43. QUESTION:
    Why are women with Gestational Diabetes expected to keep their blood sugar levels lower than non-diabetics?
    For instance, I have researched that a regular non-diabetic person is expected to have a fasting blood glucose level between 70-126 (3.8 - 7.0) and a 2 hour post meal reading between 126-180 (7.0 - 10.0). However a women diagnosed with GD (a faulty system of testing in my opinion) must maintain a fasting reading of 95 (5.3) and a 2 hour reading of 120 (6.7). Is my research on regular non-diabetic readings false or is something wonky going on here? Also worth mentioning, I was diagnosed with this in my last pregnancy, never changed my diet but never tested over either during any of my 4-times-a-day pricks. Any thoughts/facts appreciated, just not those who take a doctor's word as gospel....looking for people who think for themselves.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to keep it lower because you need a cushion of safety--having a high glucose level damages your organs and tissues, and your baby's organs and tissues, permanently. Plus, while you can be sure that a person without diabetes will quickly be able to lower their glucose after eating, so time at high-normal will be brief, people with diabetes don't have the same guarantee. Plus, having a high glucose level for prolonged periods of time while pregnant can permanently mess up your child's metabolism. They can end up with extra sensitivity to glucose, and insensitivity to insulin, making them more disposed to get diabetes at a younger age. The thing you have to understand is that even diabetics who religiously follow all the rules still end up with all kinds of problems and damage, because it really is that dangerous to have high glucose.

  44. QUESTION:
    the blood glucose level is normal. but glucose is excreted through urine during diabetic nepropathy.?
    the blood glucose level is normal. but the glucose is excreted through urine during diabetes nepropathy. if there is any chance for decrease in the level of blood glucose even the glucose is excreted through urine.

    • ANSWER:
      Your question is not really a question but a statement. but if your blood glucose level is normal then glucose WILL NOT be excreted in the urine. Glucose is only excreted by the kidneys when its level is ABOVE normal level in the blood Speak to your doctor again and ask him to clear up this misunderstanding

  45. QUESTION:
    Weird blood glucose levels?
    I have been tested for Diabetes 3 or 4 times in the last 6 months due to other medical issues and have always been in the normal range. Within the last week I have been suddenly really thirsty. Just out of curiosity I checked my glucose levels on my freinds gluco-meter and my levels were about 400. This was about 30 minutes after I ate a big meal. Can eating spike your levels that much or should I go see a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      yes it can depending on what you ate. also being really thirsty can be a sign of a reaction (meaning you need to eat). i would recommend buying a glucometer for yourself and checking your blood when you wake up, before/after you eat, just before bed and when you feel like something just isn't right. then document what your levels were and anything that may have happened that day or when you checked your levels (such as super thirsty, headache, tummy ache etc) as well as date and time. take that in hand for your next dr's appt. nobody knows your body like you do and when something isn't right you know first. it could be possible that the testing isn't coming out right or maybe you had just ate or whatever. so try monitoring yourself for awhile and maybe the dr will see that something is going on or if it is something else maybe the tests you do could help pin point that.

      there are some cheap yet accurate glucometers out there that can do the trick for you till you figure out what's going on....good luck!

  46. QUESTION:
    Do my higher-than-normal blood glucose levels mean anything?
    I have been monitoring my blood glocose levels pretty carefully because I failed the 3-hour gestational diabetes test. However, my doctor doesn't think I have diabetes; she thinks I had a stress reaction to having that much sugar in my body at one time. I am monitoring my sugars just to confirm.

    Most of my readings have been between 73 and 79 (fasting) and 82-88 (2 hours after meals).

    I have been really, really sick the last couple of days (swine flu without the fever), haven't slept hardly at all, and have been trying to work from home while taking care of my 2-year-old who does have a high fever. I haven't been eating that much, but nevertheless I've gotten a couple of "post-meal" readings of 115. The other readings are normal for me (i.e., in the 70s and 80s).

    Do the two 115 readings indicate maybe I DO have gestational diabetes? Or is that much of an increase from normal consistent with being sick and stressed?

    • ANSWER:
      No, occasional 115s are nothing to get concerned about. Due to the fact that you have a major illness going on, I am surprised that your glucose levels aren't much higher.

      I disagree with the GTT as a form of testing to see if people have gestational diabetes. Anything syrupy made me very very ill when I was pregnant. But the doctors didn't routinely test us for diabetes then. A1c was only a dream then too. They relied on urinalysis to see if a person was at risk, and if one couldn't keep even a sip of something sickly sweet down, that wouldn't have been a good test. (syrupy stuff still makes me ill 40 years later)

  47. QUESTION:
    How to lower blood sugar levels with type II diabetes?
    My mother is a diabetic and she does her best to control her blood sugar. She used to drink lots of green tea after eating foods high in glucose and it used to lower her blood sugar. Unfortunately, she has just realized that she has kidney stones and the doctor told her to stop drinking green tea. Do you know of any other home remedy that she could use?

    Ps: she does take Gen Glybe ( perscribe medication) for her diabetes.

    • ANSWER:
      There are several home remedies other than green tea. They are all natural herbs that you can find in specific regions, together with certain vitamins and minerals.

      -Bitter melon juice
      -Cinnamon
      -Gymnema Sylvestre
      - Banaba

      Some of the home remedies are very difficult to get, it depends where do you live.
      For more info check the source below

  48. QUESTION:
    My blood glucose levels?
    I'm aware without a doctor and without fully knowing my situation, a diagnosis of Diabetes is not possible. I'd just like your input as to whether or not the numbers i've been getting are normal or pin-point to diagnosis. I have had a GTT test and should get the results in a few days.

    I bought a monitor and some test strips and have been monitoring my blood suguar levels in mmol/l daily since my Doctor sent me for the GTT.

    My morning level (or fasting) is usualy around 5.5 mmol/l.

    After two hours eating i'm down to between 6 and 7 mmol/l

    I've never gone higher than 8.7 mmol/l

    Thanks for any input you may be able to give me.

    • ANSWER:
      I disagree slightly with the information offered by syl c.

      The information she offers:

      "Normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is:

      83 mg/dl (4.6 mmol/L) or less.

      Many normal people have fasting blood sugars in the mid and high 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) range.

      Though most doctors will tell you any fasting blood sugar under 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) is "normal", there are several studies that suggest that testing with a fasting blood sugar in the mid 90 mg/dl (5 mmol/L) range often predicts diabetes that is diagnosed a decade later."

      is a direct copy from someone else who regularly spouts the same rubbish. Both indicate that "there are several studies that suggest that testing with a fasting blood sugar in the mid 90 mg/dl (5 mmol/L) range often predicts diabetes that is diagnosed a decade later." yet neither of them post any links to see these studies.

      The general consensus is that in a non-diabetic the fasting blood glucose (after not having eaten overnight) level would be between the ranges of 70 and 99 mg/dL (3.9 and 5.5 mmol/l).

      In a non-diabetic, a post-prandial (after eating) reading taken two hours after eating would not normally be expected to be above 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/l). I say normally as blood glucose levels are never static. There are reasons why someone MIGHT get a reading over 140 mg/dL and these COULD be as a result of underlying infection, periods of extreme stress, and/or the taking of certain types of medication.

      As you can see, your reading of 8.7 mmol/l is higher than the 'normal' level than might be expected in a non-diabetic. This does NOT, however, indicate that you are diabetic. See the reasons I offer as to why/how this level could be exceeded.

      The good news is, you've been requested to carry out a GTT (Glucose Tolerance Test) ... also called an OGTT (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test). The results from this test will enable your doctor to either diagnose you with diabetes, state that you have a glucose intolerance ... which is basically saying that you're on your way to developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, refute that there's any problem whatsoever, or consider requesting that you carry out more testing.

      Whatever the outcome of your GTT, I wish you the very best of luck for a long, happy, healthy life.

      Be well.

  49. QUESTION:
    Healthy and Maximum Blood Glucose Values?
    What is a normal level for people without diabetes and the maximum value your blood sugar should be at?

    Websites and books all have their own values. From http://www.overcome-diabetes.com/educator63.htm “In people without diabetes, blood glucose usually does not exceed 7 mmol/l” that means the glucose level should not be over 7 mmol/l x 18 = 126 mg? Is that random values? Other places say 110 mg or even 100 mg. Randomly I range 72 to 200, is this normal?

    I was at 159 mg after working out and my doctor said it is a normal value for non-diabetics

    Thank you for all you’re your great input

    • ANSWER:
      faasting upto 110 m/dl, random upto 130 and aftermeals 140

  50. QUESTION:
    While pregnant, did you have to take a glucose tolerance test for gestational diabetes?
    If so, was it because it was something your OB routinely did for all of his/her pregnant patients, or was it just because you showed some risk factor for it such as history or a high urine/blood glucose level?

    • ANSWER:
      Its routine. Everyone said the drink was horrible and made them throw up so I was kinda nervous when I had to do mine. To me the drink was not that bad, mine tasted like a orange drink with alot of suger. I didnt get sick.


Blood Glucose Levels For Diabetics

What is the Cause of Diabetes?

In type 2 diabetes, high blood sugar levels occur when glucose is prevented, to a significant degree, from entering cells of the body, notably liver, muscle, and fat cells. This is caused by a "short circuit" in the insulin signaling pathway, a cascade of highly specific chemical reactions that allow insulin to fulfill its role as the facilitator of glucose transport through the cell walls. Insulin is produced by the pancreas in response to elevated blood glucose levels; once it enters the blood, it signals the body's cells to take up the excess glucose until normal levels are restored.

When insulin molecules bind to the insulin receptors on cell walls, tiny molecular "gates" open up and allow glucose molecules to pass through. If this system is impaired, the gates don't respond adequately to the insulin signal, thus preventing the glucose from entering the cell. This condition, which is a common consequence of obesity, is called insulin resistance, and it's both a harbinger and a symptom of diabetes. With insulin resistance, glucose levels in the blood remain high, a very dangerous condition in the long run. The pancreas tries to compensate by making more insulin, but this works only for so long. Eventually, the pancreas becomes overburdened and starts making less insulin. That's when things go from bad to worse.

One of the most exciting recent discoveries in health is cinnamon and its effects on blood sugar (glucose) levels. The positive effect of cinnamon on blood sugar were discovered by accident at the USDA testing center in Maryland where scientists were testing the effects of various foods on blood sugar (glucose) levels. They were surprised when good ol' apple pie actually helped lower glucose levels.


Average Levels Of Blood Sugar

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Type 2 Diabetic and my average blood sugar level is 90 to 100, is that good or bad?
    I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes in March of 06. I have been taking Actoplus Met (or is it Actomet Plus?) since then and my blood sugar levels are an average of 90 to 100, no higher than 115. Is that a good level to stay at or do I need to get down into the 80's and try and stay there. I can usually pull off maybe 2 or 3 days in a week where my morning blood sugar level is in the 80's but mostly it stays in the low 90's. I am just curious as to what is a good, better, & best blood sugar level?

    • ANSWER:
      You should understand that Type 2 is not a simple, one note, sort of problem. There are Type 2's who don't need medication, just some exercise, weight loss and care in eating (less junk food). some, like you need only a little intervention, others fail to respond to the usual first level drugs, the sulfonylureas, and will move on, most likely, to insulin.

      For all of them, the object of diabetes management is to keep blood glucose as close to normal as possible, for it's been shown very clearly in several large studies of both Type 1 and Type 2, that the closer patients get to 'normal levels" the fewer complications they have -- eye problems, kidney problems, wound healing and circulation, etc.

      Normal in most humans is between around 80 and perhaps 110 mg/dl, while fasting, and perhaps up to 140 or so for a couple of hours after a meal. The Hba1c reading, which is a kind of average of the last 90 days or so of your blood glucose levels, should correspond.

      So, if the readings you give are actually your usual fasting values, and if you don't go really high after a meal for a long time, you're just fine. When you check is important, for a single check in the morning isn't enough. Your blood glucose levels will change regularly, from minute to minute, depending on what and how much you ate, how much and when you get some exercise, and so on.

      It's dangerous for your blood glucose too low, and how low is too low varies a bit with the individual. Typeically below 60 or so, people begin to have hypoglycemic symptoms, which are not to be taken lightly. If they go too far down, they're dangerous.

  2. QUESTION:
    There is a provision to know the average blood sugar of 7 days and 14 days in gluco meter. what is the use?
    Is there any use to know that average blood sugar levels of 7 ad 14 days? Kindly give correct answers.

    • ANSWER:
      They show trends for you. The 14-day average is a pretty good approximation of the A1C test of long term blood sugar, and the 30-day average is even better, if they have that.

      It certainly depends on when you take the readings. You may be missing representative times. Still, my 30-day average is precisely in line with what my A1C count says. The key is to sample fairly randomly.

  3. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know what a good average blood sugar level is?
    I passed out at work today and think it was because of my blood sugar! Diabetes runs in my family and I have a checker I just don't know what the average is!

    • ANSWER:
      The range of normal blood glucose is 80 to 120. The average normal non-diabetic person will have a BG of between 85 to 95 two hours after a meal. As a diabetic that's the number to shoot for. It's hard as hell to get numbers matching normal non-diabetics without conscienously making an effort. I have dropped my BG's from the high 400's to about 110 over the course of 18 months. I have a meal plan for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Of course, I stray but I try to keep it to a minimum, just the same. My averages are 100 for the morning, 110 - 119 for noon and dinner time is about 95-115. My A1c went from 14 down to 6.2 over that time. If I can do it, anyone can. It just takes effort.

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the average blood sugar level for a 14 year-old boy who weighs 150 pounds?
    For a science project we must find the average blood for a 14 year-old boy with the weight of 150 pounds. If anyone know this please answer ASAP.

    • ANSWER:
      It will vary because of what you eat.

      Glucose levels swing somewhat from day to day and from individual to individual. Therefore, if high glucose levels are found, it is advised that measurement should be repeated on the following three days. Only then should hyperglycemia be noted as an enduring symptom and treatment started.

      Go to this website to read more and for the table: http://www.medbio.info/Horn/PDF%20files/sugar.pdf

  5. QUESTION:
    what does a hba1c of 9.2 translate into in average blood sugar levels?

    • ANSWER:
      To convert an A1c to the new average mean blood glucose, use this formula:
      eAG(mg/dl) = (28.7 X HbA1c) – 46.7

      So the old method has an A1c of 6% at an average blood glucose of 135mg/Dl, and using the new formula will give you 126mg/DL, and a 7% A1c now equals a eAG of 154mg/DL instead of 170mg/DL.

      So your average is 217 not 250. Not good at all. You are risking neuropathy , blindness ,kidney problems , heart disease. You need to up your meds. Start on a low glycemic index diet. Heres a website for a list of 2, 480 foods.
      http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm Start today. Also a exercise program. Nordic Walking is great . 30 minutes a day at least.
      Nordic walking is defined as fitness walking with specially designed poles. It evolved from an off-season ski-training activity known as ski walking, hill bounding or ski striding to become a way of exercising year-round. Ski walking and hill bounding with poles has been practiced for decades as dry land training for competitive Nordic skiers. Ski coaches saw the success of world class cross country skiers who used ski poles in the summer for ski walking and hill bounding and it became a staple of off-season Nordic ski training. Hikers with knee pain discovered they could walk more powerfully with a pair of trekking poles, often eliminate or reduce hip, knee foot pain, and backpackers found relief from painful backs when using poles.

      In 1997, a Finnish ski pole manufacturer Exel, introduced the trademarked Nordic Walker® poles, equipped with special Nordic walking straps, and "Nordic walking" became the accepted generic term for fitness walking with specially designed poles. The Nordic skiing savvy Northern Europeans quickly embraced this dry land hybrid of two of their favorite fitness activities -- Nordic skiing and walking, and in a little more than a decade after its introduction in Europe, an estimated 10 million people around the globe have taken up fitness walking with specially designed poles as a regular form of exercise[citation needed].

