Correct Blood Sugar Levels Type 2 Diabetes

Hypoglycemia or blood sugar is a disorder of blood sugar metabolism which may result in
diabetes in later life. It is a condition in which the pancreas produces too much insulin, causing
the blood sugar to drop.
Hypoglycemia sometimes occurs in healthy people some hours after a meal rich in
carbohydrates, especially following muscular exertion. It is frequently found in the first few days
of life, especially among premature infants.
Hypoglycemia is a serious disorder as the brain cannot function properly when the blood sugar
level is too low. Like all other organs of the body, the brain receive its fuel from the diet. But it
can use only the sugar produced by the body from carbohydrates. Unlike many of the body
tissues, it cannot store its fuel. Therefore, it must get a constant supply of sugar through the
bloodstream. Mental disturbances caused by subnormal blood sugar levels can seriously affect
a persons life.
Symptoms
A craving for sweets and starches in excessive amount between meals is the first sign of low
blood sugar level . When the blood sugar level falls much below normal, symptoms such as
nervousness, irritability, fatigue, depression, disturbed vision and headache appear. Other
symptoms are sweating, trembling, numbness, absent-mindedness, dizziness, palpitation of the
heart and some sexual disturbances. Most hypoglycemia patients feel hungry and eat frequently
to get over the feeling of weakness and emotional irritability. They feel tense if they have to go
without food for several hours.
Causes
Hypoglycemia is usually caused by an excessive intake of refined carbohydrates and sugar
foods. These substances cause the pancreas, the adrenal gland and the liver to lose their ability

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Why would a type 2 diabetes blood sugar level be high in the morning but way lower throughout the day?
    My grandpa will wake up in the morning and find his blood sugar level (which I believe is what he measures with type 2 diabetes, correct me if im wrong) to be high, like 150-160, but he will go to his job which he does in the morning and comes home around 1pm most days, and when he measures it it is down to 110-130 already.
    He has been continuing a very good diet full of fiber and fruit and vegetables, and doesn’t eat late night snacks anymore(which makes this more confusing) but from day 1 he has had this problem.
    He asked his doctor and he seemed clueless. Anyone know anything about this?!?!?
    sorry if i mixed up the details :/ i dont know what kind of doctor hes seeing or anything

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, he would be checking his blood sugar every morning and hopefully before each meal. He should also check at 1 hour and 2 hours after supper at least once a week. This will tell him how well his body is handling what he eats and if he needs to make any changes to his diet or meds.

      This higher morning blood sugar is called Dawn Phenomenon. The solution for most diabetics is to have a small snack of about 15 carbs from whole grain, with some fat or protien. This reduces the amount of sugar that the liver releases overnight, resulting in a better reading in the morning.

      A good bedtime snack is one slice of WHOLE GRAIN bread with peanut butter (the type with NO sugar added). Or if he doesn’t like peanut butter, he could add a slice of cold chicken or roast beef, or some low fat cream cheese.

      His blood sugar in the morning should be between 110 and 135, so its a bit high right now. Having a small bedtime snack should help bring it down. I know it seems unlikely, but it works.

      IF he has any history of heart disease or is at risk, this fasting level will give him a better chance of surviving a heart attack, at least that’s what my endocrinologist told me just this week. Having really tight blood sugar control is a bit risky when you are older or having heart related issues.

      Tight blood sugar means having a fasting level from 90 to 120. He shouldn’t be aiming this low. Right now he’s not doing that badly and the snack at bedtime should help.

      If he was a much younger man, his morning blood sugar goal should be between 5.0 and 120, but given his age, that’s just too low. Recent studies show that having a more moderate approach to blood sugar reduces the risks for older people and increased the survival rate (in both studies).

      As a diabetic, he needs to be very careful what fruits he eats and how much. Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and blueberries are good choices as they are high in fiber and low in carbs compared to other fruits.

      He should stay away from things like dried fruits such as raisins, figs and dates. Bananas are also quite high in sugar and not a good choice. He should also avoid canned fruits that have syrup. Look for fruits canned in water or juice, and drain off the juice, as its full of sugars, whether natural or added. Fresh fruit or fruit frozen with NO added sugar is far better than canned.

      You can look up the carb content of fruits, veggies and other foods online at

      http://www.calorieking.com/

      http://www.thedailyplate.com/

      http://www.thedailyplate.com/

      and of course, if he’s using frozen or canned fruit, the carbs are listed on the packaging. Make sure he’s using the serving size suggested and not more.

      Your grandpa might have better results if he tests his blood sugar more often, and keeps a food log for a little while. If you want a testing guide you can print off, you can download a PDF here..

      http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/flyer.pdf

  2. QUESTION:
    does eating too much sweets cause diabetes?
    Most people say that eating too much sweets doesn’t cause diabetes. But it can cause obesity which in turn can cause type 2 diabetes.

    I say, eating too much sweets and carbohydrates can cause diabetes. Sweets are full of sucrose. The carbohydrates are immediately broken down into glucose when eaten and quickly enter the bloodstream. That means eating too many carbohydrates and sweets at once cause pancreas to release larger than normal amounts of insulin to regulate high blood sugar levels. When these types of foods are consumed on a regular basis, pancreas would become over-worked and would ultimately fail to function properly. This would lead to diabetes. Am I correct?

    • ANSWER:
      I thik the prevailing opinion among most of the researchers is that the type I diabetes is an autoimmune response towards pancreatic beta cells. The reason for this is unknown, but could be e.g. certain viral infections that today happen too late in a child’s life, rendering them susceptible to autoimmunity – however, the underlying mechanisms are complex, since a small portion of people develope type I diabetes, despite most of (the Western) people live in fairly similar environments. Genetics surely plays a part. However, as far as I know, sweets – or the sugar in them does not. 

      What comes to type II diabetes, again, it’s not the sugar (/sweets) itself that causes the disease – rather, it’s a combination of life style aspects, where sugar is one cause due to its tendency to make people obese – and obesity in turn is a major risk factor for type II 

      People can develop both types of diabetes without excessive use of sugar.

  3. QUESTION:
    If I was incorrectly diagnosed can I have it removed from my medical records?
    My doctor diagnosed me with type 2 diabetes and when I did more research on it I found out that my blood sugar levels were never actually above the level considered “diabetic”. Now I need to change insurance companies due to a job change and want that diagnosis taken off my medical records since it wasn’t correct in the first place and will likely make my premium higher for my new insurance. Is this possible? Has anyone done this?
    My A1-C level was NEVER above a 7, which is the lowest it can be and still be considered “diabetic”. That was the information I found on the internet. I had the lab results from my test to compare it to…I was not just diagnosing myself. I only wondered if, since the doctor filled out the sheet from my office visit stating the diagnosis from that day (type 2 diabetes), whether he would have to state in writing somewhere that it was a misdiagnosis or would the test records in my file be enough to fight it if the insurance company tries to say I am diabetic when I apply for new insurance.
    I tested my daily fasting blood glucose for 3 months and it was typically around 100. And never over 120. I took the class in diabetes offered at my local health department and that’s why I became aware of the actual glucose levels that determined whether you are or are not a diabetic and according to the numbers I am not. I am close, but not there yet. I just think it would be unfair to have to pay a higher premium for health insurance because my doctor labled me a diabetic when I am not, not officially.

    • ANSWER:
      You can have your doctor add a correction to your medical record. What you need to do is submit your request in writing telling of your findings and ask him to add a correction, changing your diagnosis. However, your A1C being under 7 doesn’t mean that you aren’t a diabetic, it can mean that your diabetes is still controlled without medications. Check your fasting glucose levels as well. That with your A1C will give you a better picture of your diabetic state.

  4. QUESTION:
    Double Checking Answers On Nutrition Basics. HELP PLEASE! (:?
    I put brackets around my answers. example: [A]

    PLEASE! let me know if they are correct or not. thank you.

    1. One positive attribute of dietary fat is that it’s a good
    source of
    A. water.
    B. boron.
    C. vitamin C
    [D]. energy.

    2. Which one of the following choices is the best way to control
    Type II diabetes?
    A. Injecting insulin
    B. Avoiding all simple sugars
    [C]. Adopting a healthy diet and exercising
    D. Avoiding salt

    3. Which one of the following snacks provides all of the essential amino acids?
    A. Apple wedges and carrot sticks
    [B]. Small bowl of chili beans and rice
    C. Corn on the cob
    D. Pasta salad with vinaigrette dressing

    4. Which one of the following choices is the best way to build muscle bulk?
    A. Use amino acid powders from a health food store.
    B. Eat more high-protein foods.
    C. Avoid vegetarian diets.
    [D]. Eat a healthy, balanced diet and follow a regular fitness program.

    5. High triglycerides increase the risk for which one of the following conditions?
    A. Type II diabetes
    [B]. Heart disease
    C. Thyroid disease
    D. Osteoporosis

    6. Saturated fats found in animal productsGDLuch as bacon and cheese, are also called
    A. cholesterol.
    [B]. triglycerides.
    C. lipids.
    D. amino acids.

    7. An elevated HDL is considered a
    A. risk factor for osteoporosis.
    B. risk factor for arthritis.
    [C]. less harmful form of cholesterol found in the body.
    D. more harmful form of cholesterol found in the body.

    8. How can a person with lactose intolerance obtain dietary calcium?
    [A]. Take a pill that helps to digest lactose.
    B. Eat green leafy vegetables, nuts, and enriched soy products.
    C. Eat lots of fresh shellfish.
    D. Eat lots of whole grains.

    9. Which one of the following choices is most accurate about fat-soluble vitamins?
    A. They can cause gastric upset, diarrhea, and kidney stones.
    B. They provide no risk of vitamin toxicity.
    [C]. They can be stored in the body.
    D. They help build collagen and aid in healing.

    10. The glycemic index predicts the way certain foods affect
    [A]. blood sugar levels.
    B. weight loss.
    C. exercise performance.
    D. blood pressure.

    11. What are the health benefits of zinc?
    A. Reduced muscle fatigue
    [B]. Proper wound healing
    C. Control of blood pressure
    D. Lung efficiency

    12. Which one of the following factors contributes to hypertension?
    A. A vigorous exercise regimen
    B. A lack of sleep
    C. A diet that lacks protein
    [D]. A high-fat diet

    13. Which one of the following choices is the best option for a vegan snack?
    A. Vanilla soymilk, peanut butter, and pretzels
    B. Almond milk with butter cookies
    [C]. Chocolate soymilk with angel food cake
    D. Tomato juice and macaroni and cheese

    14. How should daily calorie intake be divided for an adult in good health?
    A. 80 percent carbohydrates, 20 percent proteins
    B. 60 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent proteins
    [C]. 60 percent carbohydrates, 30 percent fats, 10 percent proteins
    D. 80 percent proteins, 10 percent carbohydrates, 10 percent fats

    15. A person who is lactose intolerant would have difficulty digesting which one of the
    following foods?
    A. Grilled veggie burger on a sesame bun
    [B]. Low-fat cheesecake with raspberries
    C. Turkey hot dog with mustard
    D. Three-bean salad

    16. Which one of the following choices is the most nutrient-dense snack?
    [A]. Sliced bananas, walnuts, and orange sections
    B. Baked potato chips and sparkling water
    C. Green salad with ranch dressing
    D. Unsalted pretzels and cheddar cheese

    17. To derive energy from food, you must eat foods that contain
    A. vitamins and minerals.
    [B]. carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.
    C. water.
    D. fiber.