      Description
      Nordic walking can be done year round in any climate and anywhere a person of any age or ability might otherwise walk without poles. It combines simplicity and accessibility of walking with simultaneous core and upper body conditioning similar to Nordic skiing. The result is a full-body walking workout that can burn significantly more calories without a change in perceived exertion or having to walk faster, due to the incorporation of many large core, and other upper-body muscles which comprise more than 90% of the body's total muscle mass and do work against resistance with each stride. 'Normal walking' utilizes less than 70% of muscle mass with full impact on the joints of the legs and feet.

      Nordic Ski Walking produces up to a 46% increase in energy consumption compared to walking without poles.[1]
      I use plain old wooden sticks.Do it today , do it now. Please. Pretty please.>

      OMG I've done it again !!!

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the average blood sugar level at the start of a diabetic seizure?

    • ANSWER:
      It varies from person to person. I can't say what it is for you or your family member, but the link to the Mayo clinic below defines hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) below 70 for a 'normal' person. (whatever that means)

      One problem is that someone with very high blood sugar for a long time might have problems even at 120, if they've been at 300 for a long time, for an example. The better thing to do is adjust the control over a period of days until you have it controlled within a normal, then ideal range.

  7. QUESTION:
    What is an average blood sugar level for a 15 year old boy?
    Seriously, wat is it? Because mine was high for an adult... so yea!!! I really need to know. And what are some common signs of being a teenage diabetic?

    • ANSWER:
      I am in a class right now to learn more about my diabetes. The normal blood sugar is between 80-120. 2 hours after eating is the best time to check it. If it is higher than 150 then I would have him checked. My symptoms were severe thirst, headaches, and containing fluid

  8. QUESTION:
    what is the average blood sugar level for a 14 year old that ways 48kgs and has no history of diabetes.?
    or where can i get that info from. what website please.

    • ANSWER:
      3 to 7 mmol/l

  9. QUESTION:
    what is the average LEVELS ( numbers) for BOTH Blood Sugar & Cholesterol?
    My husband and I went to a Health Fair today. It was very nice because all who go received a lot of valuable information and even free tests.

    I demanded that my husband and I to take the free BLOOD SUGAR TEST as well as the CHOLESTEROL TEST? .....I was scared for the results but faced my fears anyways.

    We had just ate maybe 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 hours prior but wanted to take a random test to check our levels.

    I was told I had great levels where as my husband was told he was borderline. I wanted to make sure of this by asking those here on Yahoo in the hopes of MANY REAL ANSWERS!

    I always like to double check on results because I never want to get my hopes up. Regardless my husband and I need to seriously lose weight and have been slowly and today, we found out where we are on our health (levels).

    Here is the INFO:

    My husband will be 40 years old in December and here are HIS numbers:

    RANDOM BLOOD SUGAR (GLUCOSE) : 128
    CHOLESTEROL: 254

    HERE ARE MINE........... ( AGE 27 IN ONE WEEK):

    RANDOM BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS (GLUCOSE): 83.....YES 83 ( I was shocked as hell)

    CHOLESTEROL: 161......this one I am not sure of....High or low???

    PLEASE ANSWER ONLY IF YOU HAVE KNOWLEDGE OR KNOW WHAT IS NORMAL AND WHAT IS HIGH .....PLEASE REFRAIN FROM RUDE REMARKS...

    *****EASY 10 POINTS****

    IF YOU NEED ADDITIONAL INFO, PLEASE ADVISE !

    THANKS EVERYBODY!!!!!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Per most guidelines today, cholesterols should be under 200; a bit depends on the other levels such as HDL, LDL levels; but total cholesterol around 200. Blood sugar should be under 100-110 (greater than 110 +/- is considered diabetic). BUT, in order to be more specific, they must be fasting levels, So you are fine ( ;) ) but your husband should be re-tested when he is fasting. Then decisions can be made. You stated you are trying to lose wt and wt loss could certainly bring your husband's down to better levels. Good luck

  10. QUESTION:
    Sudden increase in blood sugar levels?
    I'm type 1 diabetic and my overall average of blood sugar levels has risen from about 5-7 to 9-12, with no change to insulin. My insulin is brand new, hasn't been frozen or overheated, and my injection sites are fine. I'm not on any other medication and I haven't made any changes to my diet or anything. What could be up?

    • ANSWER:
      Your insulin needs change as you age. You may need to up your insulin to carb ratio. You need to keep a log of what you eat, how many carbs you eat and how much insulin you take. Look for patterns and test a few hours after you eat to be sure you covered your food properly. Every so often you have to re-evaluate your insulin regimen.

  11. QUESTION:
    Average diabetes type 2 blood sugar level (in mmol/l) after 2 hours of meal?
    For diabetes type 2 only please :)

    What is your average blood sugar level after 2 hours of meal?

    I have been diagnosed with diabetes type 2 and I now try to control it, however, my blood sugar level after 2 hours still looks pretty high (ranging from 8-15, average around 10), but it usually goes down back to around 5 after 5 hours.

    I know the blood sugar level is all depends on what you ate, activity, level of stress, hormone, etc etc, but I just want to know what is your average approximately?

    Thanks.
    By the way, I didn't take any medicine or insulin, 27 in age and would be interested to know people with similar circumstances (age around 20-30 without any medicine or insulin).

    • ANSWER:
      Most of us are about twice your age limit! and we aren't afraid of the meds either!!

      I work hard to keep mine back down to close to 8 after meals, around 2 hours.

      I also absolutely never go more than 4 hours without eating a small meal. Good control means never spiking more than 175 and never getting hungry. It is a little hard to do, but can be done - with or without meds and insulins.

      Eating very low carb food plan is best plan. I never eat potato, carrots, corn, peas, dried beans/lentils, pastas, breads, cereals, rices and have very little milk product.

  12. QUESTION:
    Can you be diabetic if you have alot of the symptoms but blood sugar levels are usually 102-104 average?

    First thing in the morning 101-107 before dinner 101-120.
    Frequent urination, thirsty, hungry, tired, eye, foot, urine infection.

    • ANSWER:
      That's great average! I think you could have highs and not be testing for them on an at home meter and when you do test there is a good number so the meter average would be still good. BUT I also think if you felt like people do when you blood sugar is 200 or 300 you would most definitely check! So I personally don't think you have it but if you are worried then you have the responsibility to get yourself checked out. Make an appointment and your fears to rest.

  13. QUESTION:
    Why does my blood sugar level rise while I am sleeping?
    I can have an average blood sugar level of somewhere in the 80's when I go to bed, only having a VERY light snack that night, and wake up the next morning and my blood sugar level will be around 100 to 110. I KNOW that the snack that I ate didn't raise my blood sugar almost 20 points and keep it there over the course of the night. Does ANYONE else have a problem with their morning numbers beeing high?

    • ANSWER:
      The Dawn Phenomenon - A Diabetics Nightmare?

      Have you ever heard of the Dawn Phenomenon before? No, it's not the name of the latest sci-fi movie at your local theater. If you have recently been diagnosed with diabetes you may have never heard of the Dawn Phenomenon before. I can tell you firsthand that until my doctor told me about it I had no clue myself.

      So, what is the Dawn Phenomenon? First, let me ask you this; have you checked your blood glucose level in the evening?Have you then taken it again the next morning before eating, only to find it much higher than it was the night before? Totally frustrating isn't it? In short, you've entered into the Dawn Phenomenon.

      Diabetes can be quite aggravating at times. So many times I would have an evening blood sugar reading of 110mg/dL only to take it the next morning and find it to be 145mg/dL. Well, it must be due to you eating a late night bowl of ice cream along with 4-5 chocolate chip cookies! No, I wouldn't even eat anything after dinner and have the same set of numbers the following day.

      One of the amazing aspects about the Dawn Phenomenon is that everyone experiences it, diabetics as well as non-diabetics.
      The Dawn Phenomenon affects us during the late night/early morning hours while we are at sleep. Our bodies release certain types of hormones that are designed to help maintain and repair our body. This is a good thing. But, between the hours of 3:00-8:00 AM things begin to happen inside our body.

      In simple terms, what happens next is that our bodies respond to this release of hormones by releasing stored glucose. Because this is all happening in the late night/early morning hours, it causes your blood sugar level to increase. You will notice it by testing yourself in the early morning when you first get up. If you get a much higher reading, it's most likely the result of the Dawn Phenomenon (unless of course you ate that ice cream and cookies).

      Is there any way of preventing this from happening? Good question. Yes, there are a few things that can help reduce those AM readings. The first one is perhaps the most obvious one. Talk with your doctor or health care provider. They may need to make a change to your medication or diet, so always talk to them first.

      Keep track of your eating habits. If you are eating foods with too many carbohydrates in the evening, this could also cause a much higher morning reading. Perhaps eat a late evening snack of peanut butter and crackers, or a couple of slices of deli meat and cheese.

      Another thing you might want to do is get some exercise. Take an evening walk or bike ride. Just 30 minutes of brisk exercise in the evening can be enough to lower your blood glucose level. Not to mention how good the physical activity is for your body.

      You can try to fast after your evening meal. This will leave you with a much lower nighttime blood sugar level which will many times offset the effects of the Dawn Phenomenon. You can know by trying it and testing it for yourself.

  14. QUESTION:
    Question about blood sugar levels?
    I was recently diagnosed with type II diabetes. My fasting blood sugar was 315. My doctor wanted to put me on some medication, but the pills she prescribed would cost me over 0 per month, which I can not afford. She said the only other option for me would be insulin, which at 32 years old, I absolutely do not want to be dependent on for the rest of my life. I spoke with some members of my family and my husband's family that have diabetes, and they all agree that insulin is not a good option for me.

    I have heard that exercising, changing my diet to a low sugar / low carb diet, and losing weight can actually make my diabetes reverse itself. I would like to try losing weight and changing my diet to bring down my blood sugar levels. Eating very little carbs & drinking lots of water has brought down my average blood sugar to 215 when fasting - around 300 after a complete meal. Sometimes after meals, if I can not exercise because of long hours at my desk job, my blood sugar will raise to as high as 380 or so, but most times it is 300 or less. My concern is whether this can be harmful to my body to have blood sugars levels of 215-350 on an every day basis while I try to get my diabetes under control? And what kind of harm can this do to my body? I really want to try to beat this on my own if possible, but I am scared to have high blood sugar on a daily basis while I try to undo the damage I have already done to my body by being overweight & not taking care of myself properly. Thanks for any advice & info.

    • ANSWER:
      Blood sugar that high on a regular basis can be very damaging to your body. Levels over 140 mg/dL contribute to diabetic complications and you're essentially double that all day, every day. I credit you for wanting to lose weight and adhere to a strict diet, but unfortunately you can't get your blood sugar down to a healthy range on your own. Don't feel ashamed or defeated. Insulin and oral medications are not a failure. They're going to help us live a very long time hopefully.

      I don't know where you live, but in the United States, Metformin--the most commonly prescribed diabetic drug--costs per month at Target and Wal-Mart pharmacies. I suspect your doctor prescribed you something other than Metformin because she believes that Metformin won't be enough to get your blood sugar under control. Metformin, unlike a lot of other diabetic drugs, does not stimulate your pancreas to produce more insulin. Metformin reduces the amount of glucose your liver releases and makes you more sensitive to the insulin you make. Thus, if you are very insulin deficient, Metformin probably won't be enough. And with an FBG of 315 mg/dL, that might be what she thinks. I always think Metformin is worth a try, though, because of the low incidence of serious side effects and hypoglycemia.

      Also, I know diabetics who had fasting levels as high or higher than yours who controlled blood sugar only on Metformin. My random blood sugar (non-fasting) when I was diagnosed was in the mid-300s, but I'm only on Metformin. My fasting blood sugar now ranges from 70-95 every day. It's possible on a low-carbohydrate diet. I strongly suggest you make another appointment ASAP and demand Metformin. You have nothing to lose even if Metformin doesn't work. Plus, Metformin sometimes helps with weight loss.

      Finally, I encourage you to lose weight and try to go off medication or insulin one day. I do want to caution you about the word "reversal." I have lost nearly 100 pounds since my diagnosis and I am still very much diabetic. My doctor promised me cures if only I could get the fat off because I was so young (late 20s) and otherwise in good health. Now, don't get me wrong - blood sugar control has gotten easier and I have been able to reduce my medication. There's no cure in sight, though. By the time blood sugar gets up as high as yours and mine, the pancreas has already lost a lot of function. We could get down to a perfect weight and possibly still not have enough function to control blood sugar without meds. And even if we could, we'd probably need to stay on a low-carbohydrate diet for life, which I'd be more than happy to do if it meant going off medication. I want you to strive for a goal, but I don't want you to get your hopes up about a cure that's just not going to happen. I've never known a diabetic to become cured through weight loss. I have known MANY diabetics who have lost weight, gone off meds, and controlled blood sugar through diet and exercise. That's management, not reversal, but it's something that I would love to have one day. And probably you would, too. So, all the best, and I hope your doctor signs off on the Metformin.

  15. QUESTION:
    What is an average your blood sugar level should be durng pregnancy?
    I am a type one diabetic who just found out she was pregnant, and am working on getting the pump. However, for the time being I am having to test and inject myself accordingly. I've noticed that at different times of the day my blood sugar levels tend to get up in the 200's. I catch it farely quickly, since I'm checking my blood sugars every hour now. But, I am wondering if there are any Diabetic Mom's out there who carried to term, a normal healthy baby, even with some high blood readings along the way? And also, if anyone can tell me if there is a specific number of highness that is when it gets scary, i.e. 400-500,, etc... Thanks!! :)

    • ANSWER:
      I'm a type 2 diabetic but I'm currently on my 2nd pregnancy. My first pregnancy I was treated by Dr. Jovanovich at the Sansum Clinic, someone who is at the forefront of research on pregnant diabetics.

      The theory is that the way to ensure the best outcome is to closely imitate non-diabetic women's blood sugars during pregnancy. Now here's the bad news: non-diabetic women have naturally lowered blood sugars during pregnancy. So the standards for blood sugars for diabetics are lower during pregnancy than when we're not pregnant.

      I followed this religiously during my first pregnancy and my daughter was born with no complications, 7 1/2 pounds, completely average and normal.

      Her targets were: morning fasting 90 or below, 120 or below 1 hour after eating. She wanted you to have an A1C of 5.5 before conceiving.

      My current endocrinologist gives me a little more breathing room. His targets are: morning fasting 95 or below, 130 or below 1 hour after eating.

      Low blood sugars don't hurt the baby, but high blood sugars are linked with some specific complications and higher risk of miscarriage. The most vulnerable time is the first 8 weeks of pregnancy, so keep this in mind if you're just starting out.

      Lastly, there's a very helpful message board for diabetic moms:

      http://forums.delphiforums.com/diabeticmommy/start
      Lots of real people dealing with these issues. Good luck and congratulations!

  16. QUESTION:
    VERY HIGH blood sugar levels...new diabetic?
    My mom (age 50) just found out shes a type 1 diabetic. She lost A LOT of weight! Her blood levels averaged at 400. She started insulin 10mg today...when will her sugar levels go down?

    • ANSWER:
      Adults do get type 1.
      She should feel better right away.

  17. QUESTION:
    What is the normal blood sugar level for a 32 year old female?
    My sugar level has and average of 70. Is it normal?

    • ANSWER:
      IMO - a little low... The average for an adult is supposed to be 90-ish.

      See your doctor - you could be hypoglycemic or if you're already diagnosed diabetic, your medication doses need to be changed.

  18. QUESTION:
    How many calorieres in a pint of blood?
    An average pint, blood sugar levels at norm etc.

    • ANSWER:
      Why? Are you a vampire who's trying to watch their figure?

  19. QUESTION:
    Nicotine replacement effecting blood sugar levels.?
    I am a non-diabetic and have recently quit smoking and I am on nicotine patches. I had gestational while pregnant 5 years ago. I still have my meter and test my sugar often. My levels after fasting for 8 hours is an average of 104-115. I am just wondering if nicotine replacement patchs can cause blood sugar levels to go up. I do get some symptoms like I had when I was pregnant with gestational diabetes. I have to use the bathroom often. When I dont eat like I should, I tend to get weak but my blood sugar levels are above 100. I dont want to be a worry wart, but I also want to know if this is enough of a concern for me to talk to my family doctor about.

    • ANSWER:
      I would have a fasting blood drawn by the doctor to rule out Type 2 diabetes. Since you had it gestationally, you may have developed Type 2. The patches should not have anything to do with your blood sugars. Are you eating more since you quite smoking? Maybe you are taking in more carbohydrates and that is boosting your sugars.

  20. QUESTION:
    Tackling high blood sugar levels early morning i.e. fasting blood sugar reading.?
    Over the last 2 years I have been losing weight, almost 25 pounds, my waist reduced by almost 2 inches, and during this period started feeling very tired during all day. Finally I visited my family primary care physician in Oct 2010. After lab test I realized that I had type 2 diabetes condition, with my blood sugar levels about 286 ( after lunch).

    Primary care physician referred me to a endocronologist, who wanted to put me on insulin ( a dose of 16 ) straight away. I did not like the idea. My reason was that, now that I know the cause of what is going wrong in my body, I need to give myself a chance to do all that is possible to redress the situation for a couple of months, and at that stage re-assess and take the decesion to get on to insulin.

    It has been two weeks since I started making changes to my life style like switching to low glycemic foods ( of below 40 ), and exercising on a daily basis at a medium level, and checking my blood sugar using ONE touch Ultra2 on a daily basis ( at least 8 to 10 times) to understand the increase and decrease in blood sugar levels in response to my eating times, excercise, stress etc. The other big change I have brought about is to give up battles in my mind which I dont need to fight, out of all the changes this has proved to be tough and is still proving to be tough.

    To my surprise and happiness, Im seeing my blood sugar levels dropping as a result of my above efforts. During the course of my monitoring I realized that there is a upper cap of my blood sugar in 320s and lower cap in early 200s. This was before 2 weeks.

    Since the time I have been eating low glycemic breakfast lunch dinner, lots of water, excercise at least once a day ( 40 minute brisk walk), my blood sugar levels have gone down to a range of 114 to 197. Since the last 4 days there has been only once instance when my blood sugar went above 200.

    My early morning reading i.e. fasting reading is still high it is averaging about 130 - 140 over the last 10 days, my after meal reading is average between 155-175.

    5 questions:

    1. What should I do to reduce my early morning i.e. on fast without food or water reading ? I want to bring it down to around 75 to 85.

    2. I have reduced carbs which has helped a lot, and switched to salads and meat. But body also needs carbs. What are the best sources of carbs in my context?

    3. I have observed that even though my blood sugar is less than 140 ( which is the standard for after meal) or in specific between 120 and 140, I feel some level of dizziness, and also some head ache early in the morning. Is this because of the reason that my blood sugar levels are coming back to normal after a long time i.e. I might have been in the 200s and early 300s for a long time, and over the last couple of weeks due to changes made to food and excercise it is being in the range of 130s - 180s ?? Is my body in the process of getting adjusted to the new relatively low blood sugar levels ?

    4.What are the symptoms we should expect when blood sugars are coming down to relatively low level from higher levels?

    5. Just want to add that my urine still smells sweet and is yellow in color. At what stage can I expect this to reduce. Note that when my blood sugar level is less than 150, the sweet smell in the urine goes down and the urine color is also light.
    17 hours ago

    6. My early morning fasting reading is the issue here. It is averaging around 150 to 160 over the last 2 weeks i.e. since I started taking low glycemic foods, excercise daily. Im quite sure it must have been much higher earlier. I want to tackle this area first, please suggest. What and when should I be eating the evening before to get my early morning readings to around 120 which is my first goal, before trying for 90.

    Im not on any medication.

    My readings during the day i.e. after breakfast, lunch, dinner currently are 150 to 160 before , and 2 hours later they settle at the same i.e.150-160 or go a little lower into 140s.

    It is obvious that I should be tackling my early morning readings first.
    Thank you very much for your response.

    But Im looking for opinions and tips and ideas with which I can work on my fasting blood sugar level over night. My first goal is to get it down to 110.

    • ANSWER:
      The effort you have made is awesome...I wish I had been so determined!

      The fact that you have made such an improvement in the last few weeks could possibly mean you can get away with not taking insulin (though I am not a doctor, so my opinions don't count for much) but you will still likely need to be on some sort of medication, such as Metformin, which is pretty common and has few side effects. The combination of your current diet/exercise/monitoring and a medication such as this could work very well for you...

      As for the fasting sugars, there isn't any sort of thing you can do to lower them specifically, other than lowering your overall levels...the lower your levels get during the day, the lower your fasting sugars will be in the morning. The only thing I could think of that could effect your morning readings would be if you ate fairly close to bedtime, and therefore did not give your body the chance to burn off what you took in...other than that, there's really no way to specifically lower fasting sugars.

      As far as carbs go, cut out anything "white" in your diet...white bread, white rice, etc. These carbs have been over processed and don't have a lot of nutritional value, and will sometimes raise your sugar almost as much as eating sweets... Even white potatoes can be bad...

      I would suggest cutting down your overall carb intake, and only taking in complex carbs from whole grains (i.e. whole wheat bread, whole grain cereals with lots of fiber, whole grain pitas, etc.). These types of carbs metabolize slower, and tend to have way more fiber and nutrients and are much better for you.

      However, I am not a nutritionist, so it's always best to get advice from a professional...just speaking from my own experience.

      I would suggest going back to your doctor, showing your improvement with diet and exercise, and asking about the possibility of other medications instead of the insulin (though I am taking insulin now because I am pregnant, and it's not as bad as I expected it to be...less painful than finger sticks, and as long as they start you off at a low dose and raise your insulin levels slowly, you aren't nearly as likely to get those "drops" you hear so much about). I would also suggest working with a nutritionist that works with diabetic patients and getting as much education about the disease as possible...

      Good luck!

  21. QUESTION:
    Im So Happy with my blood sugar levels!!! so far!?
    first i want to thank evryone who responded to my first post. last friday i was told i had diabetes, since then i changed my entire life upside down for the better, ive been to the gym every morning and doing 35 mins on a eliptical machine, i watch every...and i mean every thing i eat, no more soda, no more diet soda, no more gargage!! my blood sugar levels last week were at about 178-200.....this week my average has been 145-150...i take a one aday weight smart vitamin, and 1000mg of cinnamon. i hear it lowers blood sugar! I also lost about 6 pounds. my blood sugar at one point was about 125 for three nights in a row at about 5 pm....so i am very happy. i weigh 414....my goal is to see the 300's and then take 10 pounds at a time!!! i have a while to go to get my levels in the 105-15 range but i cant believe what a week can do to change blood sugar levels....i drink a massive amout of water a day, tht helps alot also.....so evryone out there just try your best....you will beat it!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Awesome Tony! Keep up the good work!

  22. QUESTION:
    How to decrease the Sugar in blood?
    My grandmother who is around 60 - 65 years, is having high sugar in blood, the average sugar level is 100, and her level is 550!!!
    Please help me, or I will lose my grandma..!
    She is having a large block in her heart, she had 2 blocks in heart before, we did antioplasty and antiogram and removed those blocks.
    Doctor said that there is a chance for an attack, she is basically dull, because her mom dead just before 2-3 weeks..
    i will make her eat anything to get rid of this sugar...

    Help Please........................!!!!!!!!!!
    I wanna know what all food she should eat, what she should'nt, what exercises she should do, what she should not do,,,

    Such dos and do nots

    • ANSWER:
      ask her to avoid all tea coffee with sugar ,potato ,food with oil butter,ghee etc ask her to drink bitter guard juice eat blackberrys seed powder please immediately consult a good: diabetes specilist he may suggest some medicine or insulin to bring sugar level down and also suggest a diet chart because this is a very high level only good doctor can help and go according to his advise

  23. QUESTION:
    Can weather affect my dog's blood sugar levels?
    I have a 9 year old diabetic dog. I have her on 8 units of NPH insulin twice daily. I typically test her twice a day at random times. Typically, her blood sugar has been failling in the 175-275 range. Yesterday, I preformed a blood sugar curve on her. The blood sugar readings were ranging, on average, 100 "points" above what she typically ranges. Today, it started to rain. I am wondering if the change in atmospheric pressure (causing the rain) could have affected her blood sugar. I plan on doing another blood curve in a few days when there is no rain. Also, I did not change her routine at all. She did not get any extra food or treats than normal. She exercised as normal. Any ideas?
    Also going to add this:
    My vet does not know much about diabetes. Cannot find a vet in the area that knows anything. So, our vet has basically given me the "reigns" to adjust her insulin based on what I feel is right. I know I have to adjust it soon. I just want to rule out possiblities on why her bg was higher than "normal" before I do any adjusting.
    Also, she was diagnosed July 19 of this year. We are currently in the process of regulation. We have changed her diet and adjusted her insulin for that about a month and a half ago. She is 30 pounds. Her starting dose was 4 units BID. We gradually increased it to 8 units BID.

    • ANSWER:
      As silly as it sounds, possibly. I'm a type 1 and the weather can affect my blood sugars. Sometimes I swear the phase of the moon does.

      Call your vet and talk with her too, just to bounce ideas.

  24. QUESTION:
    Diabetes "normal" blood sugar levels?
    I have done a lot of reading online about what normal results are for blood sugar levels and the majority of health sites seem to say 70 to 100.

    I test myself with a home kit about once a week because diabetes runs in my family. My lowest was 62 and my highest is never over 71. I seem to get the number 69 a lot. I test in the afternoons, at least two hours after I have eaten lunch, as suggested on different sites for the most accurate reading.

    Should I be considered that my blood sugar is constantly on the low side, even though I am only one point from what it considered normal on average?

    • ANSWER:
      It is low but fine if you feel good
      generally, you did not say if your tests are fasting tests or after breakfast by 2 hours because it is how diagnostic opinion should depend on
      however, here are the most normal readings:
      1) fasting for at least 8 hours= from 70 to 100 mg/dl
      2) hours after breakfast (after starting to eat and eating should not take more than 15 minutes) = less than 140 mg/dl
      3) any Random test not precisely dependent of eating = less than 200 mg/dl

      good luck

  25. QUESTION:
    How can a diabetic control sugar level while swimming?
    I'm 53 (MALE). Drugs taken:Glibenclamide (5 mg/day), Gemfibrozile (1200 mg / day), prozac (40 mg/day), trazadone HCl (50 mg/day). Average sugar level in blood: 120-140 at the time of waking up in the morning.
    wHEN i WALK FOR MORE THAN 15 MINUTES i START FEELING VERY COLD AND IRRITABLE.

    • ANSWER:
      When that happens, you are going hypoglycemic.

      I realize that conventional health care is necessary and appropriate. That having been said, there are many things WE can do to overcome type II diabetes, and improve life as a Type I diabetic. I've been researching alternative medicine, and the amount of help that's available to diabetics is amazing.

      Natural remedies are quite effective, and include:

      Cinnamon
      Bitter Melon
      Gymnema Sylvestre
      Nopal cactus
      American Ginseng
      Fenugreek
      Chromium picolinate

      Cinnamon regulates glucose, and has a polyphenol compound called MHCP that mimics insulin and activates cell receptor sites. A quarter teaspoon twice daily makes a difference. Fenugreek increases blood flow and inhibits the growth of infectious organisms. Everything on the list has a use in fighting diabetes. Learn how to use these herbs and don't fall victim to diabetes needlessly.You can find out about about them on line, or in a book I read cover to cover--

      "One Son's Quest for the Cause and Cure of Diabetes", ISBN 7890766313

      The author, a doctor, lost his mother to diabetes and spent the next 20 years finding a way to overcome it. My brother was dying of diabetes, and I was just starting to need insulin when we came across this definitive work which came out in February 2005. We both lead mostly normal lives now. It's a life saver, and the best money you'll ever spend on the subject if you decide to go that way.
      You might want to check Abe Books, Alibri's, or Amazon.com for a good used copy cheap. I bought mine new, and I think it was about . I don't get any money from anybody for telling you this--just want to help, and the techniques in this book is what made the difference for me and mine. Best of luck.

  26. QUESTION:
    Typical blood sugar levels for a 17 year old girl?
    For the past two weeks, I've been extremely exhausted and weak, as well as disoriented while driving. One morning I started shaking really bad like I'd be cold or nervous, when I was neither. I described this to one of my teachers and she said that's how her daughter was and she had low blood sugar. I then looked at the signs of it and have like every one lately.

    What I don't understand is why would I start feeling like this suddenly, when I haven't changed any of my lifestyle habits?

    Out of curiosity, my mother checked my blood sugar earlier and it was 103. I had ate 2 peppermint patties and a satsuma not too long before. What is the average range for a seventeen year old girl?

    I don't think it was low, however, because I wasn't feeling very "off" like I usually do, when she took it.

    • ANSWER:
      103 is prefectly fine. Not too high, not too low. 103 would not cause you to feel disoriented or shaky. Low blood sugar is under 70.

  27. QUESTION:
    What are considered high blood sugar levels for a 15 year old girl?
    The doctor told me that my average is 80 and my low is 60 but she didn't tell me what my high is. I just came back from a Christmas party and I feel really sick. I think I ate too much sugar. I tested my sugar and it's 105. Is this okay? I feel really sick to my stomach. Please help! I don't know what to do. I'm not diabetic but I'm close to it so I have one of those blood pricker things! What do I do?

    • ANSWER:
      105 is fine. It's common for even non diabetics to have higher reading of 130ish shortly after eating a high carb meal.
      Why do you think you are close to having diabetes?

  28. QUESTION:
    For dietician...Does anyone know how many carbs raise the blood sugar ? points in a diabetic?
    I am of average activity level and am diabetic. I like low-carb diets. I am just curious whether or not anyone truly has information as to how many carbs it takes to raise a diabetic's blood sugar level by, say, 20 points or such? In other words...If my blood sugar was 135, and I eat something with, say 6 carbs (1/2 cup green beans or such), how much would be blood sugar go up without meds? Does this make any sense to anyone? Does anyone have an answer for me? There must be some sort of medical formula. I am thinking along the lines of heat raised in the body to burn calories or something.

    • ANSWER:
      it is different in each person and it takes much testing to determine.

      For my insulin pump I take 1 unit of insulin for every 3.5 grams of carbs I eat.

      When I take 1 unit of insulin my blood sugar drops 25mg/dL.

      So, technically, my blood sugar goes up 25 points for every 3.5g of carbs I eat.

      In addition to being a type 1 diabetic, I also am very insulin resistant. Many type 1 diabetics would take much less insulin than I would.

  29. QUESTION:
    I was diagnosed with diabetes last Nov 2007. What is the normal average of sugar if and when you are diabetic?
    I was diagnosed with diabetes last Nov 2007. I was given a medicine for diabetes 2. I don't know about diabetes 1 and 2, both have the same symptoms. What is the normal average of sugar if and when you are diabetic? Sometimes my blood sugar is 110, 115, 126 and my worst is 140. What is my status? Is my sugar still normal or I have to maintain the normal sugar? What is my average sugar level to maintain? Is it advisable to monitor my sugar twice in a week? Before I check my sugar, I make sure I did fast for 8 hours. Sorry if I ask too much about diabetes and diabetic issues.

    • ANSWER:
      Different medical organizations set different standards, but a good 'shorthand' is to stay as close to 100 as possible and to try to avoid going over 140. If you can get your fastings near or below 100 and your two-hour after-meals readings <140, then I think you'll be in a good position.

      Diabetics who are not insulin dependent typically do not test as much as those who are, but twice in a week seems a little low to be testing. I would think something closer to twice a day would be better. If you're only testing twice a week, then you have no idea how foods are affecting you. A fasting and an after-dinner test should be enough for now. If you can afford it, 3-4 tests a day would provide you a lot of useful information about your diabetes.