    18. Which one of the following choices is a simple sugar?
    A. Glucose
    B. Orange juice
    C. Lactase
    [D]. Chocolate

    19. Which one of the following snack combinations will best satisfy a person’s daily
    fluid requirements?
    A. Ice cream, sherbet, and fruit
    B. Bananas, whole-wheat bread, and water
    [C]. Fresh fruit, green salad, water
    D. Fruit juice, energy bars, cold cereal

    20 Which one of the following choices would be an acceptable small meal for a person
    who is gluten intolerant?
    [A]. Microwave popcorn and carrot sticks
    B. Peanut butter on whole-wheat toast
    C. Bread sticks with low-fat dressing
    D. Orange juice and graham crackers

    • ANSWER:
      You better send each and every question separately..

  5. QUESTION:
    Do i need to change my doctor?
    I am 28 years old male, working in middle east. My work is of a type of sitting in the chair for the whole day. I’ve diagnosed with diabetes ( i am not sure about whether it is of type 1 or type 2) in 2002, but due to my financial circumstances i could not able to have the treatment or medicine. Then the situation got worse, but fortunately i got higher education and got a better job in middle east. In early 2007, i consulted a doctor who was shocked as my Random blood sugar level was about 640mg/dl and he prescribed me Novolets (two shots a day). It was Mixtard 300. By that time my height was 152 centimetres (5 feet) and weight was 37 kgs. Since then, i am taking insulin everyday and even though i remeber two or three times when my blood sugar level went above 700 mg/dl. During last three years i faced such very high levels and extremely low levels, the minimum being 36mg/dl. Even now my weight is only 38.5kg to 39 kg. I dont know what is happening really, whether i am taking the correct insulin or not? whether i have to change my doctor? Could anybody advise me please? Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:

  6. QUESTION:
    Can steriods cause a high A1C?
    In Sept 08, my doc ran a A1C at my request (my brother was diagnosed with diabetes, and it runs in my family) and it came back at 4. My doctor also started me on a high dose of predisone for COPD, (80mg x 2 times a day). In March 09, I was diagnosed with Type 2 with a blood sugar of 1400, and my A1C was 13. At that time, my doc started pulling me off the steriods. He put me on insulin 70/30, metformin 500 x 2 a day, and glyburide 5mg 1 x a day. As of April 1, I was totally off the steriod. On April 14, he pulled me off the insulin, on April 20th, I came off the glyburide, as my sugars kept dropping into the 30′s and 40′s. Now I am off everything due to sugar dropping on a daily basis, stopped the metformin on May 1. Since stopping all the meds, my blood sugar has been very stable. It stays between 88 and 107. Last night around 1am I ate a sandwich on a white hoagie, and ate a normal size piece of carrot cake with frosting. This morning 6:30am when I checked my blood, my reading was 105. I understand that the A1C was correct when they took it, but could it be possible that I am not diabetic and it was caused by the steriods?

    Don’t worry, I am still going to follow my diet, (last night was the exception because I did want to see what would happen with my levels), and I will be retested, but I have to wait for 3 months to get tested again, don’t I??

    • ANSWER:
      At the rate you are going, you seem to have normal blood sugar. Whether you are a diabetic or not, I am the one to tell you, but the way you explained your situation, the steroids could have whacked your system and thus you were diagnosed as a diabetic. Now, since diabetes runs in your family, it is important that you should have control of it and the best system is to follow the Medication, Exercise and Diet system, or the MED system. If you can maintain your blood sugar at normal levels with Diet and Exercise alone, then that would be ideal, but if you could not, then just adapt the MED system. Good luck to you and God bless. Please see your doctor and ask him more questions on your condition.

  7. QUESTION:
    10 points if you know the endocrine system?
    1.
    Steroid hormones work by:

    A) bind to receptors on the target cell membrane & react with an enzyme that activates a protein
    B) pass through the target cell membrane & signal DNA to form a new protein
    C) all of the choices are correct
    D) none of the choices are correct
    2.
    The hormone Glucagon acts to:

    A) none of the choices are correct
    B) promotes break down of glycogen to form glucose
    C) promote glucose storage
    D) promote glucose entry into the cells
    3.
    What is the correct sequence of events in the control of hormone production?

    A) stimulate endocrine gland, release hormone, hormone acts on target cell, desired change reached, hormone production continues
    B) answer a is true for non-steroids only, and answer b is true for steroids only
    C) stimulate endocrine gland, release hormone, hormone acts on target cell, desired change reached, hormone production stops
    D) answer a is true for steroids only, and answer b is true for non-steroids only
    4.
    Testes are considered part of a male’s endocrine system?

    A) True
    B) False
    5.
    Non-steroid hormones act by:

    A) bind to receptors on the target cell membrane and react with an enzyme that activates a protein
    B) none of the choices are correct
    C) pass through the target cell membrane and signal DNA to produce a new protein
    D) all of the choices are correct
    6.
    The endocrine system control of homeostasis is faster and longer lasting than the nervous system control of homeostasis.

    A) True
    B) False
    7.
    Type I Diabetes occurs when:

    A) too little insulin is produced
    B) too much insulin is produced
    C) no glucose is produced
    D) too little glycogen is produced
    E) too much glycogen is produced
    8.
    Steroid hormones can pass through cell membranes because they are lipid soluble.

    A) True
    B) False
    9.
    Which of the following is NOT TRUE about steroids?

    A) produce specific proteins
    B) are lipid soluble
    C) all of the choices ARE true
    D) slow acting
    E) bind to receptors on the cell membrane
    10.
    The non-steroidal hormones Glucagon and Insulin maintain homeostasis because Glucagon ________, while Insulin _____________.

    A) raises blood sugar, lowers blood sugar
    B) lowers blood sugar, raises blood sugar
    C) regulates blood glucose, regulates sodium levels
    D) none of the choices are correct
    E) regulates sodium levels, regulates blood glucose

    • ANSWER:
      My advice to you is to start learning. Jonesing for free answers to your homework so you don’t have to learn when you’re obviously in a position where you’re supposed to be learning isn’t going to help you and it just polluting YA with unnecessary questions. If everyone did their homework on YA, it would probably self destruct for want of people to play your irresponsible little game. Be responsible. Study, Learn.


Correct Blood Sugar Level Chart

Previously identified as juvenile juvenile diabetes, form one adult onset diabetes often takes place in little ones and youthful adults. On this issue, the system is unable to generate insulin, that is the hormone accountable for converting glucose, starches, as well as other types of diet into power. An unusual type of diabetic issues, with only 5-10% of individuals impacted, it could possibly be managed working with insulin remedy, actual exercise, including a nicely thought-out sort one all forms of diabetes eating plan.

Producing healthy and balanced food stuff options is usually the very first guidance of medical doctors for people today with diabetes mellitus. Each individual food items which you feed on has impact on your own glucose levels degree and if you could be not cautious along with your consumption, you may stop up setting up diabetes-related issues. If you might be not incredibly keen on nutritious meals, a consultation having a registered dietician will most probably guide. Then, with frequent apply and just a little self-discipline on your own portion, it is actually achievable to manage diabetes mellitus.

Why is model one diabetes mellitus weight loss plan imperative?

A number of factors of adult onset diabetes is usually managed by the patient-amount of foodstuff eaten, what exactly is eaten, diabetic menu frequency of blood sugar levels checking, actual physical exercise ranges, and medicine.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Christians: Explain how your faith is “evidence”…-_-?
    My used-to-be-Christian friend had this thing called “faith”. And he that feeling of being “felt” by God like most of you seem to claim to have, too. Now, believe it or not, but only a minority of you “feel” God…

    My point is. My used-to-be-Christian friend became an Atheist due to the fact, that he finally realized, and his psychologist and general doctor agreed, that his feelings towards God became a placebo that just boosted his happiness level. It was actually a bad thing, because, even though he didn’t notice it was going on, somehow, he was going through depression at the same time (see analogy below).

    So, my question is… how do you know you don’t have what he had? Maybe the only difference was that he wasn’t as ignorant to what else it could’ve been.

    Analogy to above: The average, “correct” blood sugar to be at is 90. When a diabetic’s blood sugar gets too high (also low, but this is an example), then they have to take insulin to lower it. When that happens, the blood sugar will begin to drop, below 90 even, then they would have to take a slight amount of glucose to raise it a bit. If you looked at these like lines, they begin making a wave motion, from high above 90, to low below 90, to med above 90, to low below 90, and eventually, it balances out. Anyway, that’s my analogy to the “faith” and how it makes someone happy, then overly depressed, whether u notice it or not (believe it or not but it’s possible to pretend the depression isn’t there, then you won’t notice it, but you still go through symptoms).

    And, btw, I don’t want to offend any diabetics. I don’t know exactly what you go through to take care of your blood sugar, but I do know how the blood sugar chart works.
    Just to add: The 1st recommended category was R&S, the 2nd was Mythology and Folklore.
    @ No splash without Frog: That’s why there’re quotations around them.
    @Logan can’t think of a SN: I can’t tell if you realize this or not, but I’m an Atheist.
    @ The Brad: http://godisimaginary.com/i8.htm
    @Mohama Shat: You proved nothing… Belief isn’t evidence… evidence is evidence.
    @Seattle M’s: I don’t think you actually read my description. You answered with what I just explained is a fallacy. I recommend you read Rick Lev’s answer.
    @Word: I think I didn’t make my statement clear, and this goes to everyone. Read my analogy, and think of the “90″ line, as “happy”, Not average, but happy. Then think of what’s above it as more than happy, and below it as… not that happy. If you’re a normal person, who doesn’t use faith as a placebo, then you should be able to stay within the “happy zone” as long as possible, some things may bring you to become overly happy, but then the next day, the day isn’t as great, and you feel… well… not that happy. It’s normal. Or the other way around, you could feel sad one day, then something better happens, then you raise to become somewhat overly happy. Eventually, you’ll balance out again, and just become a happy person in general. It’s the same as what someone w/o diabetes goes through with their blood sugar, sometimes it’s slightly higher than what it’s supposed to be, then it droops downwards, then balances out. But, if it’s too drastic, like with what diabetics go thro

    • ANSWER:
      Well, I personally never feel God’s presence.. I’ve just seen his fingerprint in someone else’s life in things that were too much of a coincidence.. I don’t expect this to be enough to convert anyone, as other people’s claims have never been enough for me.. But seeing her life, and how things just always worked out for her as if someone was watching over her is why I personally believe.

      Either way, your logic makes no sense.. you’re basically saying we should never feel happiness because we’re going to feel depressed.. we should all be emotionless zombies.. great way to think. And I can’t believe a psychologist abuses his influence to push his own beliefs.

      You agree with him, so you don’t care.. but all he did was tell him to “Stop going to them for comfort.. stay here with me, and we’ll give you the right meds to fatten up our wallets. Let’s get you in that zombie mind state… stop feeling emotions and be level.”