      Because you only test your fasting blood sugar, you could be having spikes well over 200 or even 300 without knowing. It's important that you incorporate postprandial tests, too. (Postprandial means after meals.) How high you spike and how quickly you come down from meals are just as important as fasting.

  30. QUESTION:
    I'm 13 and my blood sugar is 59. What can I do to improve it?
    I am not diabetic. My doctor told me my blood sugar was very low, at 59, today after a blood test. I had had half or more of an Ensure before it, and that was all I'd eaten thus far, but that's what I usually have for breakfast. She said I should have more meals or snack more through out the day, but I have a very little appetite. What is the average blood sugar for my age, and what should I do to get there? Is there any risk of Diabetes with a low sugar level?
    First answerer, that's obvious. Please don't waste my time.
    Jesus, as much as I'd love that, I doubt that will help my general health xD

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor is correct--instead of eating 3 meals, you should eat 5 or more small meals a day. This does not mean you need to eat big meals, but snacks like almonds or an apple would work. You need to keep your blood sugar on an even level.
      Check out this site for thorough info about Hypoglycemia:
      http://www.gicare.com/pated/edtot19.htm

      Blood sugars on average range from the low 70's-99 in adolescents.

      Unfortunately, many people who experience Hypoglycemia will go on to get "impaired glucose tolerance" later in life. You may never get full-blown Diabetes.

      I had Hypoglycemia as a teenager---I was always tired. I ate lousy, would starve myself for days because I wasn't hungry.

      As an adult I was told I have "borderline diabetes". Both conditions have to do with your Pancreas and it's ability to convert foods.

      With both conditions, a change in diet is crucial for improving the way you feel.

  31. QUESTION:
    Blood sugar levels - please advise.?
    In November 2010, I realized that I had diabetes 2, and I can see that I might have been in that condition for over 2 years approximates from end of 2008, since I have experience weight loss since that time. My height is 6 feet and my weight at the start of 2008 was around 200, and now it is 170.

    Once I realized my situation, I visited my doctor. The A1C test showed a reading of 10.4 ( i.e. a reading of 252 mg/dl approx).

    In the last 6 months, I have put in a lot of work to change of diet, start excercising, increase my water intake. Currently my last one month readings ( around 30 readings) average is around 150. My morning reading fluctuate between 115 - 135.

    My diet currently includes the flow:

    1. 2 unripened bananas in the morning.
    2. Protein shake with 4 strawberries and soymilk in the morning.
    3. 2 eggs in the morning
    4. 2 Smart low carb Tortilla in the afternoon along with chicken.
    5. Almonds as snack in the evening.
    6. 2 smart low carb tortilla in the night along with a vegetable curry.

    My objective is to keep my blood sugars below 140 during day time, and around 110 early morning.

    Please advise.

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with TheOrange Evil, and would add that most people are insulin resistant in the morning. So mornings are the worst time to eat any kind of carb. If I were you, I would lose the bananas, or at the very least, don't eat them in the morning when they will probably spike your blood sugar the most.

      Also, if going lower-carb doesn't help you with your blood sugars, it might be time to discuss further avenues of treatment with your doctor.

  32. QUESTION:
    Blood sugar going wacky, could someone help? Has this happened to anyone else? (please read details)?
    My blood sugar is giving me trouble. The dr's say I'm not diabetic but I have been checking sugar daily.
    When I eat even 1 bite of a cookie I get severe headache, I stay away from pop, sweets etc.
    After eating a meal feel like passing out, it get almost impossible to stay awake.
    Was told to test 2 hrs after eating, but always normal range then.
    Started checking 20 min after eating, and every 20 min up to I hr which is my peak (as far as I can tell) By 1hr 15min sugar drops. Sometimes this goes faster, but this is the average.
    My sugar levels have been...
    FASTING 12 hrs, after eating carbs the night before it's around low 60's. FASTING after eating meat the night before high 70's-80's.
    Tonight ate tuna cheese caserole, sugar 174 within 1/2 hr after eating, 140 in 45min, and 120 in 1hr.
    Night before burgers and hashbrowns, 25min 143, 1hr 185, 1&1/2 hrs 175.
    How could the sugar go so low and then jump that high?
    What could be wrong?
    Dr's say tests they do are ok. (help)

    • ANSWER:
      Blood sugars often fall after eating sugar - it will spike up then dramatically fall. It sounds like you have low sugars going on which is usually what happens to people before they become diabetic. After being low for several years people often become diabetic. Also it depends on what you eat - breads, potatoes, etc. that will get into the blood stream and stay longer. Often blood sugars today reflect what was eaten the day before. Keep a log of what was ate, when, how much and fsbs for a couple of weeks and you will probably see a pattern. To avoid low blood sugars at night you could make a half of pb sand. Hope this helps.

  33. QUESTION:
    Glucose levels and the hemoglobin A1C: Is this logical?
    Glucose levels and the hemoglobin A1C: Is this logical?
    Say you are a person who is diabetic and you consistently do not eat from 6am-6pm, but have breakfast before 6 am and dinner after 6 pm, would the skipping of meals " hide" your high blood sugar levels when you do eat. In other words, would skipping meals bring the average glucose level lower than the "true" average?

    • ANSWER:
      The hemogloblin A1C is the average of your blood glucose level over the last few months, no matter what time you eat. It is the "true" average.

  34. QUESTION:
    Is this glucose/blood sugar level high enough to be at rick for diabetes?
    I just got a blood test done for my anemia but they also told be my blood sugar is high.
    it's an AVERAGE of 6.6mmol/L, i think that's 119mg/dl... i think

    Am i at risk?

    • ANSWER:
      Normal Fasting Blood Sugar
      A normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is:

      83 mg/dl (4.6 mmol/L) or less.

      Many normal people have fasting blood sugars in the mid and high 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) range.

      Though most doctors will tell you any fasting blood sugar under 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) is "normal", there are several studies that suggest that testing with a fasting blood sugar in the mid 90 mg/dl (5 mmol/L) range often predicts diabetes that is diagnosed a decade later.
      Post-Meal Blood Sugar (Postprandial)
      Independent of what they eat, the blood sugar of a truly normal person is:

      Under 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L) one or two hours after a meal.

      Most normal people are under 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) two hours after eating.
      A1c
      A truly normal A1c is between 4.6% and 5.4%

      A1cs are not as good a measure of actual blood sugar control in individuals as they are for groups. An A1c of 5.1% maps to an average blood sugar of 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) or less when group statistics are analyzed, but normal variations in how our red blood cells work make the A1cs of truly normal individuals fall into a wider range.

      Some people's A1cs are always a bit higher than their measured blood sugars would predict. Some are always lower. NOTE: If you are anemic your A1c will read much lower than your actual blood sugars and the resulting A1c is not a useful gauge of your actual blood sugar control.

      Yes . High. You need to worry. Maybe start on a Low glycemic Index diet and start to exercise.

      Tin

  35. QUESTION:
    Those with diabetes can you take this interview?
    i have to interview diabetic for my senior project can you please take your time and answer them?

    1. what type do you have?
    2. what age were you diagnosed?
    3.what diet do you have to follow?
    4. how many times do you check you blood sugar?
    5. do you take medications or insulin? and how much?
    6.how has diabetes effect you in your activities?
    7. do you have any family hystery of this disease?
    8.what is your average blood sugar level?
    9.how long have you had this disease?
    10. how were you diagnosed?

    • ANSWER:
      1) I have type 1
      2) I was diagnosed a month after turning 13
      3) I do not follow a specific diet, i just count how many carbs i eat and take insulin to cover those carbs.
      4) I check my blood sugar level between 4 to 10 times a day, depending on how I am feeling.
      5) I take insulin (Humalog) via an insulin pump. I use between 30 and 60 units of insulin per day.
      6) Diabetes does not affect my activities a lot, but when my blood sugar gets too low or too high, I feel bad and that slows me down. When I am low, I feel absolutely horrible and have to stop whatever I am doing to get it back up. When I am high, I just need to sit down because I get really uncomfortable (have you ever had that feeling in your stomach that something bad is about to happen? i feel like that) and my mouth starts to taste really bad.
      7) No one in my family has any type of diabetes.
      8) My average level is about 200, my a1c is around 8.
      9) I have had diabetes for almost 4 years
      10) I was diagnosed because I had a physical (and coincidentally was feeling quite miserable that day) and after doing a urine sample and finding ketones, i was sent to the E.R.

  36. QUESTION:
    Will alcohol (previous evening) affect results of fasting blood sugar level?
    Should drinking a wine cooler the evening before testing (fasting as of midnight) possible effect the results of blood sugar level and possibly show a higher 4 month average? Mine was 162

    • ANSWER:
      Cody,
      I cannot say what alcohol will do to your A1c levels, but I read some recent research that explained that alcohol will lower your blood sugar immediately after consumption (even to dangerously low levels), then raise it to dangerously high levels 12 hours later. It's not worth the suffering for just a little bit of fun.

      I believe I read the research in either:

      http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com

      or
      http://www.dlife.com

  37. QUESTION:
    What's the best way to stabilize the blood sugar level?
    My grandma is diabetic & she is above 65 years old. & Lately (especially this past week) she has been having problems. She's had high blood pressure lately & unstable blood sugar levels (extremely high to extremely low). Problem is we don't know what to do to get it back in line. She used to have it in control with an average of around 100-150 glucose level way back when. Now, it's either extremely high or extremely low. She eats well, no sugar (unless the glucose level goes low) & low carbs. She exercises & walks a lot (although she is getting weaker & her feet are starting to hurt). Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      grammar_cleopatra,
      People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. Diabetic neuropathy can be classified as peripheral, autonomic, proximal, or focal. Each affects different parts of the body in various ways. Peripheral neuropathy, the most common type of diabetic neuropathy and which fits the description that you give of your grandma’s symptoms, causes pain or loss of feeling in the toes, feet, legs, hands, and arms. Autonomic neuropathy causes changes in digestion, bowel and bladder function, sexual response, and perspiration. It can also affect the nerves that serve the heart and control blood pressure, as well as nerves in the lungs and eyes. Autonomic neuropathy can also cause hypoglycemia unawareness, a condition in which people no longer experience the warning symptoms of low blood glucose levels. Proximal neuropathy causes pain in the thighs, hips, or buttocks and leads to weakness in the legs. Focal neuropathy results in the sudden weakness of one nerve or a group of nerves, causing muscle weakness or pain. Any nerve in the body can be affected. I will add a link below which may be helpful to you in your quest for the answers to your question, it contains internal links. I wish you and your grandma well.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Here is the link that I mentioned above

      http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/DM/
      pubs/complications_control/index.htm

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  38. QUESTION:
    Type 2 Diabetes: Blood sugar level reducing from above 300 to 150 - 180 range?
    Over the last 2 years I have been losing weight, almost 25 pounds, my waist reduced by almost 2 inches, and during this period started feeling very tired during all day. Finally I visited my family primary care physician in Oct 2010. After lab test I realized that I had type 2 diabetes condition, with my blood sugar levels about 286 ( after lunch).

    Primary care physician referred me to a endocronologist, who wanted to put me on insulin ( a dose of 16 ) straight away. I did not like the idea. My reason was that, now that I know the cause of what is going wrong in my body, I need to give myself a chance to do all that is possible to redress the situation for a couple of months, and at that stage re-assess and take the decesion to get on to insulin.

    It has been two weeks since I started making changes to my life style like switching to low glycemic foods ( of below 40 ), and exercising on a daily basis at a medium level, and checking my blood sugar using ONE touch Ultra2 on a daily basis ( at least 8 to 10 times) to understand the increase and decrease in blood sugar levels in response to my eating times, excercise, stress etc. The other big change I have brought about is to give up battles in my mind which I dont need to fight, out of all the changes this has proved to be tough and is still proving to be tough.

    To my surprise and happiness, Im seeing my blood sugar levels dropping as a result of my above efforts. During the course of my monitoring I realized that there is a upper cap of my blood sugar in 320s and lower cap in early 200s. This was before 2 weeks.

    Since the time I have been eating low glycemic breakfast lunch dinner, lots of water, excercise at least once a day ( 40 minute brisk walk), my blood sugar levels have gone down to a range of 114 to 197. Since the last 4 days there has been only once instance when my blood sugar went above 200.

    My early morning reading i.e. fasting reading is still high it is averaging about 130 - 140 over the last 10 days, my after meal reading is average between 155-175.

    3. questions:

    1. What should I do to reduce my early morning i.e. on fast without food or water reading ? I want to bring it down to around 75 to 85.

    2. I have reduced carbs which has helped a lot, and switched to salads and meat. But body also needs carbs. What are the best sources of carbs in my context?

    3. I have observed that even though my blood sugar is less than 140 ( which is the standard for after meal) or in specific between 120 and 140, I feel some level of dizziness, and also some head ache early in the morning. Is this because of the reason that my blood sugar levels are coming back to normal after a long time i.e. I might have been in the 200s and early 300s for a long time, and over the last couple of weeks due to changes made to food and excercise it is being in the range of 130s - 180s ?? Is my body in the process of getting adjusted to the new relatively low blood sugar levels ?

    What are the symptoms we should expect when blood sugars are coming down to relatively low level from higher levels?

    Thanks in advance.

    OTN
    Just want to add that my urine still smells sweet and is yellow in color. At what stage can I expect this to reduce. Note that when my blood sugar level is less than 150, the sweet smell in the urine goes down and the urine color is also light.
    My early morning fasting reading is the issue here. It is averaging around 150 to 160 over the last 2 weeks i.e. since I started taking low glycemic foods, excercise daily. Im quite sure it must have been much higher earlier. I want to tackle this area first, please suggest. What and when should I be eating the evening before to get my early morning readings to around 120 which is my first goal, before trying for 90.

    Im not on any medication.

    My readings during the day i.e. after breakfast, lunch, dinner currently are 150 to 160 before , and 2 hours later they settle at the same i.e.150-160 or go a little lower into 140s.

    It is obvious that I should be tackling my early morning readings first.

    • ANSWER:
      You seem to be on the right track.. But you never mentioned if you are taking Metformin.
      Here's the Key:

      There are 4 key steps to controlling glucose levels :

      1) EXERCISE- Walking is fine but Nordic Walking is Great. Exercise also lowers Glucose levels , lowers Cholesterol and lowers Blood Pressure. Google it.Exercise is Non-Negotiable !!!Thats why it is Number 1 on the list.
      2) Knowledge- http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/index.ph… This is a great site for info
      diet- A low carb diet is in order. I can't count carbs so I use Mendosa's Glycemic Index Diet. Great for the whole family. http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm
      3) Meds. Metformin to start. Never , ever take Actos or Avandia. They may kill you. Bone fractures, heart problems and what diabetics really don't need is that they change Bone Stem Cells to Fat Cells.
      4) Diet- A low carb diet is in order. I can't count carbs so I use Mendosa's Glycemic Index Diet. Great for the whole family. http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm

      My fasting is 96 and HBA1C is 5.2.
      There are no miracles, just attitude and dedication. If you have depression , treat it . Because when depressed you don't take care of yourself properly.

      Take care

      TIN

  39. QUESTION:
    How to decrease Sugar level...?
    My grandmother who is around 60 - 65 years, is having high sugar in blood, the average sugar level is 100, and her level is 550!!!
    Please help me, or I will lose my grandma..!
    She is having a large block in her heart, she had 2 blocks in heart before, we did antioplasty and antiogram and removed those blocks.
    Doctor said that there is a chance for an attack, she is basically dull, because her mom dead just before 2-3 weeks..
    i will make her eat anything to get rid of this sugar...