      Psychiatry is another form of social control, taking away people’s individuality to be just like everyone else in the herd. And they make a killing pushing their drugs.. Some people are a real danger to society and/or themselves.. but most of that crap is bullshit

      I was labeled clinically depressed when I was younger and they got me on their pills, but I never took them because I didn’t want to depend on drugs to be happy. I just stopped going and dealt with it on my own.. and yes, I still get moments of depression, but I also have happier times too.. the same as anybody else.. I relied on myself to get better by always looking for positive, uplifting, empowering quotes, books, music, and movies, and those have helped a great deal..

      edit:
      OK, I misread you, sorry.. but either way, he’s unbalanced.. no matter what, he’s going to need something that tricks his mind into feeling better. If you take drugs to feel that happiness, it’s going to unbalance out just the same.. And if you do it on your own.. I’m still not a “happy” person today.. I just get by.. people are depressed because of a chemical imbalance.. their dopamine levels are lower than normal.. drugs can increase dopamine levels, but your brain has a set amount of dopamine, so regardless of what increases it, it’s going to be depleted just the same and take you down..

  2. QUESTION:
    How should i take creatine with my diabetes (type 1)?
    I have a question about taking creatine. Im a 16 year old type 1 diabetic and i previously ordered a CellTech Hardcore creatine, which has about 75g of sugar, if im correct. I was just wondering if anyone can correct me on how to take this product so that it doesnt affect my diabetes. If i take insulin (humulin) before i consume the creatine, would it help maintain my blood sugar level so that it would not go off the chart? i also read that insulin helps the creatine to go in the muscles so is taking insulin a must before consuming creatine?

    Thanks in advance! =)

    • ANSWER:
      Personally i think at 16 you are to ypoung to be using this? What is it you hope to gain through its use? One of the safety issues of it is renal problems which as a diabetic you already have an increased risk of. If you are seriously considering using creatine I would ask you to talk to your doctor before you take it as I do not know whether or not it has any effect on your medication. It is also more effective when used with high GI carbohydrates which will spike your blood glucose levels and are best avoided.
      See article below


Controlling Blood Sugar Levels With Diet

There are two hormones that play the largest role in controlling blood sugar levels glucagon and insulin . These two hormones are antagonistic fashion is actually another. Another way to think this relationship is, for example, “Ying and Yang, one of the hormone level is high, the other hormone levels are low. Hormonal level that is significant, depends on what is your blood sugar. The brain constantly monitor blood sugar levels.

When blood sugar is low, an injection of the hormone glucagon will tell your body storage sites (primarily liver) to start releasing the glucose into the bloodstream. An injection of the hormone glucagon tells the body to put more sugar in the blood. The result is that the storage of glucose stops, stops production of fat and sugar is released into the bloodstream.

When blood sugar is high, insulin is in charge. Insulin is released to tell the body to put the excess sugar in the tissues. Insulin tells the body’s store of glycogen storage of excess sugar in the form, also tells the liver cells to stop making glucose. It also tells us that the fatty liver and fat cells.

Although these two hormones act in opposite directions, they are actually achieving the same goal. These two hormones is to maintain blood sugar levels. This “stable” level, which like the brain and allows it to operate at its best. The wonderful thing is done without human conscious, knowing that this is happening.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    I have been Type II diabetic for 8 years. Can I control my blood sugar levels with diet and exercise, alone?
    I take Glucovance and occassionally took Avandia. Headlines , today, said that 43% of those taking Avandia have significant heart problems. I am on a low carb diet and have lost weight. I exercise moderately yet nothing I seem to do stabilizes my blood sugar levels. My range stays between 80 and 170 with some lows and highs in the dangerous range(45&365). Any resources or personal experiences would help me out.

    • ANSWER:
      This is hard to answer. Even on the medication, you say your blood sugars are getting out of control occasionally. Your diet and exercise seem to be good and stable. The truth is, no matter whether you are on medication or not, you are still going to have some highs and lows. The purpose of medications like Glucovance is to increase insulin production. There are tests your doctor can do that can determine the levels of insulin you are producing and see if these medications are helping. The best advice I can give you is to speak to your doctor about it. He is the one who can advise you about what may be best for your health. I have read that both Glucovance and Avandia can have dangerous complications, so maybe there are some different medications you can try. I would honestly just ask your doctor if it would be safe to try being off your medications for a period of 2-3 months and seeing how you do. Good luck!

  2. QUESTION:
    Can blood sugar levels change a lot in less than a minute?
    I am type 2 and I try controlling my blood sugar level with diet and weight loss. I use a freestyle flash meter and I check it morning and night but last night I checked it and it was a whopping 234 so I thought that was just way out of range for me so I immediately checked it again and it was 115. Could my meter be bad or does sugar fluctuate that much in such a short time?

    • ANSWER:
      when you get readings like that within a minute of eachother use your control solution and check your strips/meter. if it is in range test again. three tests give you a more accurate idea. the meter will fluctuate some in readings but it should not be that much. If your first is 234 sencond 115 and third around the 234, then assume you are on the higher side. maybe wait an hour and test again, or even in 15 minutes. if you still get really off numbers like that call the meter company and ask them to send you a replacement because yours is off. they do this free of charge, as long as you mail yours to them.

  3. QUESTION:
    Fluctuating Fasting Blood Sugar Levels with Diet?
    My fasting blood sugar last year used to be 115-119 mg/dl. After that I started exercise and some diet control and fasting BS stays between 85-95 mg/dl. Now if I eat lot of sugar foods in a stretch of 3-4 days then the fasting blood sugar next days usually reads around 103-108 mg/dl range. But after 2-3 days it comes down to 90-95 mg/dl. I have been doing exercise regularly.

    Is it OK to let my fasting blood sugar go up to 100-110 mg/dl range when I eat high sugar food and let it get down in 2-3 days to below 100 mg/dl. Is this OK or do I need to always keep it under 100 mg/dl by not eating high sugar snacks. My doctor told me not to check my blood sugar often because he noticed that I am usually maintaining it below 100 mg/dl most of the time. But I like to assess my body and my fasting blood sugar pattern when I relax my diet. So I do check my fasting BS at home everytime I eat excess of high fatty or sugar meals.

    Please advise if I can let myself loose on diet occasionally and let the Fasting BS read between 100-110 mg/dl as long as it reads below 100 mg/dl in next 3-4 days.

    PS: For clarity of readers. I am not a diabetic nor do I take any medicines. The reason I go to my doctor is because of my high cholesterol that is controlled by exercise.
    My blood sugar 2 hours after meals is between 100-115 mg/dl.
    My HbA1C is 5.7%

    • ANSWER:
      If you were non-diabetic, then eating sugary foods wouldn’t be elevating your blood sugar well into the next day. I’ve tested enough non-diabetics in my life to know that they are usually below 100 mg/dL by two hours after eating a meal, regardless of the carbohydrates, and 100% normal by the next morning.

      Also, your fasting levels last year and this year (after indulging in sweets) are firmly in pre-diabetic range. Pre-diabetes IS diabetes; it’s just diabetes caught early. Pre-diabetes is not the first step on the path to diabetes. There are many earlier steps, like metabolic disorder and insulin resistance. Based on your high cholesterol and pre-diabetic fasting blood sugar, I’d say you do have metabolic disorder and are diabetic, but early staged and well controlled by diet and exercise. I’m not criticizing you. In fact, I think you’re doing a great job. I just also think that your doctor is doing you a disservice by not emphasizing to you that you are diabetic.

      Here’s another problem – because you don’t test after meals, you don’t see how high your blood sugar is after eating. In the early stages of diabetes, blood sugar can drop after a while into normal or near-normal range, so it’s entirely possible you’re spiking well into the 200s. We just can’t know.

      As for whether it’s “okay,” that just depends. If you’re over 140 mg/dL for several hours, I’d say that’s not okay to do very often. As a diabetic, I aim to fast under 100 mg/dL always because it’s truly normal, but a few days of slightly elevated fasting blood sugar won’t give you complications. Your blood sugar after meals may be damaging you, though. It’d depend on how high you’re spiking and how long you’re staying up there, as well as how often you are breaking your diet.

  4. QUESTION:
    High blood sugar levels 14 or 15 at bedtime, but eats very little through out the day?
    My mother is 81 and has diabeites uses pills and diet not insulin to control her blood sugar levels, with her diet she eats very little and her blood sugur levels will be 14 or 15 at bed time sometimes,what would cause this. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      The author means high blood sugar. Europeans use a different scale than Americans for measuring blood sugar. Their 14 or 15 blood sugar is about the same as 260 for us.

      http://diabeticgourmet.com/Tools_and_Calculators/convert-sugar-readings.shtml

      As for the original question… It could be stress, wearing off of the pills, or a rebound where the body fights to increase it’s bloodsugar because it is too low. You should probably consult a doctor who is familiar with your mother.

      Good Luck!

  5. QUESTION:
    I manage my fasting blood sugar level below125 mg by exercise & diet. Do I need medication?
    I hate going to a Doctor. I am a prediabetic but I manage to keep things under control. At times the FBS level climbs to 140 but again with will I bring it back to 125. Do I need to do what I hate the most – go to a Doctor ? Do I need medication ?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey Stoic. It is very important to see your doctor if you are a diabetic.It is important to do a base level investigations including sugar profile,blood lipids,kidney and liver function tests and to record blood pressure.Diabetic patients commonly become hypertensive and develop high cholestrol as well. These two are killers.Dont listen to any one. Please go and see your doctor and have an assessment.
      You cannot do any investigations-blood tests etc without seeing your doctor in Britain.

  6. QUESTION:
    Question about blood sugar levels?
    I was recently diagnosed with type II diabetes. My fasting blood sugar was 315. My doctor wanted to put me on some medication, but the pills she prescribed would cost me over 0 per month, which I can not afford. She said the only other option for me would be insulin, which at 32 years old, I absolutely do not want to be dependent on for the rest of my life. I spoke with some members of my family and my husband’s family that have diabetes, and they all agree that insulin is not a good option for me.

    I have heard that exercising, changing my diet to a low sugar / low carb diet, and losing weight can actually make my diabetes reverse itself. I would like to try losing weight and changing my diet to bring down my blood sugar levels. Eating very little carbs & drinking lots of water has brought down my average blood sugar to 215 when fasting – around 300 after a complete meal. Sometimes after meals, if I can not exercise because of long hours at my desk job, my blood sugar will raise to as high as 380 or so, but most times it is 300 or less. My concern is whether this can be harmful to my body to have blood sugars levels of 215-350 on an every day basis while I try to get my diabetes under control? And what kind of harm can this do to my body? I really want to try to beat this on my own if possible, but I am scared to have high blood sugar on a daily basis while I try to undo the damage I have already done to my body by being overweight & not taking care of myself properly. Thanks for any advice & info.

    • ANSWER:
      Blood sugar that high on a regular basis can be very damaging to your body. Levels over 140 mg/dL contribute to diabetic complications and you’re essentially double that all day, every day. I credit you for wanting to lose weight and adhere to a strict diet, but unfortunately you can’t get your blood sugar down to a healthy range on your own. Don’t feel ashamed or defeated. Insulin and oral medications are not a failure. They’re going to help us live a very long time hopefully.

      I don’t know where you live, but in the United States, Metformin–the most commonly prescribed diabetic drug–costs per month at Target and Wal-Mart pharmacies. I suspect your doctor prescribed you something other than Metformin because she believes that Metformin won’t be enough to get your blood sugar under control. Metformin, unlike a lot of other diabetic drugs, does not stimulate your pancreas to produce more insulin. Metformin reduces the amount of glucose your liver releases and makes you more sensitive to the insulin you make. Thus, if you are very insulin deficient, Metformin probably won’t be enough. And with an FBG of 315 mg/dL, that might be what she thinks. I always think Metformin is worth a try, though, because of the low incidence of serious side effects and hypoglycemia.

      Also, I know diabetics who had fasting levels as high or higher than yours who controlled blood sugar only on Metformin. My random blood sugar (non-fasting) when I was diagnosed was in the mid-300s, but I’m only on Metformin. My fasting blood sugar now ranges from 70-95 every day. It’s possible on a low-carbohydrate diet. I strongly suggest you make another appointment ASAP and demand Metformin. You have nothing to lose even if Metformin doesn’t work. Plus, Metformin sometimes helps with weight loss.

      Finally, I encourage you to lose weight and try to go off medication or insulin one day. I do want to caution you about the word “reversal.” I have lost nearly 100 pounds since my diagnosis and I am still very much diabetic. My doctor promised me cures if only I could get the fat off because I was so young (late 20s) and otherwise in good health. Now, don’t get me wrong – blood sugar control has gotten easier and I have been able to reduce my medication. There’s no cure in sight, though. By the time blood sugar gets up as high as yours and mine, the pancreas has already lost a lot of function. We could get down to a perfect weight and possibly still not have enough function to control blood sugar without meds. And even if we could, we’d probably need to stay on a low-carbohydrate diet for life, which I’d be more than happy to do if it meant going off medication. I want you to strive for a goal, but I don’t want you to get your hopes up about a cure that’s just not going to happen. I’ve never known a diabetic to become cured through weight loss. I have known MANY diabetics who have lost weight, gone off meds, and controlled blood sugar through diet and exercise. That’s management, not reversal, but it’s something that I would love to have one day. And probably you would, too. So, all the best, and I hope your doctor signs off on the Metformin.

  7. QUESTION:
    can deop prevera shots raise your blood sugar levels?
    My sugars were controlled till it seems I started that shot and now my sugars appear to be way way high even though with diet and exercise I have lost 61 pounds.

    • ANSWER:
      Depo-Provera tends to alter levels of blood sugar, so diabetic women need to be carefully observed by their doctors when taking Depo-Provera.

      Depo-Provera may cause fluid retention, so if you have conditions that may be worsened by fluid retention, such as epilepsy, migraine headaches, asthma, heart disease, or kidney disease, make sure the doctor is aware of it.

      Be careful ~

  8. QUESTION:
    How long until I see results (blood sugar drop) from taking Metformin?
    I have been taking 500 mg of Metformin for 1 week now along with a very precise diet (50 carbs a meal) and have not seen a drop in my blood sugar levels. They remain between 290 on an empby stomach and 350-400 2 hrs after eating. Is Metformin or blood sugars somthing that takes longer to control?

    • ANSWER:
      Because metformin can have some intestinal side effects that are unpleasant but usually temporary, people usually start off at 500 mg/day and gradually ramp up to a higher dose, depending on how well they tolerate it and on how well it is controlling their BG levels. It can a week or two to see any effect.

      That said, it’s quite possible that 50 grams of carbs per meal is too high for you. I know it would be waaay too high for me — I try for a maximum of 15 g per meal, and no more than 60-75 g per day. If I ate 50 g at one sitting, my BG would skyrocket.

      I currently take 1500 mg metformin per day (500 mg 3 times a day). With the combination of metformin, regular exercise, and much tighter carb restrictions than you are currently on, my BG levels are as follows:
      fasting: 75-80
      peak (about 45 minutes after meals): 95-120
      two hours after meals: return to normal, about 85
      A1c: 5.1

      Here’s a link to the best piece of advice I got when I was first diagnosed as a T2, several years ago. It used to be reposted almost daily in the alt.support.diabetes newsgroup, before it was overrun by trolls.

      Jennifer’s Advice to the Newly Diagnosed:

      http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org/NewlyDiagnosed.htm

  9. QUESTION:
    What do my blood sugar levels mean?
    I had a test last week for gestational diabetes and I failed the test (non-fasting, 50g glucose, blood tested 1 hour afterwards, result 9.2 mmol/L). I have another test coming up this week for confirmation. I know if it is confirmed I will get education about it but this diagnosis doesn’t just affect me, it affects my baby too so I couldn’t just wait a week not knowing. I got a blood testing machine and have been testing my blood sugar levels and googling it. I am now really confused. Can someone (with diabetes or a nurse or something) please tell me what my blood sugars mean?

    Yesterday
    5 hours after lunch – 4.7 mmol/L
    6 hours after lunch – 3.9 mmol/L
    1 hour after dinner – 5.9
    2 hours after dinner – 5.2

    Today
    Before breakfast – 4.0
    2 hours after breakfast – 6.7
    2 hours after lunch – 4.8

    Sorry I don’t know how to convert those numbers into the ones that are used in the US. As far as I can tell from googling, all of the numbers are normal except the one after breakfast today. What does that mean? Does it mean that my normal diet is enough to control it except for my breakfast (2 slices of raisin toast this morning)? The test was done in the morning too.

    Background info. regarding my risk factors – my dad and uncle have type 2 diabetes. I was at the top end of my healthy weight range before I got pregnant. Sorry the question is so long and thank you!
    Sorry I didn’t mean to offend anyone by implying that only overweight people got diabetes. It was my midwife that told me that was a risk factor. She was asking about my weight prior to pregnancy and looking at how much weight I had put on during the pregnancy.

    On the day I got readings in the normal range I ate a chicken and salad sandwich and a banana for lunch and pasta with tomato, spinach and pumpkin sauce for dinner so it was still carbs.

    • ANSWER:
      All the readings are OK except for the 6.7 and of course, the 9.2.

      It would have been helpful to know what you ate at the meals after which the blood sugar was in target range.

      It could well be that you are glucose-intolerant and that’s why you had high readings after the GD test (pure glucose) and the raisin toast (all carb becomes pure sugar in the blood, even whole grains). If that’s the case, then you might be lucky enough to be able to control your blood sugar simply by watching the carbs.

      As for your risk factors, it is a cruel myth that being overweight causes diabetes. It does not. Type 2 diabetes is strongly genetic.

  10. QUESTION:
    What are normal Blood Sugar levels in 2 or 3 year old healthy kid.?
    Family history
    1) Mom was diagnosed with type 2 at 38 years and started on insulin at 49 years.
    2) Dad was daignosed with type 2 at 49/50 and went on insulin at 65.
    3) One brother (out of two) was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at 9 years.
    4) I had gestational diabetes in first pregnancy and was started on insulin from 12th week (started with 5 NPH). I had very good control during pregnancy though.
    Tested 7 times a day. Made drastic changes to my diet. Very few times my levels were above normal. Target was 130 after 1 hour. and less than 90 fasting. I was within range 90% of the time.

    My child’s readings.

    My kid is 2 1/2 year old now. Her 2 hour test was 115. Tested at home after dinner.

    Her Dinner was,

    1) White Rice cooked (2/3 cup)
    2) peas and paneer curry
    (Peas 2 about tsps,
    cheese half ounce,
    tamato + onion gravy 2tsp.)
    3) Plain yogurt 1/3 rd cup.
    4) Bite size snickers bar.

    She took her main meal in about 25 mins and ate her snickers 10 mins later.

    • ANSWER:
      Normal for anyone – kids or not is approximately 90-145. Anything over 200 and you can look at diabetes as something to be investigated.

      Having had gestational diabetes you do have a higher chance of developing T2 diabetes – exercising and watching what you eat can definitely make a HUGE difference.

      A non-diabetic will have almost no fluctuation with their eating – whereas a pre-diabetic can.

      In children that young – they will get Type 1 diabetes – or juvenille as some people call it.

      115 is just fine.

      Just look out for other symptoms. Excessing thirst, frequent urinating, lethargy without normal reasoning, sweet smelling breath.

      Check out websites such as www.diabetes-book.com and read up on it more.

      I am a type 2 diabetic diagnosed at age 39.

  11. QUESTION:
    What is going on with my Blood Sugar levels ? ?
    I take my blood sugar in the morning , it runs between 90 and 120
    at evening before dinner 122. 128
    Ok this morning I take it and its 111 , tonite after a very stressful
    day and then coming home too argue with with my sister , I take it and it says HI Keytones , !! Ok I take it again it went down ..
    Does stress raise the Blood Sugar that much ? I am not on meds yet
    I am trying to control it with diet and exercise … Its been doing
    pretty good … My meter is a Reli-on , not sure if its the best
    but It was all I could afford at the time , the strips are so expensive ..
    Is it possible that the meter is off ? Yes I suppose , but the stress today was unbelievable ….
    Any thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      Stress can make your sugars go crazy. Look at what you ate during the day as that could cause a spike as well if you are stressed. If you are getting a cold or the flu on top of the stress you are having, it is possible for your sugars to go crazy.

      If you get a unexpected result, test your blood sugar again as well as your keytones. It is always possible that there was an error on the test.

      Reli-on is an OK meter and strips. All meters can be off, regardless of cost. If you see this happen again, bring it up to your doc.

  12. QUESTION:
    I have type 2 diabetes and my fasting blood sugar levels are over 200?
    I am taking 17 units of Lantus at night plus 2500 mg of Glucophage during the day. I can control my sugars during the day with diet and medication, but something happens while I am sleeping. I am not eating alot at bedtime and what I do eat is low in sugars & carbs. Usually fruit/veggies & peanut butter.

    Right now, my Doctor & Diabetic Educator think it is all hormonal and not much I can do to control it. We have tried alot of different medication combos but so far nothing helps.

    Anyone else have this problem and what has helped?

    • ANSWER:
      You have something called “dawn phenomenon”. It is actually quite common. What actually happens is that your blood sugar drops during the night and your body tries to combat it by raising the blood sugar level. Talk to your doctor about increasing the Lantus and adding a light bedtime snack to carry you over. If the doctor doesn’t know about this factor, you may need to seek the advice of another diabetes professional.

  13. QUESTION:
    Testing Blood Sugar levels?
    Hey there,
    I am a pre diabetic and got a bld sugar monitor.
    Before eating I tested and it was 5.0 (pretty good)
    I had an omelette with tomato, grn pepper, onion and mushrooms. Waited about an hour and tested. My bld sugar was 8.1
    Is this normal? I have been on a low carb controlled diet for 4 weeks and have dropped 10lbs…but isn’t 8.1 a little high after eating an omelette and consuming no breads or grains?
    I am in Canada…
    so any canadians on the board might possibly be able to help?