    Help Please........................!!!!!!!!!!
    I wanna know what all food she should eat, what she should'nt, what exercises she should do, what she should not do,,,

    Such dos and do nots

    • ANSWER:
      ask her to avoid all tea coffee with sugar ,potato ,food with oil butter,ghee etc ask her to drink bitter guard juice eat blackberrys seed powder please immediately consult a good: diabetes specilist he may suggest some medicine or insulin to bring sugar level down and also suggest a diet chart because this is a very high level only good doctor can help and go according to his advise

  40. QUESTION:
    blood test questions, a bit worried but lets see what you guys have to say about this.?
    I ate breakfast at around 8-9am. I got my blood taken at around 1 pm. My glucose level came out to be 102. what i eat for breakfast was cheese with salmon fish with bread 2 of these i ate for breakfast. The nurse asked me if i was fasting i said no i ate breakfast and i got a copy of the results back saying that i told them i was fasting, anyways does this mean that i have diabetes? Please let me know..thank you people..normal range it says it has to be from 70-99, dont talk about prediabetes or anything just let me know the thing whats going on...can it be cause i was scared during the procedure cause i'm scared of doctors and medical stuff or can it be cuz i ate breakfast? please let me know thanks and what should be the normal fasting sugar level and what should be on average a blood sugar level taken at random, thanks.?

    • ANSWER:

  41. QUESTION:
    Blood test questions, a bit worried but lets see what you guys have to say about this.?
    I ate breakfast at around 8-9am. I got my blood taken at around 1 pm. My glucose level came out to be 102. what i eat for breakfast was cheese with salmon fish with bread 2 of these i ate for breakfast. The nurse asked me if i was fasting i said no i ate breakfast and i got a copy of the results back saying that i told them i was fasting, anyways does this mean that i have diabetes? Please let me know..thank you people..normal range it says it has to be from 70-99, dont talk about prediabetes or anything just let me know the thing whats going on...can it be cause i was scared during the procedure cause i'm scared of doctors and medical stuff or can it be cuz i ate breakfast? please let me know thanks and what should be the normal fasting sugar level and what should be on average a blood sugar level taken at random, thanks.?

    • ANSWER:
      102 is not that high, it is most probably because of the stress your fear put you under.

      If you ate more than three hours before the test, then it was not because of what you ate.
      If you ate within 3 hours before the test, then that can also cause your test to show this slight elevation.

      From 9 am to 1 pm is four hours, so the food did not influence it at all. Unless you had a snack or drink you can not remember.

      I would not even think twice about a test of 102. Only when it start reaching 120, then there is really reason for concern.

  42. QUESTION:
    What is a truly normal blood sugar number?
    I was having some symptoms of diabetes and tested my blood sugar with my dads meter (he has type 2) my fasting level was 97 and 2 hours after I ate it was 120. I tested again before my next meal 5 hours later and it was 140. I went to my doctor because my dad said that 140 was too high. Especially since I hadn't eaten in so long and when I did eat it was just a sandwich. My first doctor did a fasting glucose test and it was 99. She said I was fine and was making up not feeling well. So I went to another doctor. This one said that the FGT wasn't accurate for diagnosis so she did an A1C test. She didn't tell me what the number for that was, but that I wasn't diabetic. Then I was talking to my friend who's been a type 1 diabetic for 9 years and she said that the A1C showed your average over the last 3 months. I haven't been feeling sick over the last 3 months, and it had only been a couple weeks that I had been feeling bad when they did the test. She said it might not have been accurate enough. Is that true? I've been eating very carefully all year and exercising (my New Years resolution was to loose 40 pounds and I did it!) And since I noticed slightly higher blood sugar levels I've been really watching the carbs and I eat no more refined sugar. I'm still feeling bad though. Sometimes it's not too bad, but other times I'm just SO thirsty and I have to go to the bathroom all the time, and my legs and arms have been getting really cramped up lately. Then I was getting dizzy and getting headaches. I have like no energy at all most of the time. And I get hungry, and then when I eat I feel worse. I'm not overweight and I'm very active. But type 1 and 2 run on both sides of my family. Could I be in the process of getting one or the other? Can higher levels be a warning that type 1 is coming, or only type 2? Can I even get type 2 if I'm normal weight and eating right? There are only 2 doctors in my town and I went to them both already. Do I need to find another doctor or just wait until my current doctor feels like re-testing me. Or is there something I can do myself to know if I really even need to go back right away? I keep hearing that normal fasting is anything under 126 and anything under 200 after eating. But if so, why are the "normal ranges" 70-120? I'm just really confused! Can someone help me, please? :)

    • ANSWER:
      Hello my friend,

      You have a lot of questions and rightfully so. I am a type 2 diabetic and can relate to some of the symptoms you are talking about.

      There is a great book called Dr Bernstein's Diabetes Solution by Dr Richard K Bernstein.

      He is a type 1 diabetic and has been so since he was a child, he is now in his 70's.

      He covers a lot of the questions you have.

      By the way normal blood sugars are around 75 - 85 (that's where non diabetics usually are).

      I just checked Amazon for his book and they have it for only .79 (normally .99). This is for his latest book. You can also purchase his older books, they have valuable information in them as well.

      I hope this helps.

      Ollie G

  43. QUESTION:
    If im hypoglycemic can I eat more calories daily than the average person?
    Since Im hypoglycemic, meaning under normal levels of blood sugar, does that mean I need to eat more sugar than the normal person (because I know I have to eat more times daily than the average person) so does that mean I am allowed a higher daily caloric intake than 2,000 calories??

    • ANSWER:
      hi there.. please ignore our resident NUTCASE that talks about the acaiberry supplment..

      yes if u are hyperglycemic u need to eat more... u need to eat high protein foods, and complex carbs this will slowly release your blood sugar and keep your energy steady... with the proteins.. avoiding very sugary foods.. and too many simple carbs...

      u know what to do..

  44. QUESTION:
    Is there reason for concern or is everything just fine?
    My oldest son is 36 yrs old and, he keeps me in his house because, I do not make enough money to live on my own anymore.
    He is always complain about being sick just like me. So, I decided to test his BP, Blood sugar levels, and blood pressure for three days to see if he might of inherited my diabetes.
    His blood Pressure Average: 115/75 Pulse Rate: 70
    Blood Sugar Levels average over three morning: 165 mg/dl
    Urine test average: 10 -15 mg/dl ketones
    Weight:255 lbs
    Height: 5 feet 10 inches
    BMI ?
    Gets really thirsty at night and keep large mug of water at beside each night.
    80 -85 lbs over weight.
    The emergency room nurse tell me over the telephone that these readings are all normal and there is nothing to worry about. What do you all think of this situation?
    Blood readings at 4:00 AM in the mornings
    Urine test before bedtime and in early morning time.
    Blood glucose reading were took after 6 - 7 hrs of fasting over night

    • ANSWER:
      Blood pressure looks fine.
      If the blood sugar level is when he has not eaten for 12 hours (he can drink water) then that it a bit high or at the very least boarder line for diabetes. Not sure about ketones.
      If the doctor's say that he is not diabetic, then he is probably boarderline and should
      (1) try to loose some weight
      (2) eat healthy foods with less sugar and carbohydrates that break down more slowly (eg casava). There are lots of tasty foods that are low in sugar. He can probably consult with a dietitian.

      I am not a professional, nor a diabetic... but I know many people who are diabetic (including my grandmother and some of my aunts/uncles) so I have been exposed to some of the information.

  45. QUESTION:
    I'm not diabetic but I still have high blood sugar readings, why is this?
    Diabetes runs in the family. My mother, sister, gran, etc all have it. Randomly I did a blood check (the pinprick machine) one morning and I had 7.0 (very high before breakfast considering it should be between 4 and 6). So I had a slice of wholegrain toast and went from 9 to 3 without eating. Did another pinprick test and I got 11.2, I'm like "woah". So I go to the doctor's and they say "right, fasting blood glucose check". I waited a few days, did the fasting blood test and controlled my sugar levels throughout the week by eating very healthily, counting carbs and taking cinnamon tablets to help lower blood sugar. Although still very slightly high they weren't as bad - I was waking up with 4.5 and 2 hours after wholegrain I had 6.2. On Tuesday I received my results and I was absolutely fine - my average is 5.5 and the range was from 3.5 - 6. Thinking that I was back to normal I went to university and had lasagne and lots of coffee. I got back just now (3 hours after eating), washed my hands, did a pinprick test and I got 16.2... in a few words, what on earth is going on? Are my results wrong? :(

    • ANSWER:
      Every doctor seems to have different ideas of what is the "ideal" sugar levels.
      Some say 4 to 6 mmol others say 5 to 7 mmol, so do not stress too much on the reading of 7.

      The pinprick machine is not totally reliable, it could also give false readings.This is my first reaction to the reading of 16.2 - you could also be stressed, tired or some other reason, I would not worry too much about that. After all one swallow does not make a summer.

      Your "formal" tests at the doctors turned out to be OK, so do not worry about it anymore.
      If you are concerned have the test re-done every 6 months or so.

      In the mean time, continue as if you have diabetes i.e eat healthy and exercise regularly.
      Why? because
      1)everybody on this planet should eat healthy and exercise.
      2)if you are comfortable with this healthy lifestyle when/if you do become diabetic, then no big deal - been there done that. No real change needed.
      3) A healthy lifestyle would most probably prevent the onset of diabetes in the first place.

  46. QUESTION:
    Diabetics, what have you learned that helps you keep you blood sugar level?
    I know what I did is crazy but now I am starting over again & would like to know what others have done. I went off my meds in Dec. I have had all kinds of problems & it is complicated. I was on glimerperide ( something like that) & metformin. When I would go to the Dr. thinks looked good I was averaging about 117 last time I went. Which was great for me. I was still not on a perfect diet. I have had a hard time every year in Dec. which was the month my son passed away & other dates that just get me depressed. I am going for therapy about this. Ok, now I am getting back on metformin & just had dinner & felt I was low but tested in at about 408. I did not like that the aveage I had when I was taking better care of myself was based on numbers that went up & down. I hated having low blood sugar. So is it possible to get more balanced. What is your day like if you don't mind giving an example of an average day. I would appreciate any details you can share. Your schedule, supplements. drinking water, exercise, anything. Thank you so much!

    • ANSWER:
      All I have done to bring mine down from 1400 in March 09 to 107 today, was, stopped sugar, switched to whole grain bread, brown or wild rice, and did major portion control. I measured and weighed everything. I went by the diet my doc and nutritionist gave me. Soda's also went. I added fresh fruits for fiber. Also any processed foods went as well. As far as what I do during the day. I play on the computer mostly. I have COPD and I am in the end stage, so exercising is not really a choice I have. I do try to do some exercises, but it isn't many. I was having a problem with stress (my son has been deployed to Iraq) and I went and talked my the doc about it, and since stress can raise BG he gave me zanax to keep me calm. I also check my BG 4 times a day as instructed, and I am no longer taking any meds, no insulin, no glyburide, and no metformin. I maintain my BG by checking as instructed and adjusting my food for the day if necessary, but that has only been on two occassions, and both times, it was my fault, for eating a extra serving. I also went to a site called, fitday.com, and use that site to track all my food intake. That site allows me to know how many carbs I am at for the day, the number of calories, the fat, and all nutrition information. I couldn't of have done or stuck to my diet without using them. I also use a site called; dlife.com for recipes as all their recipes have the nutritional values given as well. Hope some of this helps you. Good luck.

      PS. I have also lost 17 pounds since March 23rd as of today, and that is just by diet alone. I still have to lose some more, but I will get to my goal.

  47. QUESTION:
    i know someone that is a 50+ yr old male & he is having diabetic symptoms- how can i help this at home?
    average blood sugar level is 5.6-ish
    the person i know is at 25.6 atm
    i just wanna know what i can do until he can get a new family doctor to help
    i need to know what diets he can do , he eats alot of bread so i know to cut that out and he is going to have to eat less sugar and all but he has been eating like crazy recently but has been losing weight .
    help please?
    **no links please**
    thaankss in advancce ♥
    thaank you so much
    thaankss guuys , you're advice acctually helped aloot , he's getting better slowly . very slowly . he's going to the doc soon .
    **atm = at the moment XD**

    • ANSWER:
      25.6 mmol/L is incredibly dangerous blood sugar. As you pointed out, it's about five times higher than normal blood sugar. The weight loss despite overeating is incredibly concerning because that's a classic diabetic symptom.

      Yes, he needs to cut out the bread and the sugar right now, as well as most carbohydrates. Any carbohydrates he eats should be in moderation and ideally from non-starchy vegetables, nuts, and seeds.

      With blood sugar that high, a walk around the block and low-carb diet are only going to do so much good. He should be taken to the hospital as soon as possible, especially in light of his weight loss, to be given emergency injections of insulin to bring his blood sugar down quickly. If he has insulin at home and knows how to administer it, then he might be able to do this himself.

  48. QUESTION:
    Is a blood sugar level of 2.2 bad?
    I received that from a blood test. I had had a meal an hour before I got the test done. I don't have diabetes or been diagnosed with anything like that.

    I am a 17yr old female. 170cm tall and 62kgs so average on BMI

    Thanks!
    I generally feel dizzy and shaky. She did describe it to me but didn't get much said because she wanted further testing first because she thought it was odd so I'm getting a GTT. When I describe to her how I felt, I explained it like being slightly drunk (like beingt tipsy, dizzy, hazy slurry speech sort of way)

    • ANSWER:
      I'm surprised that whatever health care provider did this test for you did not discuss this with you, as it is considered an "emergency" blood sugar level. The average person's sugar level rests between 4-7, depending on where the blood test catches you between meals, metabolism rate, etc. However, usually when a person's blood falls below 3 in a hospital setting they are provided with sugar tablets or some kind of carbohydrate to get that number back up.
      When people have a 2.2. for a blood sugar level they usually know it as they start to feel dizzy, shaky, disoriented and maybe even nauseous as their body struggles to perform it's natural functions with such a glucose deficit. If you didn't feel funny or have any symptoms when you got this blood sugar level then I would consider getting retested as it may have been wrong.

  49. QUESTION:
    Type 2 Diabetes, rapid weight loss, and D.A.F.N.E.?
    I was recently diagnosed as Type 2 diabetes in November, 2009.

    The problem I have is that there isn't much I can eat due to having high cholesterol too.
    I am losing about 5 pounds of weight a week.

    I will not eat vegetables so that is out.
    I am not on any medications whatsoever either. I can usually eat 10g to 15g of carbs without spiking too much.

    Anything more than that and I have to walk for 30 minutes for every 20g of carbs I eat. Since it's wintertime, I won't be able to walk if at all. I am not healthy enough to exercise indoors.

    What can I do to be able to eat so my rapid weight loss is slowed down? At the rate I am losing weight, I will be dead by this august.

    Remember, no carbs due to blood sugar problems, no fat or cholesterol due to high cholesterol & high triglycerides. And no veggies due to abuse issues when I was very young. I am now 49 years old. Chicken and fish will get really old really fast, no matter how you prepare it.

    I am very tired all the time too and my muscles scream in pain if I walk too much at one time or too many times a day.

    My doctor's office seems to be incompetent. They checked my lipid profile and did not check to see how much insulin I was actually making. They just assumed I was a Type 2 based on my GTT of 294. If not enough insulin, then I need that addressed. If plenty, then only insulin resistant.

    I want to use fast acting insulin for mealtime only - dose on eating. My last (and only) a1c was 6.8 .
    Diet and exercise just isn't going to work for me.
    My dietitian wants me to eat 75g of carbs 3 times a day plus 2 snacks. I refuse to do this as I do not want my blood sugars in the 300 range every day. I want to keep my eyes and toes and kidneys.

    Right now, my average blood sugars via testing are about 113 for the past month, and that's including the spikes.

    What can I eat to slow the rapid weight loss rate? Remember, NO VEGGIES, NO FAT, NO CHOLESTEROL, NO SUGAR, NO CARBS.

    Do I just knuckle under and eat anyway, hoping that I don't go blind to lose my toes? Or have a heart attack from too high a cholesterol level?

    If all it takes is an a1c level above 7.0 to get insulin, I can just eat a bunch of frosted cinnamon rolls every day.