    • ANSWER:

  14. QUESTION:
    Whats up with my Blood Glucose Levels?
    I am a type 2 insulin dependent diabetic, I also take medication. Yesterday I decided that today I would try to control my glucose levels via diet and cinnamon & Chromium and NOT take my insulin. My insulin regime is Levemir 40 units morning and bed time and Novo rapid before each meal, typical 30-35 units.

    Doing my blood this morning they were 13.0 which was very high due to a large bar of chocolate I had before bed last night. Here were the rest of my blood sugar levels for today with NO insulin.

    07:22 13.0 mmol/l – before breakfast
    10:45 11.2 mmol/l – after breakfast
    13:17 7.0 mmol/l – before lunch
    13:40 8.7 Mil/l – after lunch
    18:08 6.4 mmol/l – before dinner
    19:55 6.2 mmol/l – before dinner

    Is there any Diabetic expert out there that can tell me why my glucose levels are relativley good after not taking my insulin?

    Other info –
    age 31
    weight 18 stone
    height 6ft

    Diabetic since 2005

    • ANSWER:
      Diabetes is for life, and you will need to take medication for the rest of your life. This is what most people diagnosed with adult-onset, or type 2 diabetes, are told. One in 10 people over 40 now suffer from the life-threatening condition.

      Yet, complete reversal, without the need for medication, is being reported by an increasing number of former diabetics by following a low ‘glycemic load’ diet, in combination with a mineral supplement and the spice cinnamon.

      World renowned diabetes expert Fedon Lindberg from Norway has reported complete reversal of type 2 diabetes, the most common form, even in those injecting insulin, by this radical non-drug approach. ‘A balanced low glycemic load (GL) diet, coupled with a healthy lifestyle, can also achieve non-diabetic sugar levels without the need for medication – therefore ‘reversing’ the disease,’ he says. He has challenged the Norwegian Diabetes Association to change its advice.

      Despite 15 controlled studies on chromium, 13 of which show benefit for stabilising blood sugar, most diabetics are still being told ‘you get all the nutrients you need in a well-balanced diet’.

      This is simply untrue for chromium. A really good, wholefood diet might give you 50mcg a day. You need 500mcg a day if you are diabetic. (It is very safe to take this much as the toxic level is above 10,000mcg.)

      Chromium is in unrefined foods. Sugar, white flour and white rice have up to 98 per cent of the chromium removed. It works by improving the sensitivity to insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar levels. Insulin insensitivity, called insulin resistance, is the first indication of pre-diabetes, and affects the majority of overweight people.

      Cinnamon, the other key natural remedy for blood sugar regulation, contains something called MCHP which mimics the action of insulin. There is a concentrated extract of cinnamon called Cinnulin® which is high in MCHP for those who do not like eating cinnamon every day.

      In one study, volunteers with type 2 diabetes were given cinnamon capsules after meals. All responded to the cinnamon within weeks, lowering blood sugar levels by about 20 per cent. Some of the volunteers even achieved normal blood sugar levels. Tellingly, blood sugar levels started creeping up again after the diabetics stopped taking cinnamon.

      The principle behind the low GL diet is eating foods which provide a slow release of sugar, together with protein foods. For example, having a few nuts with an apple, or seeds on an oat-based cereal, or fish with a small serving of brown rice. This leads to less hunger, reduced sugar cravings, increased energy and rapid weight loss, as well as stable blood sugar levels. But you have to do it properly – eating a strict 45 GLs a day.

      If you have diabetes, I recommend supplementing 400mcg of chromium with breakfast, and 200mcg at lunch (it comes in 200mcg capsules). If you do not, but have low energy, weight gain or any other ‘pre-diabetic’ indicators, take 200mcg a day, with breakfast.

      For cinnamon, you want 1g a day, or 500mg of a cinnamon extract. Half a teaspoon is 1g. If you are taking sulfonylurea medication be aware this might quickly become unnecessary and, in fact, cause too low blood sugar levels (a ‘hypo’) since the combination of diet plus supplements is so effective. This kind of approach is also great for prevention, and weight loss. Daily exercise is also an important part of the equation and it sounds like you are already doing this and taking your supplements. So it seems you have taken the right road to reversal.

      Check with your doctor on any medical advice. Good luck.

  15. QUESTION:
    At what point are blood sugar levels dangerous to my baby?
    Hi, I am about 4.5 weeks pregnant and have gestational diabetes. I had it with my last child, controlled it with diet and he is luckily fine. This time I am older and my fasting is often over 100 but not higher than 110. My after meal numbers are fine, usually in the 90′s.
    Any tips on how to get my fasting number lower? I am exercising, cut out sweets and balancing my carbs.
    Thank you!
    I go to the dr. next wednesday for my first check up. Is it ok to wait that long?
    Thank you everyone. I have not been re-tested for gestational diabetes but I know from my numbers that I have it again. I don’t have diabetes normally. My fasting was just 88 and 93 and I passed the glucose tolerance test as well. It stinks to have this the entire pregnancy but I will do whatever it takes to have a healthy baby.
    Thank you Doug. It’s frustrating because my a1c has been between 4.0 and 4.5. My fasting has been between 88 and 93 so I am not considered diabetic! I am overweight though-having children and no time to take care of myself has done that. I am going to take this weight off for good now so I don’t expect to ever be a full diabetic.

    • ANSWER:
      If you currently have “gestational diabetes” at 4.5 weeks, it’s more than gestational diabetes. It’s diabetes. Given that, in addition to an OB, you should be seeing an endocrinologist (diabetic specialist). While the “medical jury” is still out on this one and there are certainly varying opinions, gestational diabetes usually manifests after 13 weeks. Anything prior to that is regular diabetes and needs to very closely managed. Best wishes!

      Also, most docs will carefully watch blood sugars on patients that have had GD with a previous pregnancy and not wait until 28 weeks for labs.

  16. QUESTION:
    Why is my blood sugar so high?
    I am 39 weeks pregnant, diagnosed with gestational diabetes, and being induced on Friday. My blood sugar levels have been fine (controlled by diet, it hasn’t been high enough to require insulin). My fasting numbers are always between 75 and 95, and after meals they are typically below 110 – including meals that have a small amount of sugar.

    Yesterday, my between lunch and dinner snack was a muffin, and it had sugar in it. Then I had a completely sugar free dinner a few hours later. Two hours after my dinner, my blood sugar was 130. I assumed it was the muffin, so when I recorded it in my sheet for the diabetes clinic I made a note about the muffin so the nurse would know why it was high.

    Then today, I had NO SUGAR. At all. All day. My numbers were all good, until tonight. I just checked it (2 hours after dinner) and it’s 138.

    What in the world is going on??? I don’t understand how my numbers at night at high all of a sudden, especially after having no sugar!
    Wow, Pilot of the Storm. Thanks for that wonderful assessment.

    My baby is actually not going to die, he is quite healthy, and monitored twice a week via ultrasound and a fetal monitoring device.

    I am actually not fat, I have been unhealthily underweight my entire life regardless of diet and have a VERY hard time gaining weight.

    Not to mention that I do not have a problem “putting down the fork”, I actually have trouble finishing an entire meal due to my stomach being so small.

    Troll.

    • ANSWER:
      In pregnancy sugar can be high due to the effects of some hormones. How ever U will be normal after giving birth to the baby.

  17. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know how long it takes for the body to be damaged by high blood sugar over 200?
    I do not have medical insurance so I cannot afford to get my blood sugar to healthy levels. I was told I had type 2 diabeties 6 years ago and because of stressful events in my life over the last 3 years I cannot control the blood sugar with diet alone. I have been to emergency rooms but the help they give doesn’t work and the side affects from the pills is worse than the way I feel when blood sugar is high. Plus my depression is getting worse.

    I have searched and searched for help but I keep getting put off.

    I now do not know where to turn.

    • ANSWER:
      What are the side effects? Gastro-intestinal discomfort as a result of Metformin is usually temporary. If you feel weak and dizzy, that’s normal when your blood sugar is dropping to healthier levels and also temporary.

      The side effects may make you feel worse than high blood sugar, but chances are they are short lived and non-lethal, whereas diabetic complications can be permanent and are extremely dangerous.

      As for how long complications take, that’s difficult to say. The rate at which complications occur is highly variable, but six years is more than enough time. Chances are you have already damaged your body, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t get control now. Some complications can be greatly improved and managed by proper diabetes treatment.

  18. QUESTION:
    Why would fasting Blood Glucose be consistently higher than Bedtime levels?
    I am trying to get my blood sugar levels into a normal range with exercise and diet. I am not on insulin or drugs and have not yet been diagnosed with diabetes but my MD is concerned about my fasting blood glucose.

    What’s frustrating is that I am really watching what I eat and controlling my snacking and have a Bedtime BG of 95-104 (5.3-5.8) and yet my FBG seems to consistently be 108-110 (6.0-6.1). Why…where is the glucose coming from if I have been at rest and haven’t eaten for over 10 hours?

    I thought it may be related to eating too late and/or too heavy a meal the night before and perhaps was still digesting after going to bed, but have watched and contolled what I have eaten during the last couple of days without any apparent impact.

    • ANSWER:
      When you fast, many times the liver thinks the bodies blood sugar is going too low, and it will release sugar into the blood stream. Diabetics call this ” dawn phenomenon”. It happens to many of us in the morning when we do our fasting blood sugar test, but a hour later, it is usually within normal range. It can also happen to diabetics when they exercise. It is just the liver trying to keep something from going wrong. You are right though, about your evening meal. If it was something with a lot of carbs, it can cause the fasting test in the morning to be high. Especially if you eat fiber like grains in bread, or eat oatmeal. If I have oatmeal, my blood sugar will stay up forever it seems. If I just eat a small amount of it, my blood sugar will rise some, but will stay stable for hours, I don’t need a snack. Next time you are going to have a test, make you last meal something lower in carbs and see what happens. Even non diabetics experience dawn phenomenon.

  19. QUESTION:
    32 weeks pregnancy , detected with high sugar levels.What are the safe sugar/glucose levels during pregnancy?
    HI, Im 32 weeks pregnant. During my 24th week the glucose tolerance test was negative. But the recent test showed my fasting blood sugar level to be 101 and PP BS to be 114. The Doctor has asked me to constantly monitor the blood sugar levels at home, 8 times a day..phew..and as well control on diet and exercises. What are the normal blood sugar levels during pregnancy. I have a history of PC OS and as well my mother is a diabetic. does this mean even Iam a diabetic now and what are the proposed risks to my unborn child?

    • ANSWER:
      i was had this issue with both my pregnancies my first it was untreated and she came out almost 10 ibs with my son (he is 4 months old now) i had to monitor my blood same as you before breakfast 1 hour after before snacks and after lunch, dinner etc etc… Normally its ideal if your fasting (when you wake up) glucose level is under 95 after lunch and snacks under 140 is the highest period. It is important to watch what you eat and walk alot. drink plenty of water because if not you will have a sick huge baby. Mine like i said was almost 10ibs and when i delivered her they had to break her clavicle in order to get her out and she now has seizure problems. With my son my sugars could not be controlled with diet alone i was testing at sugar levels of 240 an hour after i ate half a sandwich with only mustard and a peice of turkey. sooo i had to take medication and it still wasnt enough. finally i had to deliver for two reasons
      1. they were afraid he was already large
      2. i developed pre eclamsia.
      so i gave birth to a LARGE 6 ibs 2 oz baby at ONLY 34 weeks.
      he should have been between 4 and 5ibs at 34weeks so listen carefully and do not cheat the results could be worst then pricking your fingers 8 times a day (try doing that and then injecting yourself in the leg arm or lower tummy) it hurts

  20. QUESTION:
    can the weight loss be controlled in diabetes? how? what are the normal value for fastings and random blood su
    if a person’s blood sugar level is controlled with diet and exercise why has even then frequency of micturion? how can it be controlled?

    • ANSWER:
      Regular exercise can reduce the possibilties of weightloss in diabetes. normal value for fasting glucose is 70-110 mg/100 ml. and random value is upto 140 mg/100 ml.

  21. QUESTION:
    Lack of glucose control – blood sugar level swings?
    My relative has swings in glucose level. She takes a few cookies and her glucose level would shoot up to 200+. And then she goes for a walk, and her glucose level would go down to very low levels like 40. So now she is controlling her diet with moderate exercise to maintain normal levels. The swing is so large that she could not take insulin to control it. When it is taken, sometimes the level goes even lower. The doctors did some tests to confirm this diabetes problem but could not figure out what the real cause of the problem is. Please tell us what is the name of such problem, if any, and any suggestion for a cure.

    • ANSWER:
      What the heck is she eating cookies for. No wonder she can’t keep sugar on a even keel. To me she is a lost cause. I think she is caught up in a big case of DENIAL.
      Until she takes diabetes seriously she will have problems. when she goes hypoglycemic tHypoglycemia Symptoms
      Because epinephrine, one of the hormones that is activated by hypoglycemia, comes from the central nervous system, the majority of early symptoms of hypoglycemia are related to the nervous system.
      Common symptoms of hypoglycemia include the following:
      Trembling
      Clamminess
      Palpitations
      Anxiety
      Sweating
      Hunger

      Because the brain is deprived of glucose, a second set of symptoms follows:
      Difficulty in thinking
      Confusion
      Headache
      Seizures
      Coma
      Ultimately, death

      Eating every 4-6 hours is important to prevent hypoglycemia.
      Be adventurous and try something new to liven up your snacks between meals!
      Each of the following counts as one starch:

      One small apple, orange, peach, pear, nectarine, or tangerine
      Eight animal crackers
      Four medium fresh apricots or seven dried halves
      1/2 of a banana rolled with 2-tablespoons Grape Nuts cereal
      1 cup cubed cantaloupe
      Twelve Bing cherries
      Two chocolate mousse bars (Weight Watchers)
      1/2 cup chow mein noodles
      Two sugar-free fudgesicles
      Three gingersnaps
      36 Goldfish (adds 1 fat serving)
      Three graham crackers (2 1/2-inch square)
      1/2 low-fat granola bar
      15 grapes
      ½ cup fruit juice
      Five slices melba toast
      1 cup skim milk
      Three peanut butter sandwich crackers (adds 1 fat serving)
      Two small plums
      24 oyster crackers
      3 cups popcorn (popped by hot air, or low-fat microwave)
      1 slice of angel food cake
      1 sugar-free pudding snack cup
      Three dried pitted prunes
      15 fat-free potato or tortilla chips
      3/4 ounce pretzels
      2 tablespoons raisins
      Two rice cakes (4″ diameter)
      1 regular Jell-o snack cup
      Seven Ritz crackers (adds 1 fat serving)
      Six saltine crackers
      ½ cup canned fruit
      15 Teddy Grahams (adds 1 fat serving)
      Five reduced-fat Triscuits
      Six Vanilla Wafers (adds 1 fat serving)
      Six Waverly Wafers (adds 1 fat serving)
      12 Original Wheat Thins (adds 1 fat serving)
      13 Reduced-fat Wheat Thins (adds 1/2 fat serving)
      1 cup nonfat fruit-flavored yogurt (sweetened with sugar substitute)
      1/2 cup of sherbet or I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt or TCBY frozen yogurt
      ry to use chart below.
      Also if she walks for exercise , try Nordic walking. Much better than just plain walking. It uses 46% more energy than plain walking. Builds upper body at the same time.
      Good luck to your friend. And don’t forget most diabetics cheat on their food intake.
      TIN

  22. QUESTION:
    Ways to lower my blood sugar level?
    Is there maybe certain foods or anything I can eat?
    Or is there certain foods I should avoid?

    I am pregnant, and just failed a one hour glucose test. Because my blood sugar level was 161. So now I am trying to see if there is any way to get control of my blood sugar before I go back for a retest. Or at least see if my change in diet make any difference with my blood test results.

    I will be fasting before going for the glucose test.
    I am not going to do anything drastic. I just want to do a better job of choosing better foods for this pregnancy.

    • ANSWER:
      omg some of this advice is ridiculous!!! (apparently some people dont know how to handle diabetes).

      First off if you do indeed have diabetes no food will help you on the 3 hour glucose test because you will be fasting. Im saying this first hand because the night before i limited my carbs (yes carbs is what turns into sugar and affects your glucose levels) and it didnt make a difference i still failed the test.

      Being diabetic during pregnancy is not the end of world everything will be fine. Im saying this as if you already do have diabetes because 163 is high. It is supposed to be under 140. My one hour was 150. and my 3 hour glucose test came out a little bit worse because they load you up with more glucose than the first test.

      What will probably happen is they will refer you to a diabetes councelor and come up with a diet plan. They change your diet first before putting you on any medication because sometimes woman can control their diabetes by just a simple diet change. I have controlled it through the whole day but only have to take medication at night. You will be testing your blood roughly 4-8 times a day and your baby will also be monitored more closely. An ultrasound every 4 weeks is norm. to check the size of the baby and see the growth.

      My diet plan consists of 3 meals a day and 3 snacks a day.
      The meals are limited to 45 carbs per meal
      and 15-20 carbs per snack
      This all totals about 2000 calories a day give or take

      An example for breakfast is and egg sandwich with 2 eggs, with 2 slices of whole wheat bread and an apple with peanut butter.

      snack:yogurt and a handful of nuts

      Lunch:grilled chicken salad with vinigarette and a cup of rice

      snack: plum with a boiled egg

      Dinner: Hamburger patty with cheese on top, cup of rice or pasta, tomato wedges, and broccoli with little butter.

      Snack:half a grilled cheese sandwich and 1/2 cup of watermelon.

  23. QUESTION:
    Diabetes – When to test blood sugar level?
    I was recently diagnosed with diabetes (controlled through exercise and diet, no meds at this time). I’ve gone to a ton of websites and read literature on diabetes, but cannot find a straight answer about testing my blood sugar.

    For diabetics out there….
    When should I test?
    Should I test after fasting (say after sleeping) or before a meal?
    How soon after a meal should I test?
    How many times a day?

    Thanks for your help! :-)

    • ANSWER:
      Testing for Type 1′s and insulin using Type 2′s is a bit different from your case. Type 1′s need to regularly test to ensure their BG level is not in a dangerous range and adjust their insulin. They may test up to 12x a day is some cases. Type 1′s using an insulin pump usually test often. Most Type 1′s average about 6x per day if they use multiple daily injections.

      If you are a new Type 2, you may want to start on a regular plan just to see how your levels are fluctuating during the day. You aren’t on meds or insulin, so you don’t need to worry about low blood sugar. Your main goal is to make sure you are not running too high and are unaware of it.

      For the first few days, test in the a.m. (fasting), 2 hours after breakfast, before lunch, 2 hours after lunch, before supper, and you guessed it…2 hours after dinner. You may also want to throw in an evening pre-bed check or two.

      You want to see if your fasting (before eating) levels are in range at all meal times, and how your are doing after you eat.

      That way, you will know if you need medication, or just need to adjust your diet (eat less carbs at dinner, for example).

      If all is fairly well, and you are following a healthy diet and exercising, you can test randomly on different days to make sure you are staying in range. If not, call your doctor to see if you need medication.

  24. QUESTION:
    What food should I avoid as a diabetic, in order to keep my blood sugars down?
    I am a diabetic trying to control my bolld sugar levels with food and diet.

    • ANSWER:
      Stay away from potatoes and pastas. These are foods that have alot of starches in them and the starches turn to sugar. Also stay away from your candies and cakes and pies unless they are sugar free. Drink diet drinks. You are not going to be able to stay away from sugars all together, as some foods naturally have sugar in them. I hope this helps you.

  25. QUESTION:
    How do you manage a TypeII diabetic with hypertension and peripheral neuropathy, with no response2Carbamazepi?
    The Patient is a 60+ years old lady who was diagnosed to be suffering from Diabetes during a routine clinical examination at a followup session to her otherwise well controlled Hypertension >30years, she had been on Atenolol and Nifedipine. Currently she is on Atenolol and Nimodipine. A trial at Physiotherapy, simple analgesics excersize has not helped much. Her major complains now burn like pain in the feet with greater concentration at the heels. She is on oral hypoglycaemics plus diet modification her blood sugar levels are good bet 4-7mMol/L

    • ANSWER:
      For diabetic neuropathy as described, there are 2 main drugs:
      Neurontin and Lyrica. Lyrica is a newer drug related to neurontin, but with fewer side effects. I’m not sure how they work. Another option is Cymbalta. It is an antidepressant that also happens to help with pain, including diabetic neuropathy.

  26. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had elevated Blood Sugar level for the first Glucose test but then ended up not having …..?
    Gestational Diabetes??? Please only answer this if you have had experience with this. I don’t want to hear that I need to see a Dr. BECAUSE I already have, I am just a little anxious about what I am going to find out on Monday. SO I would love to hear your stories…as long as they aren’t going to freak me out too much!! LOL

    I have already taken an early OSS(glucose tolerance test) last WED> and my Glucose was elevated. So I have to take the full 3 hour test on Monday. I do have a family history of Diabetes Type 1 and Type2.. and I have had Low blood sugar in the past but now it is High.
    I realize that Most women can control their GD with diet and exercise…but My Aunt had it and we almost lost her and the baby… So I am just a little scared.
    Thanks for sharing your experiences…
    THANKS LADIES!!! I already feel much better.
    Yeah For the first test I didn’t eat anything after Midnight the night before..and I didn’t eat or drink anything before I drank the Glucola, even though they said I could . And it was still elevated. They didn’t tell me what it actually was, just that it was elelvated.
    But you all have made me feel tons better… just knowing there are so many of you that ended up NOT having Gestational D. Anyway, again THANKS SO MUCH!!

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you’re pretty nervous about this! I can only speak from personal experience, but I hope this helps. My one hour test was elevated, so I went back for the three hour test. I was very close to meeting the criteria for gestational diabetes, but luckily, my levels were considered in the normal range by a point or two. Still, my doctor recommended I keep an eye on my diet, which I tried to do. The worst part of the whole experience was the waiting around for three hours and being hungry when it was done. I’m not sure how it will be for you, but I did not get my results the same day. I don’t remember how long it took.