    D.A.F.N.E. is Dose Ahead For Normal Eating. In essence, take a shot of insulin so you can eat and have a NORMAL life. I only want to eat one or two large meals a day, around 125-150g each. I am not looking to abuse insulin to have a sugary chocolate malt or anything. And maybe once a month eat a REAL meal, say about 250g of carbs like spaghetti and meatballs, or even pizza.

    I am ONLY diabetic when I eat. Not eating, and I have perfectly NORMAL blood sugar levels.

    What am I to eat? What am I to do? How do I convince my doctor to give me insulin and not pills? I want to save what's left of my beta cells for when I really need them, in my old age. Insulin will help this, but pills won't.

    I don't know how to get my doctor to accommodate my needs. Doctor shopping is too expensive.

    I am not living, I am existing. The treatment of diabetes is both to keep you alive AND restore some semblance of a normal life. I have neither. Eat, walk, eat, walk. Over and over every day.

    I am just in a quandary over this horrible disease.

    Any credible and practical suggestions?

    In 16 weeks I will weigh less than 80 pounds but should weigh at least 135-150.

    For me, Diabetes is a death sentence.

    • ANSWER:
      Get a new doctor.I hope you are seeing an endocrinologist as normal GPs really aren't that knowledgeable about diabetes.
      If you are at the stage of losing weight (called ketoacidosis) then you need treatment with insulin asap.
      If you are also insulin resistant you may have no choice but to go on pills - you said so yourself that diet and exercise just isn't working. Doesn't matter how much insulin you pump into your body if you are insulin resistant - it still cant use it. Although I think there is a type of insulin that is used for t2, called byetta or something. Ask your dr about that.

      Its very hard to cut carbs altogether from your diet; if you dont get enough, your body will convert protein into carbs. I really think you should seriously reconsider your stance on pills; at least till you can it undercontrol. Anyway, make an appt with a new endo right away!

  50. QUESTION:
    Hormones are released in the body in response to a Negative feedback. Why is it called Negative feedback ?
    The process is easy to understand but why negative and not positive ? What I mean is say your blood sugar level is above average, this will trigger realease of GHRH as if the body was saying YES, I need this hormone... as opposed to NO, I need this hormone ? Get my drift ?

    • ANSWER:
      Negative Feedback means that the lowering of one substance will cause the elevation of another; or the elevation of one substance will cause the lowering of another.

      It's like ACTH. Increased ACTH caused increased aldosterone, Now, if aldosterone increases, this will cause the levels of ACTH to decrease. This is called Negative Feedback. But if the increase in aldosterone cause the levels of ACTH to increase (which doesn't happen in life), then this is called Positive Feedback.

      Hope you got it.


Acceptable Levels Of Blood Sugar

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What's Acceptable Blood Sugar Levels in a Child?
    My 10 year old son's blood sugar level last week about 90mins after eating was 15.3 (275mmol). I thought this was a bit high so we've checked it a few times since.

    His fasting level before breakfast the other morning was 8.0 (144mmol) he hadn't eaten in around 13 hrs. Tonight 90mins after eating dinner he is showing 12.8 (230mmol)

    He doesn't seem to have excessive thirst and seems to pee normally but he can be tired and does complain of headaches and sore tummy's regularly.

    I've tried googling to get an idea if these readings are high (they're all higher than mine..I'm not diabetic but I'm 7mths pregnant and have been asked to check my levels for 10 days as I am fasting glucose intolerant) but can't find a definite answer. Most places seem to suggest this is too high for a child who is not diabetic.

    Any advice greatly received!

    • ANSWER:
      The diagnosis of diabetes is surprisingly straightforward. It doesn’t require many tests to rule out other possibilities. The following signs establish the diagnosis of diabetes:

      a urine test showing a lot of sugar and the presence of ketones
      symptoms such as extreme thirst and frequent urinating
      The following test confirms the diagnosis: a reliable laboratory blood sugar reading of more than 11.1 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) taken at any time of day. It doesn’t matter when the child last ate.

      It is not usually difficult to tell whether a child has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. By far most children and teens have type 1. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually start dramatically because the pancreas stops making insulin. Ketones are much more likely to be present in the urine in type 1 diabetes than in type 2. However, if there are no ketones it doesn’t mean that it isn’t type 1. Rather, it suggests that the child was diagnosed early, before ketones had the chance to form. Unfortunately, early diagnosis doesn’t mean that the child has a less severe case of diabetes, or that treatment will be easier.

      In rare cases, it can be difficult to determine whether the diagnosis is type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Other testing might include fasting insulin levels, genetic testing, or looking for immune markers of type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, there are certain antibodies in the body. They are created in response to the proteins on the pancreas cells that release insulin. If these markers are present, it suggests that the diabetes is more likely to be type 1. If no markers are present, it is more likely type 2 diabetes, but this is not a definite diagnosis.

      The recommended test for type 2 diabetes is called a fasting blood glucose test. This test checks blood glucose levels after your child hasn’t had anything to eat for at least eight hours. The doctor may also use a test called an oral glucose tolerance test.

      It would seem that your child is diabetic. Go to the website below and check it out.
      So many website have such Acceptable High Glucose levels, which are wrong. Any glucose level over 140 causes damage , whether adult or child.
      Good luck.

      Tin

  2. QUESTION:
    what are acceptable levels of blood sugar for type I diabetes?

    • ANSWER:
      mid 90s to about 140. 80s is getting a little low, 30s is getting dangerous, you usually pass out in the 20s. you start worrying about ketones in the 300s. though it varys from person to person.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is an acceptable blood sugar level for a man over 70? Thanks?
    My blood sugar level (fasting) is around 140. I am over 70. Some of my friends say it is OK at my age; others say it should be below 115. I don't take any medication for diabetes. Should I see a doctor or continue my life-style. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Blood sugar levels range from 60-120 these being acceptable levels. Anything below 60 can cause hypoglycemia which is not acceptable due to the that one can go into a coma and suffer from seizure episodes. Then we look at the other side of the coin if the blood sugar goes way past ove 200 to 500 then a person can go into a coma and die.. So the best point of this situation is to follow your diet, exercise, take your blood sugars at least twice a day.. If they are not in good range then you shoud follow-up with your family physician for further evaluation. Best of luck to you.

  4. QUESTION:
    My mom has type 2 Diabetes. What are the normal blood sugar ranges?
    What is acceptable (good) blood sugar levels for morning test prior to eating? 90 - 120?

    What is acceptable range during the course of the day?

    Any suggestions on recipes or meal plans that work well? I know their is no such hing as a diabetic diet but I know there are obviously things to avoid.

    • ANSWER:
      My doctor wants me 80 to 120 before meals and when I wake up in the morning.

  5. QUESTION:
    What is the highest "acceptable" blood sugar peak?
    After you eat a meal, how high should your blood sugar go? Even if it returns to "normal" levels within 2 hours, what is the highest peak that is OK? Is anything OK as long as it returns to normal? My daughter is having peaks in the 225-250 range on a fairly regular basis (she is 4 and of normal weight), but her bg does usually come down within 2-3 hours.
    I should add that she does not have a diagnosis of diabetes and that all of these readings are with a home meter. She has seen an endocrinologist who is not concerned because there are no documented venous blood draws over 200.
    Fasting blood sugar is almost always normal. It is the postprandial blood sugars that are well over 200.

    • ANSWER:
      i believe that a fasting blood sugar test should be obtained, and there has to be several readings before she could actually be diagnosed as a "diabetic". just watch for signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia(high blood sugar) increased thirst, increased urination, increrased hunger, fatigue, dry mouth, blurred vision, change in mental status.

  6. QUESTION:
    Blood sugar levels - need clarification please?
    My mother and father are both diabetic and have been for years. Recently they resumed testing their sugar every couple hours, and I haven't tested mine in about a year, so I was curious about my blood sugar level. So before eating this morning at around 8am, I tested my sugar and the tester came up with a level of 44. It was strange to me and I called my dietitian. She told me to eat something and get back to her after I tested my sugar again 1-2 hours after eating. The monitor came up with a value of 90. I've not been able to get back to her since then, but I'm wondering - is this something I should be concerned about? Is this possibly a pre-diabetic condition or is a level like this relatively acceptable?
    1. I am 22 years old, have not been diagnosed with diabetes and both my parents are type 2 diabetics for at least the past 10 years.

    2. Recently, I have been sleeping at least two hours more than usual. I would wake up at night about twice but usually I would soon fall back asleep. However, sometimes I will not be able to sleep after waking up, Two nights ago, I went to bed at 10pm and woke up at 3am and even though very tired, I was unable to fall back asleep. Upon coming home last night I could barely keep my eyes open and was visibly nodding off on the way home. I woke up not sleepy, but exhausted this morning.

    3. I am not someone who enjoys sweet things. That being said, I've been having a pretty open appetite lately and it seems that when I eat, I gravitate towards breads and sweet foods.

    4. In addition, I have had astigmatism for many years, but lately I've found myself having to put my eyes right up to the computer or television to make out the words. There's been a noticeab
    Additional: I'm sorry but yahoo answers cuts off my details for some reason.

    To re-iterate point 4:

    4. In addition, I have had astigmatism for many years, but lately I've found myself having to put my eyes right up to the computer or television to make out the words. There's been a noticeable deterioration in my eyesight over the past couple weeks. I find difficulty driving lately, even with my glasses.

    Thank you to those who have answered so far, it's appreciated (except the spammer).
    Also friends, please note that diabetics don't only suffer from high blood sugar :/ Overproduction of insulin results in low blood sugar which can be a malfunction of the pancreas as well.

    • ANSWER:
      The reason your dietitian advised you to have something to eat and then get back to her is because your blood glucose level was low enough to be termed a hypoglycemic event. (That just indicates lower than 'normal' blood glucose level.)

      Unfortunately, with having both parents with type 2 diabetes DOES put you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes yourself. Some people MAY experience the hypoglycemic events, just as you did, prior to developing hyperglycemia ... higher than 'normal' blood glucose levels. It's when the hyperglycemia becomes persistent that a diagnosis would be made ... assuming that doctors don't catch it at an earlier stage where some doctors call it pre-diabetes. (Not all agree with the use of that term, stating that you're either diabetic or you're not.)

  7. QUESTION:
    Best supplement (or possibly medication...) to bring blood sugar down to healthier levels again?
    Hiya :)

    Basically - I'll pop to the docs for a test of this again soon, and probably use a home tester too - but I have reason to believe my blood sugar is a bit too high. Not far too high, not type 2 diabetes kind of level but... just the higher end of the acceptable range. I was wondering what people might suggest for effectively but healthily keeping my blood sugar levels under control. So something that won't make them go to low or anything, but will effectively reduce them to healthy levels.

    I've seen many combo supplements on ebay and have heard about things like lipoic acid, but just wondered what you all thought.

    Don't worry I intend to test again, also I have done a lot of research and believe I have pretty good reason to suspect this is a considerable issue for me at the moment.

    Thanks very much,

    Mike :)

    • ANSWER:
      Low carb diet.

  8. QUESTION:
    Pick two of the following physiological characteristics and describe how they are regulated.?
    Human body systems work together to maintain homeostasis. Each system might have multiple feedback loops that keep body conditions within a narrow range. Pick two of the following physiological characteristics and describe how they are regulated. Explain how the different levels are sensed, how the elements are increased or decreased to maintain acceptable levels, and what would be the results of poor regulation of these two characteristics.

    Body temperature
    Blood-sugar levels
    Blood-oxygen levels
    Blood-water levels

    • ANSWER:
      Body temperature = is regulated by the hypothalamus in the brain. It serves as a thermostat, initiating physiological measures to lose or gain heat. Heat is conserved by constriction of the small arteries supplying blood to tiny capillaries near the surface of the skin. This reduces blood flow in the capillaries. To lose heat, small arteries dilate, increasing blood flow in the capillaries. Heat is lost from them. As sweat is produced the evaporation of the water from the sweat cools the skin.

      Blood sugar Level = is regulated by two pancreatic hormones, namely insulin and glucagon. insulin is released; it binds to receptors and, through signal transduction, results in an increase in glucose uptake by cells, effectively lowering blood glucose. When blood sugar decreases, glucagon is released, binds to cell receptors, and causes glucose to be released into circulation. Diabetes mellitus is a disorder that results from excessively high levels of blood glucose. Type II diabetics have normal to elevated levels of insulin. What, then, might be causing the elevated blood glucose levels. Blood sugar rises because The elevated glucose level is caused by the inability of the cells to "take in " the glucose and use it for energy. The glucose continues to circulate in the blood. It is more a problem with the receptivity of the cells that with hormone imbalances.

      blood water, i cant explain... but here are some info..

      Water is gained from:
      (1) Ingestion
      (2) Oxidation of organic nutrients.
      Water is lost from
      (1) Skin via sweat glands
      (2) Respiratory passageways
      (3) Gastrointestinal tract
      (4) Urinary tract. Water and salt balance is primarily a result of regulation through urinary loss.

      Water excreted = Water filtered - Water reabsorbed
      Water excretion is regulated mainly at the level of reabsorption by vasopressin.

  9. QUESTION:
    Is this normal blood sugar: 80's before breakfast; 90's before lunch?
    Hi, doctor is having me monitor my blood-sugar (possible hypoglycemia). It is consistently in the 80's before breakfast. Before lunch, consistently mid-90's. Are these acceptable levels?

    I'm seeing that doctor today and want to go in with an idea of whether or not my levels seem reasonable.

    • ANSWER:
      A NON diabetics normal range for blood sugars are 70 to 100 fasting and 70 to 120 2 hours after a meal. Sounds like yours are fine. Hypoglycemia is not always a consistant thing. It can bother you one day, but not the next. It is usually worse during warmer months when you are more active. I was hypoglycemic from age 11 til I was diagnosed with diabetes when I was almost 40. Many times being hypoglycemic can be a prelude to developing type 2 diabetes. Stay away from sugary foods and foods that contain bad carbs. Eat about 6 small meals a day instead of 3 larger ones. Always carry a snack that contains good carbs with you.

  10. QUESTION:
    does anyone know if there could be a connection between coeliac disease and diabeties?
    i was diagnosed with coeliac disease as as child and stuck to a gluten free diet right up until my late teens where it was considered that i had 'grown' out of it. now at 36 i have developed diabetes which has come on extremely quickly. the gp is having great difficulty getting my blood sugar level down to an acceptable level.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease are both autoimmune diseases. This effectively means your immune system which should fight bacteria and viruses etc has decided to attack you. In your case it's attacked the beta cells in the pancreas that make insulin, hence the diabetes, and the small bowel resulting in malabsorption and coeliac disease. With regards to your high blood sugars, if your GP is struggling to control your blood sugars, you may benefit from seeing a specialist. Often young people benefit from a 4 daily injection regime as opposed to a twice daily regime.

  11. QUESTION:
    Why would the physician give the patient cortisol? What problems would arise from this treatment?
    A physician notes that individuals with a tumor on the pancreas secrete unusually high levels of insulin. Unfortunately, insulin in high concentrations causes blood sugar levels to fall below the normal acceptable range. In attempt to correct the problem, the physician decides to inject the patient with cortisol. Why would the physician give the patient cortisol? What problems would arise from this treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      To the guy above me: Glucagon may be the opposite of insulin but it will not lower the insulin levels. It will only regulate the metabolism. The patient would be better off taking an insulin blocker to avoid a liver problem. Cortisol counter acts insulin by stimulating gluconeogenesis and inhibiting the use of glucose by decreasing the amount of transport proteins. Gluconeogenesis is the metabolism process that makes glucose. By having more glucose and the transporter protein for glucose being shut down, the body thinks it is in a "well fed" state (or has enough energy). The state then tells the liver "woa woa woa we're stuffed, no need for more energy" so they turn the glucose into glycogen which then lowers the insulin and raises the glucagon.
      This was a good move on the doctors pair because Cortisol is a hormone which means it moves really fast, so the effect of the treatment was fast. As for prolonged exposure to the cortisol here is a list i found:

      "Impaired cognitive performance
      Suppressed thyroid function
      Blood sugar imbalances such as hyperglycemia
      Decreased bone density
      Decrease in muscle tissue
      Higher blood pressure
      Lowered immunity and inflammatory responses in the body, slowed wound healing, and other health consequences
      Increased abdominal fat, which is associated with a greater amount of health problems than fat deposited in other areas of the body. Some of the health problems associated with increased stomach fat are heart attacks, strokes, the development of metabolic syndrome, higher levels of “bad” cholesterol (LDL) and lower levels of “good” cholesterol (HDL), which can lead to other health problems!""

      Do remember that this is only a long exposer to cortisol. For the process that the Doctor did, or a quick fix to the insulin, there would be relatively low symptoms other than slightly increased blood pressure
      Hope that helped

  12. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know the answer to this? AUTOMATIC 10 POINTS!!!?
    Lisa tries to keep her blood sugar levels below 120. When Lisa tested her blood sugar after school yesterday it was 200. When her blood sugar is too high, she often tries to lower it with exercise. Usually 20 minutes of brisk walking will reduce her blood sugar by 40 points. How long will Lisa have to walk to bring her blood sugar down to an acceptable level? Make a bar graph to show lisa's blood sugar levels before she walks, after 20 minutes of walking and after 40 minutes of walking. What would her blood sugar level be if she walked for half an hour?

    • ANSWER:
      Well I can't make bar graphs, But the answer is 40 minutes. Look. 200-(20 minutes of walking) 40=160. Do that agaign again bleackh 160-40=120! its 40 because 20 minutes of walking = minus 40 sugar level. ERR you changed da question. Thats 40 mins of walking. half an hour = 30 blood sugar NOW GIVE ME TEN POINTS!

  13. QUESTION:
    Sugar level after drinking 3 large 60 ml pegs of whiskey?
    Hi, I am an occasional drinker and take around 2-3 pegs at one time. Recently, I had a get-together with friends and had around 3 pegs of whiskey. I thought of getting my sugar level checked because I was having some symptoms earlier also. I went for the Blood Sugar test after 36 hours of taking 3 pegs. the results were Blood Sugar (Fasting) - 124 and Blood Sugar (PP) - 184. Please let me know if this level is acceptable or it can be termed as Type 2 Diabetes.

    Please also let me know how can I confirm whether its diabetes or not????

    • ANSWER:

  14. QUESTION:
    Can someone please help me!!!?
    One positive attribute of dietary fat is that it's a good source of?
    A)water
    B)boron
    C)vitamin C
    D)energy

    Which one of the following choices is the best way to control Type II diabetes?
    A)Inject insulin
    B)Avoiding all simple sugars
    C)Adopting a healthy diet & excercising
    D)Avoiding salt

    which one of the following snacks provides all of the essential amino acids?
    A)Apple wedges & carrot sticks
    B)small bowl of chili beans & rice
    C)Corn on the cob
    D)Pasta salad with vinaigrette dressing

    which on of the following choices is the best way to build muscle bulk?
    A)use amino acid powders from a health food store
    B)eat more high-protein foods
    C)avoid vegetarian diets
    D)eat a healthy,balanced diet & follow a regular firness program

    High triglycerides increase the risk for which one of the following conditions?
    A)type II diabetes
    B)heart disease
    C)thyroid disease
    D)osteoporosis

    saturated fats found in animal products,such as bacon & cheese,are also called?
    A)cholesterol
    B)triglycerides
    C)lipids
    D)amino acids

    an elevated HDL is considered a?
    A)risk factor for osteoporosis
    B)risk factor for artritis
    C)less harmful form of cholesterol found in the boady
    D)more harmful form of cholesterol found in the body

    How can a person with lactose intolerance obtain dietary calcium?
    A)take a pill that helps to digest lactose
    B)eat green leafy vegetables,nuts,and enriched soy products
    C)eat lots of fresh shellfish
    D)eat lots of whole grains

    which of the following choices is most accurate about fat-soluble vitamin?
    A)they can cause gastric upset,diarrhea,and kidney stones
    B)they provide no risk of vitamin toxicity
    C)they can be stored in the body
    D)they help build collage & aid in healing

    The glycemic index predicts the way certain foods affect
    A)blood sugar levels
    B)weight loss
    C)excercise performance
    D)blood pressure

    what are the heath benefits of zinc?
    A)reduced muscle fatigue
    B)proper wound healing
    C)control of blood pressure
    D)lung efficiency

    which one of the following factors contributes to hypertension?
    A) A vegotous exercise regimen
    B) A lack of sleep
    C) A diet that lacks protein
    D) A high-fat diet

    which one of the following choices is the best option for vegan snack?
    A)Vanailla soymilk,peanut butter,& pretzels
    B)Almond milk with butter cookies
    C)Chocolate soymilk with angel food cake
    D)Tomato jucie & macaroni & cheese

    how should daily calorie intake be divided for an adult in good health?
    A)80% carbohydrates,20% proteins
    B)60% carbohydrates,40% proteins
    C)60% carbohydrates,30% fats,10% proteins
    D)80% proteins,10%carbohydrates,10% fats

    A person who is lactose intolerants would have difficulty digesting which one of the following foods?
    A)grilled veggie burg on a sesame bun
    B)low-fat cheesecake with rasberries
    C)turkey hot dog with mustard
    D)three-bean salad

    which one of the following choices is the most nutrient-dense snack?
    A)sliced bananas,walnuts,& orange sections
    B)baked potato chips & sparkling water
    C)green salad with ranch dressing
    D)unsalted pretzels & cheddar cheese

    To derive energy from food,you must eat foods that contain?
    A)vitamins & minerals
    B)carbohydrates,proteins,and fats
    C)water
    D)fiber

    which one of the following choices would be an acceptable small meal for a person who is gluten intolerant?
    A)microwave popcorn & carrot sticks
    B)peanut butter on whole-wheat toast
    C)bread sticks with low-fat dressing
    D)orange jucie & graham crackers

    • ANSWER:
      A lot of question to answer.

      Could do it, but that would deny you the chance to do some research.

      Also, would take me too long. Please do some research, and answer the questions yourself. You will be able to do it, and feel better in yourself for doing so, rather than copying answers, that could be wrong anyway.

  15. QUESTION:
    Can someone please help me with my homework....?
    One positive attribute of dietary fat is that it's a good source of?
    A)water
    B)boron
    C)vitamin C
    D)energy

    Which one of the following choices is the best way to control Type II diabetes?
    A)Inject insulin
    B)Avoiding all simple sugars
    C)Adopting a healthy diet & excercising
    D)Avoiding salt

    which one of the following snacks provides all of the essential amino acids?
    A)Apple wedges & carrot sticks
    B)small bowl of chili beans & rice
    C)Corn on the cob
    D)Pasta salad with vinaigrette dressing

    which on of the following choices is the best way to build muscle bulk?
    A)use amino acid powders from a health food store
    B)eat more high-protein foods
    C)avoid vegetarian diets
    D)eat a healthy,balanced diet & follow a regular firness program

    High triglycerides increase the risk for which one of the following conditions?
    A)type II diabetes
    B)heart disease
    C)thyroid disease
    D)osteoporosis

    saturated fats found in animal products,such as bacon & cheese,are also called?
    A)cholesterol
    B)triglycerides
    C)lipids
    D)amino acids

    an elevated HDL is considered a?
    A)risk factor for osteoporosis
    B)risk factor for artritis
    C)less harmful form of cholesterol found in the boady
    D)more harmful form of cholesterol found in the body

    How can a person with lactose intolerance obtain dietary calcium?
    A)take a pill that helps to digest lactose
    B)eat green leafy vegetables,nuts,and enriched soy products
    C)eat lots of fresh shellfish
    D)eat lots of whole grains

    which of the following choices is most accurate about fat-soluble vitamin?
    A)they can cause gastric upset,diarrhea,and kidney stones
    B)they provide no risk of vitamin toxicity
    C)they can be stored in the body
    D)they help build collage & aid in healing

    The glycemic index predicts the way certain foods affect
    A)blood sugar levels
    B)weight loss
    C)excercise performance
    D)blood pressure

    what are the heath benefits of zinc?
    A)reduced muscle fatigue
    B)proper wound healing
    C)control of blood pressure
    D)lung efficiency

    which one of the following factors contributes to hypertension?
    A) A vegotous exercise regimen
    B) A lack of sleep
    C) A diet that lacks protein
    D) A high-fat diet

    which one of the following choices is the best option for vegan snack?
    A)Vanailla soymilk,peanut butter,& pretzels
    B)Almond milk with butter cookies
    C)Chocolate soymilk with angel food cake
    D)Tomato jucie & macaroni & cheese

    how should daily calorie intake be divided for an adult in good health?
    A)80% carbohydrates,20% proteins
    B)60% carbohydrates,40% proteins
    C)60% carbohydrates,30% fats,10% proteins
    D)80% proteins,10%carbohydrates,10% fats

    A person who is lactose intolerants would have difficulty digesting which one of the following foods?
    A)grilled veggie burg on a sesame bun
    B)low-fat cheesecake with rasberries
    C)turkey hot dog with mustard
    D)three-bean salad

    which one of the following choices is the most nutrient-dense snack?
    A)sliced bananas,walnuts,& orange sections
    B)baked potato chips & sparkling water
    C)green salad with ranch dressing
    D)unsalted pretzels & cheddar cheese

    To derive energy from food,you must eat foods that contain?
    A)vitamins & minerals
    B)carbohydrates,proteins,and fats
    C)water
    D)fiber

    which one of the following choices would be an acceptable small meal for a person who is gluten intolerant?
    A)microwave popcorn & carrot sticks
    B)peanut butter on whole-wheat toast
    C)bread sticks with low-fat dressing
    D)orange jucie & graham crackers

    • ANSWER:
      haha help, more like do it for you!

  16. QUESTION:
    Fitness And Nutrition?
    1. One positive attribute of dietary fat is that it’s a good
    source of
    A. water. C. vitamin C.
    B. boron. D. energy.
    2. Which one of the following choices is the best way to control
    Type II diabetes?
    A. Injecting insulin
    B. Avoiding all simple sugars
    C. Adopting a healthy diet and exercising
    D. Avoiding salt
    3. Which one of the following snacks provides all of the essential amino acids?
    A. Apple wedges and carrot sticks
    B. Small bowl of chili beans and rice
    C. Corn on the cob
    D. Pasta salad with vinaigrette dressing
    4. Which one of the following choices is the best way to build muscle bulk?
    A. Use amino acid powders from a health food store.
    B. Eat more high-protein foods.
    C. Avoid vegetarian diets.
    D. Eat a healthy, balanced diet and follow a regular fitness program.
    5. High triglycerides increase the risk for which one of the following conditions?
    A. Type II diabetes C. Thyroid disease
    B. Heart disease D. Osteoporosis
    6. Saturated fats found in animal products, such as bacon and cheese, are also called
    A. cholesterol. C. lipids.
    B. triglycerides. D. amino acids.
    7. An elevated HDL is considered a
    A. risk factor for osteoporosis.
    B. risk factor for arthritis.
    C. less harmful form of cholesterol found in the body.
    D. more harmful form of cholesterol found in the body.
    8. How can a person with lactose intolerance obtain dietary calcium?
    A. Take a pill that helps to digest lactose.
    B. Eat green leafy vegetables, nuts, and enriched soy products.
    C. Eat lots of fresh shellfish.
    D. Eat lots of whole grains.
    9. Which one of the following choices is most accurate about fat-soluble vitamins?
    A. They can cause gastric upset, diarrhea, and kidney stones.
    B. They provide no risk of vitamin toxicity.
    C. They can be stored in the body.
    D. They help build collagen and aid in healing.
    10. The glycemic index predicts the way certain foods affect
    A. blood sugar levels. C. exercise performance.
    B. weight loss.
    11. What are the health benefits of zinc?
    A. Reduced muscle fatigue C. Control of blood pressure
    B. Proper wound healing D. Lung efficiency
    12. Which one of the following factors contributes to hypertension?
    A. A vigorous exercise regimen C. A diet that lacks protein
    B. A lack of sleep D. A high-fat diet
    13. Which one of the following choices is the best option for a vegan snack?
    A. Vanilla soymilk, peanut butter, and pretzels
    B. Almond milk with butter cookies
    C. Chocolate soymilk with angel food cake
    D. Tomato juice and macaroni and cheese
    14. How should daily calorie intake be divided for an adult in good health?
    A. 80 percent carbohydrates, 20 percent proteins
    B. 60 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent proteins
    C. 60 percent carbohydrates, 30 percent fats, 10 percent proteins
    D. 80 percent proteins, 10 percent carbohydrates, 10 percent fats
    15. A person who is lactose intolerant would have difficulty digesting which one of the
    following foods?
    A. Grilled veggie burger on a sesame bun C. Turkey hot dog with mustard
    B. Low-fat cheesecake with raspberries D. Three-bean salad
    16. Which one of the following choices is the most nutrient-dense snack?
    A. Sliced bananas, walnuts, and orange sections
    B. Baked potato chips and sparkling water
    C. Green salad with ranch dressing
    D. Unsalted pretzels and cheddar cheese
    17. To derive energy from food, you must eat foods that contain
    A. vitamins and minerals. C. water.
    B. carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. D. fiber.
    18. Which one of the following choices is a simple sugar?
    A. Glucose C. Lactase
    B. Orange juice D. Chocolate
    19. Which one of the following snack combinations will best satisfy a person’s daily
    fluid requirements?
    A. Ice cream, sherbet, and fruit
    B. Bananas, whole-wheat bread, and water
    C. Fresh fruit, green salad, water
    D. Fruit juice, energy bars, cold cereal
    20 Which one of the following choices would be an acceptable small meal for a person
    who is gluten intolerant?
    A. Microwave popcorn and carrot sticks
    B. Peanut butter on whole-wheat toast
    C. Bread sticks with low-fat dressing
    D. Orange juice and graham crackers

    • ANSWER:
      1 d
      2.c
      3.b
      4.d
      5.b
      6.b
      7.d
      8.b
      9.c
      10.a
      11.b
      12.b
      13.d
      14.c
      15.b
      16.a
      17.a
      18.b
      19.c
      20.b

      alright... i hope i did well!

  17. QUESTION:
    Non-fasting Glucose Level?
    I am 28 weeks pregnant and my midwife uses a glucose meter instead of the glucola drink most OB's use to test my blood sugar. What are normal levels before eating, then 1 hour after eating?

    I have tested twice, once before and after breakfast:80 before 91 after and once before and after lunch 90 before 101 after.

    Are these numbers within the acceptable range?

    • ANSWER:
      Your fine the averagehealthy number is 86 but anywhere from 80-120 is perfectly normal

  18. QUESTION:
    Diabetics have you ever had this problem?
    Hubby is a diabetic. lately he has been having more trouble keeping his sugar at an acceptable level.We knew this was coming as the doctor told us that over time it gets harder.But what really concerns me is he is so wiped out lately. today at 5 pm he took his sugar for the first time today( note our household runs on a third shift schedule so this would actually be early to mid day for him) and it was 235 and he hadn't eaten or drank anything at all. He is due back to the doctor on the 25th of this month but I'm thinking he needs to go back earlier.My sister in law tonight said she was wondering it it was his adrenal system(? okay I admit I'm clueless on this). He's tired all the time, no energy,has to force himself to eat, and I might add he also has had a back surgery.He became diabetic after the surgery.What scares me the most is he says he feels like he is dying! wtf! I guess my question is if you are diabetic when did keeping your sugar under control become harder and does any of what is going on with the hubby sound familiar to you. his blood pressure ,triglycerides, and weight are all good also the last time we were at the doctor his A1C score was a 6.5. Any idea what is going on?