      I was lucky. And in the end, I was rewarded with a beautiful baby boy! I hope your three hour test goes well. And if you do have GD, I have hope that you’ll be able to manage it well. Good luck to you! Take a deep breath and try not to worry.

  27. QUESTION:
    How does fasting affect a blood sugar test?
    Hi, and thanks in advance

    I have been suffering from stocking and glove neuropathy for several weeks, and will be conferring with a neurologist. However, I am concerned in the meantime as I am sure you can understand. I am 27, and don’t drink ever. They gave me a simple blood sugar test, and I came in at 107 after eating just hours before hand. Does this rule out diabetes as a cause.

    I am literally praying for diabetes to be the cause. I know diabetes is serious, but I can work with that. It will make me take control of my diet, as I run 4 miles a day and still don’t lose weight due to my poor eating. I have two aunts with MS, and this is what I lose sleep over.

    It would seem to me that the fasting would only serve to lower a blood sugar level, but I am completely ignorant as to the physiology behind this disease. From everything I have read, diabetes is probably the least pernicious disease that could be causing these effects to someone of my age.

    Thank you so very much for your help.

    • ANSWER:

  28. QUESTION:
    I tested my blood sugar this morning, it was 113, am I a Diabetic?
    I’m 54, and I have not been feeling very well lately. I was thinking that it had to do with my hormones, since I have not been on any hormones of any kind and my hot flashes are getting worse. I had been researching bio-identical hormones and I already made an appointment with a doctor. Besides hot flashes I had been feeling a little tired, and I’m losing weight. I thought it was because I don’t eat much, just breakfast, a protein shake for lunch and a salad with fruits a veggies and chicken for dinner. I drink lots of water, so going to the bathroom with frequency, is normal to me.

    I have a tendency to not eat for many hours like yesterday, when I had breakfast around 9:30 am and no lunch until 5:00 pm, when I was so hungry that I went out and got spaghetti and meat balls; and then at night I only had chocolate ice cream :) (I know… this was bad!). This was unusual for me, I rarely eat pasta and ice cream at night, I was busy and I had no other food around, and I would not do it again, I promise. I do exercise at least 3 times a week.

    So, would this reading of 113 be due to the pasta and ice cream? or does it mean I am a diabetic already. Could I control it by keeping track of food intake and sugar levels during day? Could I manage my sugars with just diet and exercise? Do I have to go to a doctor and start taking medicine? Is there a natural way to fight this? Lots of questions, I know… but I’m confuse on what to do first, and before I go out and buy books and food, I wanted to see what you all think. Two other facts: both of my parents are diabetic and I do not have insurance. Thanks:)
    To gazeygoo: thank you for your answer. I am probably paranoic and with reason, as diabetes runs in all my family; That’s why, I had bought test kit and periodically I check my blood sugar, specially when I’m not feeling well. I took the reading first thing this morning, with my home test kit, before any food intake. I have never had this reading before, no matter what I ate. I hope you are right :) Thanks again!

    • ANSWER:
      Keep your weight down. If your over weight it can help you on your way to being a diabetic. A blood sugar of 113 is good. Cinnamon is good to lower blood sugar and vinegar is another. Dill pickles also are good for blood sugar as the have 0 carbs. When you are looking at the label pay close attention to the carbs. At times foods with 0 sugar can be high in carbs.

  29. QUESTION:
    gestational diabetes,do u have it?
    i was just diagnosed with gd but dont see the nutritionist until next week. i have a couple questions for those who have it or know A LOT about it. is it easy to control your blood sugar levels with diet,without having to use insulin? what kind of diet should i be on? do i have to eliminate ALL sugar such as yogurt,ice cream,smoothies,cake etc.? did your baby develop jaundice because of the diabetes?and lastly,did your diabetes go away after the birth? thanks for all questions answered =)

    • ANSWER:
      depending on hoe reactive your system is to sugars will make the differance – MOST GD is controlable with diet. breakfast was my most difficult to keep in range but i wasn’t overly nurotic about it as my best friend is diabetic and i know that even during pregnancy – not to let the Dr’s scare your too bad about “mild” overages …
      Try to find “Blue Bunny” yogurt products – they have a low carb line that is great – they have frozen yogurt bars and also a smoothie drink. Chicken, beef, fish ( mind what you eat due to mercery) and many fresh vegies are great for snacks. – ice cream & cake – umm not totally out of the question BUT… it will make your sugar go up – and leave very little for other carbs/sugars for that meal…
      Also stay away from aserpitame (sp?) not good for you or baby – the only artificial sweetner that is OK during pregnancy is Splenda. I OK’d it with my OBGYN and looke dit up on line too….

      As far as the baby – she was fine – 19 1/2 inches and 7lbs 4 oz. Delivered normally…. and even if your child did develop jayndice – they put them under special lights in the incubator and it works it’s self out.

      You will go back to not having diabetes as soon as you have the baby as the GD is a direct result of you being pregnant – How soon you ask – I asked the same question – Right away…

      With my breakfast #’s the endocrendonigist they had me seeing was pushing me towards insulen. I said no… but remember it was really only my breakfast #’s that went nuts. and they weren’t WAY OUT THERE…..

      Salads are great for you – and although i know the though of “rabbit food” might not tempt you remember grilled chicken or steak on top do wonders for a salad. Also it’s summer – and it’s all fresh
      Also it’s only for a few months at this point – so the grrrrr of it all will be worth it.
      Feel free to e-mail of you have any specific questions
      flirt762@yahoo.com – just be sure to list in the subject line ABOUT YOUR ANSWER IN QUESTIONS so i dont just delete it.

  30. QUESTION:
    This is from the American Diabetic Association?
    I’m more interested in how “Lisa”, patient mentioned in article was not testing correctly as stated by her doctor, any thoughts on this?

    _____________________________________________

    How can your A1C test results help your control? Here are two examples.

    Bob D., 49 years old, has type 2 diabetes. For the past seven years, he and his doctor have worked to control his blood sugar levels with diet and diabetes pills. Recently, Bob’s control has been getting worse. His doctor said that Bob might have to start insulin shots. But first, they agreed that Bob would try an exercise program to improve control.

    That was three months ago. Bob stuck to his exercise plan. Last week, when the doctor checked Bob’s blood sugar, it was near the normal range. But the doctor knew a single blood test only showed Bob’s control at that time. It didn’t say much about Bob’s overall blood sugar control.

    The doctor sent a sample of Bob’s blood to the lab for an A1C test. The test results would tell how well Bob’s blood sugar had been controlled, on average, for the past few months. The A1C test showed that Bob’s control had improved. With the A1C results, Bob and the doctor had proof that the exercise program was working. The test results also helped Bob know that he could make a difference in his blood sugar control.

    The A1C test can also help someone with type 1 diabetes. Nine-year-old Lisa J. and her parents were proud that she could do her own insulin shots and urine tests. Her doctor advised her to begin a routine of two shots a day and to check her blood sugar as well.

    Lisa kept records of all her test results. Most were close to the ideal range. But at her next checkup, the doctor checked her blood and found her blood sugar level was high. The doctor sent a sample of Lisa’s blood for an A1C test. The results showed that Lisa’s blood glucose control had in fact been poor for the last few months.

    Lisa’s doctor asked Lisa to do a blood sugar check. To the doctor’s surprise, Lisa turned on the timer of her meter before pricking her finger and putting the blood drop on the test strip. The doctor explained to Lisa and her parents that the way Lisa was testing was probably causing the blood sugar test errors.

    With time and more accurate blood sugar results, Lisa and her parents got better at using her results to keep food, insulin, and exercise in balance. At later checkups, her blood sugar records and the A1C test results showed good news about her control.

    A1C tests can help:
    Here’s an update from the original article:

    http://www.everydayhealth.com/publicsite/news/view.aspx?id=627833&xid=nl_EverydayHealthManagingDiabetes_20090609

    • ANSWER:
      Annie….I really liked the information you have provided here about the importance of the A1C test, but remember this, tests are fallible to a degree. They are “Instrumental” at best. The only other problem here is, you lead the reader to think that maybe you are comparing the two scenarios, which after thinking about it, I am hoping that is NOT the case.
      Think of the A1C as the reflection of “Work Done” as a diabetic. In other words see that the A1C shows the effort the patient has expended in terms of exercise, in the elimination of excess static sugars in the blood. Having said that, exercise for patients of Type I and Type II are equally beneficial.
      It is equally beneficial to understand that the insulan production of a type I is usually too little or non-existant, hence the reliance on Insulin replacement therapy. So then the question is, how much exercise in comparison to static blood sugar and insulin infusion. There in lies the problem with type I’s, concerning hypoglycemia or insulin shock. It is truly a difficult prospect to encure and then alleviate or at best manage. Unfortuneately, this then requires a higher level of “Proper Testing Protocol” throughout the day, everyday. Not just in terms of the pain issue, but in the term of the mundane routine. Typically, stellar adherence to proper protocol in testing is not within the grasp of most 9 year olds, again, I say in “most” 9 year olds. This then, becomes the weak link. And “Balance is then crucial”.

      I pray that the child Lisa does well, the future for her will depend on her adherance now. I am sure that you see the effects of Type I diabetes far outways those of the Type II, only in that of the differance of age.

  31. QUESTION:
    How many weeks is normal for delivery with gestational diabetes?
    I am 33 weeks along with gestational diabetes. I have been doing very well with my blood sugar levels and my diabetes is controlled by diet.

    Is it likely that my doctor will let me carry to 40 weeks?

    • ANSWER:
      They will put pressure on you to induce early. I’m a type 2 diabetic and went 40 weeks + 1 day for my first pregnancy, and my daughter was 7 1/2 pounds. It’s not always medically necessary but a lot of doctors nowadays seem to push diabetic moms into early induction.

  32. QUESTION:
    I am Diabetic (Type 2) and i am getting thinner day by day? Please help and guide.?
    Hello, My name is Alima. I am 52 Years old. My height is 4 feet 10 inches and my weight is 42 kg. That makes my Body Mass Index (BMI) = 19.44. I was diagnosed with Diabetes (type 2) in 2004. Since then i am trying to control my diabetes. I have controlled it well. But the problem is that i am weak as you can guess from my BMI. Bones are visible on my face. There is very less flesh on my hands. An skin is so thin. Please anyone guide me how can i gain weight without increasing my blood sugar levels. Any diets?
    PLEASE NOTE THAT I CAN VERY WELL CONTROL MY DIABETES WITHOUT USE OF MEDICINE. DOCTORS SUGGEST THAT TOO. Its just that i have no guidance on proper diet that can increase weight without increasing blood sugar levels. Please guide.

    • ANSWER:

  33. QUESTION:
    33 weeks pregnant with high sugar/glucose level?
    HI, Im 33 weeks pregnant. During my 24th week the glucose tolerance test was negative. But the recent test showed my fasting blood sugar level to be 101 and PP BS to be 114. The Doctor has asked me to constantly monitor the blood sugar levels at home, 8 times a day..phew..and as well control on diet and exercises. What are the normal blood sugar levels during pregnancy. I have a history of PC OS and as well my mother is a diabetic. does this mean even I’m a diabetic now and what are the proposed risks to my unborn child?