    • ANSWER:
      Sometimes diabetes doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. Take those mornings that your husband wakes up with blood glucose that’s higher than it was when he went to sleep. You’d think that not eating for those seven or eight hours would give him a lower blood glucose.

      The dawn phenomenon is a natural rise in blood glucose between the hours of 4:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., and it occurs because of hormonal changes in the body.

      Treatment for dawn phenomenon depends on how he treat his diabetes. If he take insulin, he may be able to adjust his dosing so that peak action occurs closer to the morning rise in his blood glucose. If he has type 2, diabetes pills provide options as well adding Metformin as it aids the liver.

      The Somogyi effect, named for researcher Michael Somogyi, PhD, who studied and first described it, is his body’s response to a low that he had while he was sleeping. The body responds to those hormones by raising blood glucose—sometimes too much.

      He would treat this the opposite way of how he would treat dawn phenomenon. He could have a snack before he goes to sleep or reduce his insulin infusion at night. If he takes NPH, he can switch to an insulin that won’t dip him down at 3:00 a.m. It’s a good idea to check his blood glucose if he wakes up sweating or with headaches, as those are signs of a low.

      Sometimes his insulin just runs out or wears off. Then it’s a matter of him and his doctor adjusting his insulin regimen accordingly. If it’s insulin waning, he could look at splitting your basal insulin or taking it at a different time of the day. If he takes NPH at supper, he could move it closer to bedtime.

      Before he and his doctor can adjust his diet or medications to handle high morning blood glucose he has to know what's the culprit. There's one simple way: Check his blood glucose at 3:00 a.m. for several nights in a row. You need to see where his blood glucose is at bedtime, at 3:00 a.m., and in the morning. If his blood glucose is fairly even between bedtime and 3:00 a.m., but then rises between 3:00 a.m. and morning, chances are he's experiencing dawn phenomenon.
      If his blood glucose is low at 3:00 a.m., he's most likely experiencing the Somogyi effect.
      If his blood glucose is higher at 3:00 a.m. than at bedtime and higher still in the morning, his insulin is probably waning or not working properly.

      His having diabetes, chances are he'll experience the occasional high morning blood glucose. That’s not something to fret about too much. But if it happens regularly, then it’s time to call your doctor. He should also suspect a problem when his morning blood glucose is the highest of the day, and when it is consistently high for the rest of the day after that. If it’s significant, it should be dealt with because those who have high blood glucose in the morning tend to have high blood glucose all day, so its important to seek his doctor's care and have him/her get your husband's blood sugars stabilized in order to prevent diabetic complications-- try to do this as soon as you can.

      Hope this helps.

  19. QUESTION:
    Diabetes type II - could this be?
    Good Morning

    I have just made a GP appointment to discuss some worrying symptoms which I have developed over the last 3 days. I just wanted to get some feedback from the community before I go to the doctors to help prepare me for what I might hear. Hope you can help.

    I am a 34 year old male of acceptable weight / BMI for height. I am fit and healthy at the moment although I have had a recent history of Pulmonary Embolism and DVT, the cause of which has never been diagnosed - my blood is fine and levels are within ranges. I've had no presentments of DVT symptoms in over 12 months.

    Now, over the last week I have been have blurred vision, specifically peripheral vision which I managed to fix by eating something on each occassion.

    2 days ago I notice some red marks appearing on my left shin. They are clustered in the centre of my shin, they are not really sore or itchy and they resemble what I would describe as a burn type wound. They are deep red in colour with a smooth surface, no scab. This morning I noticed some smaller red raised dots appearing on my right shin, about 3 or 4 again in the centre of my leg. There are no other marks or blemishes elsewhere on my body.

    I have lost a little weight over the last month but I attributed this to a nasty flu which I had for most of december. I also blamed the flu for my loss of appetite and disinterest in food in general. I have a general aversion to sweet foods but can occassional cravings for chocolate and sugary drinks, I even have developed a taste for sugar in my tea.

    I am not urinating any more than usual and I do not have an excessive thirst.

    Could these be early signs of type II?

    Thanks for your help

    • ANSWER:
      Your response does not sound like type 2 diabetes but it's really easy to confirm with a blood test from your doctor's office. Some types of diabetes, especially type 1, don't always show common traits between all individuals.

      I really think he/she is going to be looking for some other reason though first.

      If you just want some good background information that you can see before your appointment check at this site below. It can answer a lot of the questions you have so you will be better prepared for your appointment.


Acceptable Blood Sugar Levels When Fasting

The federal government conducts a landmark study from 1983 to 1993 that profoundly changed the organization of diabetes. The study involved 1,441 volunteers with Type 1 diabetes at 29 medical centers in the United States and Canada. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study in 1998 shaped similar results for people with Type 2 diabetes.

Do you have high blood sugar levels or are you diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Millions of americans each year are afflicted with this unfaithful disease. Thus it becomes important that controlling your blood sugar levels can help you lead a fit and normal life.

Read more on Home Remedies for High Blood Pressure and Low Blood Pressure Home Remedies and Home Remedies


Acceptable Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Fasting Blood Glucose Level Test, Fasting Blood Sugar Test (FBS) - both are synonymous terms referring to one and the same compound - glucose test - in many words and in the same style. Fasting in English refers, to the a situation where one abstains or refrains from food of any kind overnight or any other period except water; and for purposes of confirming, fasting should take a minimum of 8 hours overnight for this test to have any meaning. Early in the morning the next day by 7 o'clock, the patient should be heading to the laboratory for blood glucose test. It is a reliable simple test preferred by many health workers. It is not affected by age or activities surrounding the patient and may be repeated after a while to further verify results.

Since glucose behaves like elastic; increasing and decreasing depending on circumstances one is subjected to, patient fasting speaks volumes in spelling out how much glucose is above or below normal after 8 hours. The test is taken before any morning meals are taken lest it spoils the average expected figure for the good 8 hour sleep.

Why fast? Fasting as a matter of principle triggers the pancreas to release hormones that talk to the liver to start digesting its stored product glycogen into glucose for use in energy production during the night. The sequence of events is dynamic; the same pancreas will respond on short notice, by releasing insulin to manage any excesses of glucose and level it up. The gear inserted under normal circumstances, is the leveling up and resultant stability, whereas in diabetic cases the scenario is unfortunate. Glucose will rise above normal and upon testing will obviously exhibit a positive diagnosis to the disease for the simple reason; insulin is missing or not enough to fight the struggle. Time and again we are reminded of sugar excesses termed in medical terms hyperglycemia and deficiency hypoglycemia that medication is only a temporary measure while in real terms behavior change is the answer.

The few drops of blood taken for testing will assist in determining how the body is breaking down food and converting into simpler units for use by the many muscles in various organs of the body. It is also going to give an indication of the liver - the most complex organ of the body- on how it is working; plus the main regulator now - the pancreas - that raises the red flag at all times policing the blood glucose level violation. Notwithstanding the fact that many other tests have been pointed out to assist in determining health status on matters of sugar control, fasting blood sugar test (FBS) remains a very reliable test that I give 10 points in a scale of 1 to 10.

In summary when this test is done, blood glucose level higher than 125mg/dl is confirmed as diabetic; 100mg/dl is mild diabetic while a level of 70mg/dl is normal. In a case of less than 70mg/dl the situation is hypoglycemia.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What's Acceptable Blood Sugar Levels in a Child?
    My 10 year old son's blood sugar level last week about 90mins after eating was 15.3 (275mmol). I thought this was a bit high so we've checked it a few times since.

    His fasting level before breakfast the other morning was 8.0 (144mmol) he hadn't eaten in around 13 hrs. Tonight 90mins after eating dinner he is showing 12.8 (230mmol)

    He doesn't seem to have excessive thirst and seems to pee normally but he can be tired and does complain of headaches and sore tummy's regularly.

    I've tried googling to get an idea if these readings are high (they're all higher than mine..I'm not diabetic but I'm 7mths pregnant and have been asked to check my levels for 10 days as I am fasting glucose intolerant) but can't find a definite answer. Most places seem to suggest this is too high for a child who is not diabetic.

    Any advice greatly received!

    • ANSWER:
      The diagnosis of diabetes is surprisingly straightforward. It doesn’t require many tests to rule out other possibilities. The following signs establish the diagnosis of diabetes:

      a urine test showing a lot of sugar and the presence of ketones
      symptoms such as extreme thirst and frequent urinating
      The following test confirms the diagnosis: a reliable laboratory blood sugar reading of more than 11.1 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) taken at any time of day. It doesn’t matter when the child last ate.

      It is not usually difficult to tell whether a child has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. By far most children and teens have type 1. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually start dramatically because the pancreas stops making insulin. Ketones are much more likely to be present in the urine in type 1 diabetes than in type 2. However, if there are no ketones it doesn’t mean that it isn’t type 1. Rather, it suggests that the child was diagnosed early, before ketones had the chance to form. Unfortunately, early diagnosis doesn’t mean that the child has a less severe case of diabetes, or that treatment will be easier.

      In rare cases, it can be difficult to determine whether the diagnosis is type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Other testing might include fasting insulin levels, genetic testing, or looking for immune markers of type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, there are certain antibodies in the body. They are created in response to the proteins on the pancreas cells that release insulin. If these markers are present, it suggests that the diabetes is more likely to be type 1. If no markers are present, it is more likely type 2 diabetes, but this is not a definite diagnosis.

      The recommended test for type 2 diabetes is called a fasting blood glucose test. This test checks blood glucose levels after your child hasn’t had anything to eat for at least eight hours. The doctor may also use a test called an oral glucose tolerance test.

      It would seem that your child is diabetic. Go to the website below and check it out.
      So many website have such Acceptable High Glucose levels, which are wrong. Any glucose level over 140 causes damage , whether adult or child.
      Good luck.

      Tin

  2. QUESTION:
    What is an acceptable blood sugar level for a man over 70? Thanks?
    My blood sugar level (fasting) is around 140. I am over 70. Some of my friends say it is OK at my age; others say it should be below 115. I don't take any medication for diabetes. Should I see a doctor or continue my life-style. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Blood sugar levels range from 60-120 these being acceptable levels. Anything below 60 can cause hypoglycemia which is not acceptable due to the that one can go into a coma and suffer from seizure episodes. Then we look at the other side of the coin if the blood sugar goes way past ove 200 to 500 then a person can go into a coma and die.. So the best point of this situation is to follow your diet, exercise, take your blood sugars at least twice a day.. If they are not in good range then you shoud follow-up with your family physician for further evaluation. Best of luck to you.

  3. QUESTION:
    is blood sugar 137 ok for fasting 10 hours?
    i have been on prednisone for since 2003. the last time my blood sugar was 137 after fasting for 10 hours. is this an acceptable level?

    • ANSWER:
      No. As you know, prednisone increases blood sugars, and in your case it has done so to the point of almost certainly inducing full-blown diabetes. See your doctor or endocrinologist ASAP to discuss glucose management, either by treating the diabetes or reducing the prednisone if that is feasible.

      Edit: the diagnostic criteria (for repeated, uncontaminated tests) is above 126mg/dl fasting or above 200mg/dl random. 137 is above the diagnostic line and indicates diabetes if the test is uncontaminated and repeatable.

  4. QUESTION:
    Will a type 1 diabetic definately show on a fasting blood glucose test?
    Is it possible for an undiagnosed type 1 diabetic to have an acceptable sugar level in a blood test after fasting?
    And the same for an undiagnosed type 2 diabetic?

    please only answer if you know for sure as this is for a research project.

    • ANSWER:
      NO it is not possible to have a normal fasting blood sugar in type 1by its nature will always be raised
      type 1 classically polyuria,polydipsia and weight loss.
      Often will present with coma and ketosis

      A normal fasting blood sugar result is lower than 100 milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dL).

      fasting blood sugar level is 100 mg/dL to 125 mg/dL, you have impaired fasting glucose — prediabetic

      A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL or higher is consistent type 1 or type 2 diabetes

      If your blood sugar level is higher than 200 mg/dL and you have signs or symptoms of diabetes, diagnosis confirmed

      Type 2 will often be found incidentally-classically overweight middle age
      infections, bacterial or fungal common presentation-e.g. boils or vaginitis

  5. QUESTION:
    Sugar level after drinking 3 large 60 ml pegs of whiskey?
    Hi, I am an occasional drinker and take around 2-3 pegs at one time. Recently, I had a get-together with friends and had around 3 pegs of whiskey. I thought of getting my sugar level checked because I was having some symptoms earlier also. I went for the Blood Sugar test after 36 hours of taking 3 pegs. the results were Blood Sugar (Fasting) - 124 and Blood Sugar (PP) - 184. Please let me know if this level is acceptable or it can be termed as Type 2 Diabetes.

    Please also let me know how can I confirm whether its diabetes or not????

    • ANSWER:

  6. QUESTION:
    Non-fasting Glucose Level?
    I am 28 weeks pregnant and my midwife uses a glucose meter instead of the glucola drink most OB's use to test my blood sugar. What are normal levels before eating, then 1 hour after eating?

    I have tested twice, once before and after breakfast:80 before 91 after and once before and after lunch 90 before 101 after.

    Are these numbers within the acceptable range?

    • ANSWER:
      Your fine the averagehealthy number is 86 but anywhere from 80-120 is perfectly normal


Acceptable Blood Sugar Levels For Type 2 Diabetics

Type 2 diabetes is a commonly found chronic disease caused due to improper production or utilization of insulin. Chances for getting type 2 diabetes vary from person to person. Heredity, hypertension and old age are main risk factors of type 2 diabetes. It may cause several negative impacts on life like increased appetite, increased thirst, blurred vision, fatigue and erectile dysfunction. After evaluating symptoms, you can easily verify this disorder by conducting blood tests. Fasting blood glucose level, oral glucose tolerance level and hemoglobin A1c test are some of the best recommended blood tests for verifying type 2 diabetes. Even though diabetes is not fully curable, we can maintain the normal level of blood sugar level in body by following a healthy lifestyle with proper medications. Now let's see in detail some of the best diabetes treatment for type 2.

Intake of oral medicines is a commonly prescribed diabetes treatment for type 2 helping in maintaining a balanced blood sugar level. At present, there are many oral medicines available at medical stores. Before using oral medicines, it is advised to seek guidance from a physician for knowing your correct dosage level. Sulphonylureas is one among the best used oral diabetic medicines promoting insulin production in pancreas. Release of insulin from beta cells lowers the amount of blood sugar level and reduces the risk of hyperglycemic condition.

You can also intake sulphonylureas with metmorphin for treating type 2 diabetes. Intake of metmorphin reduce the amount of sugar absorbed by intestinal walls, make body cells more sensitive to insulin action and limits the release the glucose from liver to blood stream. It is a perfect solution for those who are suffering from type 2 diabetes due to over weight problems. Acarbose, exenatide, glitazones and gliptins are other common oral medicines suggested' for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Following a healthy diabetic diet is a best recommended type 2 diabetes treatment. Diabetic diet is a blend of nutritive, low caloric value and low cholesterol level food items. Green leafy vegetables, fresh fruits, nuts, brown rice, millet, pealed barley and quinoa are main food items included in diabetic diet. While following a diabetic diet, it is advised to intake frequent light meals instead of heavy meals. Potatoes, ghee products, spices and oily fried food items should be avoided. It is also advised to cease the intake of alcohol and processed food items for maintaining a balanced blood sugar level.

Proper exercise is another suggested diabetes treatment for lowering blood sugar level. Doing regular exercises helps in proper functioning of metabolic activities and lowers heightening of blood sugar level. Performing aerobic exercises like walking, jogging, bicycling and swimming helps in promoting over all well being of the person. It reduces over weight, prevents heart diseases, reduces hypertension problems and improves muscle sensitivity towards insulin. Practicing of yoga exercises is another effective type 2 diabetes treatment used for stimulating the functioning of pancreas. Bhramari, surya namaskara, salabha asana and pavanamukta asana are some among the best recommended yogic exercises for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.