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor should tell you what’s normal. But I know while I was pregnant (I lost the baby at 22 weeks due to complications that had nothing to do with being a diabetic, even though I’ve been a type 1 for 24 years.) my obgyn and my endo told me my blood sugars should be between 75-80 fasting and 90-100 after eating. Aks your doctor though. He/she should be able to tell you what you should be aiming for. Especially if you’re testing that many times a day. Your doctor can also do tests to check of diabetes now, he or she may even want to run another glucose tolerance test. They can also tell you any risks to your baby. You’re pretty far along, and I’m sure you’ve had all the pre natal test done to check for anything that may be wrong with your baby, but just to be on the safe side, have your doctor fill you in on all the questions you asked here. That’s what they get paid the big bucks for. :) Good luck with your little one.

  34. QUESTION:
    Where do I look to get in shape as a skinny type 2 diabetic?
    I’m roughly 150 pounds at 5′ 11″ and have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 4 months ago, like a few others in my family. I see articles out there and books on how to lose weight to fight type II diabetes, but I’m skinny! While I get out and walk a lot, I’m interested in hitting the gym to increase my quality of life. Where do I start? Any good book recommendations?

    I’m working with a doctor and have taken control of blood sugar levels and diet. Now I just need to get the fitness plan going. I’ve read that weight training can be beneficial. Any thoughts? I’m guessing my carbohydrate intake would increase as well?

    I look forward to your feedback. :)

    • ANSWER:
      Definitely a good thing that you’re interested in your health! Well since you’re thinking about hitting the gym anyway, consider asking what they provide as far as personal trainers. Most fitness centers have them, and it can get somewhat expensive — but if you invest in time with a personal trainer for just, say, two months, they might provide you with invaluable information about what you need to do. They’ll teach you how to use all the equipment, and as they’re certified, can give you accurate advice about fitness. Definitely be sure to share the fact that you have type II diabetes and you’re doing this for your personal health; that’ll definitely help in tailoring a workout regime that’s right for you.

      On a side-note — while I don’t know how it relates specifically to type II diabetes, weight training is always beneficial, though it’s often stuff that people neglect! That will also be something your personal trainer can help work out with you, especially if you’re skinny and even considering bulking up a little bit.

      As always, be sure to mention all of this to your doctor, too. They can also recommend a certain amount of protein and carb intake, or even recommend that you see a nutritionist who can help you discover the correct dietary steps for an active person with type II diabetes.

      While books and stuff are amazing resources at times, I think a more personal and hands-on approach will give you faster and more specified results. ;)

      Good luck. :)

  35. QUESTION:
    What effects will high blood sugar have on my unborn child?
    I’m diabetic & recently found out I’m pregnant. I’m currently 8 weeks. My blood sugar had been out of control (mostly in the 200s) but as soon as I found out-at 5 weeks-I changed my diet & have since got it mostly under control (average is between 100-130. I have caught it at 200 twice in the last several weeks & am really concerned what damage may have been done with my high blood glucose levels before I found out & since I found out. I’ve searched & searched the web but have found no real answers to my question. Can anyone tell me, what are the chances my baby will have a major defect because of my high blood sugar? Please, no vague answers. I’ve read enough of that in my search for some answers. Furthermore, if you have anything ugly to say please don’t waste your time & please spend your time on the internet somewhere else. Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      My sister was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 8 weeks with levels at 190 + and was put on a diet and exercise by her OBGYN after testing with a followup to a dietician for meal plans. She also had a glucose meter and her #’s were high at times, even with her stringent diet and exercise, so she finally had to go on insulin injections after about 3 weeks. She had problems due to her fear of needles and her anxious state about having diabetes but she overcome this for her baby. After her OBGYN put her on insulin she was able to stabilize her insulin levels and her doctor assured her there should be no damage to the baby due to their quick response to her high blood glucose levels and her treatment plan.

      Check with your OBGYN and talk to him/her about your concerns and your high levels at time so the doctor can address this medical problem. My sister also researched and found alot of answers by asking not only professionals but friends who had also gone through this condition. The pregnancy went well with some few problems such as morning sickness, feeling weak, keeping weight gain in check, insulin injections that frustrated her at times, but overall it was worth it since her baby was born a healthy boy with no problems. So, informing yourself, talking to your doctor about your concerns, taking insulin if needed or oral meds if you can, it is all worth it for your healthy baby and for you and the baby’s future.

      You’ll need to keep diligent track of your glucose levels, using a home glucose meter or strips. To keep those levels where they should be, you’ll want to:

      Eat a well-planned diet. The American Diabetes Association recommends getting nutritional counseling from a registered dietitian who’ll help you develop specific meal and snack plans based on your height, weight, and activity level.
      Your diet must have the correct balance of protein, fats, and carbohydrates, while providing the proper vitamins, minerals, and calories. To keep your glucose levels stable, it’s particularly important that you don’t skip meals, especially breakfast, and that you avoid sugary items like candy, cookies, cakes, and soda.
      This may sound daunting, but it’s not so hard once you get the hang of it. And don’t think of yourself as being on a special or restrictive diet. The principles of the diabetic diet are good ones for everyone to follow. Think of this as an opportunity to create healthier eating habits for yourself and your whole family. If everyone in the house is eating the same foods, you won’t feel as deprived.
      Exercise. Studies show that moderate exercise also helps improve your body’s ability to process glucose, keeping blood sugar levels in check. Many women with gestational diabetes benefit from 30 minutes of aerobic activity, such as walking or swimming, each day. Ask your practitioner what level of physical activity would be beneficial for you.
      Take insulin if necessary. If you’re not able to control your blood sugar well enough with diet and exercise alone, your provider will prescribe insulin shots for you to give yourself as well. About 15 percent of women with gestational diabetes need insulin. Recently, some practitioners have been prescribing oral medications instead of injections for some cases of gestational diabetes.

      Hope this helps.

  36. QUESTION:
    Gestational Diabetes Question?
    Hello. At 20 weeks pregnant I have been tested early for GD and I do in fact have it. We tried controlling my blood glucose levels with diet & exercise, but my fasting blood sugar levels were still high, so I was put on 10 units of Insulin at night before I go to bed. Well after 3 nights and 3 mornings, my fasting blood sugar has been great (71-88). I am now finding though that my levels during the day are high. Why? I was doing really well during the day before the insulin. Now I’m afraid they’re going to make me take shots before every meal. Am I doing something to make my levels during the day high? I’m eating healthy. For example tonight I had grilled chicken, grilled asparagus & less than 1/2 cup of corn and my blood sugar was at 153 and hour later, wtf? I didn’t even have the amount of carbs I’m allowed to have. I’m feeling really frustrated and I can’t find any info on having to take shots before meals being pregnant so I’m hoping and praying someone out there can shine a light on this issue of mine. Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:

  37. QUESTION:
    I am a diabetic and control my condition with diet and exercise.?
    I have been doing this for last ten years. However, my fasting blood sugar level now ranges between 125 to 130. Strangly, after dinner it does not go over 150. The fasting level used to come down to 100-105 level before. I have not changed anything I know off. Can any body suggest why it does not go down at fasting test time.

    • ANSWER:
      I found an interesting book that has helped me tremendously. Did you know that daily cinammon consumption helps with not only blood sugar control, but lowers cholesterol and triglycerides?

      I’ve put together an informative little webpage with all sorts of help for diabetics here:

      http://www.geocities.com/seabulls69/Type_II_Diabetes.html

  38. QUESTION:
    Can you guys sign a petition for diabetes research on the effectiveness of a low-carb diet?
    Can you guys sign this?

    Here’s the petition:

    http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/get-the-nih-to-acknowledge-the-existing-science-and-fund-more-research-by-the-experts-who-have

    Copy of the petition:

    “Target:People with Diabetes & People Who Know People With DiabetesSponsored by: Lauri Cagnassola

    National Institutes of Health re: the ACCORD Diabetes Study: “Intensively targeting blood sugar to near-normal levels … increases risk of death. ”

    This statement is untrue. This study lowered blood glucose levels only by aggressive drug treatment.

    Preventative measures and proven non-drug treatments are being ignored by the NIH, ADA and many other governing agencies.

    There is abundant scientific evidence proving a carbohydrate restricted diet can be as effective as drugs in lowering blood glucose levels safely. Many times diet is more effective than medication in controlling diabetes – all without side effects or increased risk of death.

    I ask that the National Institutes of Health publically retract the above quoted statement. It is misleading the public.

    I also request that the NIH acknowledge the existing science and fund more research by the experts who have experience with carbohydrate restriction as a means of treatment for diabetes.

    For more info, or to help people with diabetes, please e-mail info@nmsociety.org .

    Thank you.”

    Please go to the link to sign it:

    http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/get-the-nih-to-acknowledge-the-existing-science-and-fund-more-research-by-the-experts-who-have

    You can click the option not to display your name – it just comes out as anonymous with your state.

    You can also read the comments from other people with diabetes who signed.

    I think it’s important.

    • ANSWER:
      The problem with signing petitions like this is that it doesn’t change the outcome of the study. The ACCORD study did indeed show that one particular aggressive treatment regimen on a group of high risk diabetics increased the risk of death compared with more standard therapies. As the study researchers themselves admit, the study’s conclusions might not apply to other treatment methods or for diabetics with fewer complications.

      “ACCORD is providing important evidence to help guide treatment recommendations for adults with established type 2 diabetes who have had a heart attack or stroke or who have two or more risk factors for cardiovascular disease in addition to diabetes,” said NHLBI Director Elizabeth G. Nabel, M.D. “For these individuals, intensively lowering blood sugar to near-normal levels appears to be too risky.”

      “The researchers caution that the results might not apply to patients who are at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than the ACCORD participants or to patients with more recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes. On average, ACCORD participants had been diagnosed with diabetes for 10 years at enrollment.

  39. QUESTION:
    whats happening to my blood glucose levels?
    Hi I am 25 years old, female and i’m 13.5 stones. In April this year I was diagnosed with type 2 diabeties. I went through a very bad time, I get very anxious with any sort of medical appointment, and the month I was diagnosed, every day I had some sort of letter through the post telling me about this appointment and that appointment. I decided to fill in a form to say I did not want to attend the appointments and didnt want any mail regarding it. I am just diet controlled so I cut out all sugars, lowered my carbs and for about 3 months I managed to control my blood glucose very well. I lost 6 stones in 5.5 months and joined a gym. I felt like a new person. I tested my blood sugars using a blood sugar monitor about 5 or 6 times a day to ensure I was in control. (very expensive)!

    Suddenly, my blood sugars went from 4.6ish waking and 2hrs after meals (which is where it was since after diagnosis), to the mid 5′s mmol, then the next week the mid 6′s, then the mid 8′s, then 10mmol and so on and so on, and now it’s at the mid 16mmol with a reading of 17.9 on return from work today.

    These rises have happened in a matter of 2 months and where I thought, perhaps i’m coming down with something, i havn’t and they continue to rise. I tested my urine for ketones just now and it is showing a very dark purple (I assume that means I have ketones in my urine). I’ve been feeling okish, a little vague and weak on some days, I just generally feel lazy. Nothing has changed, I’ve been eating the same foods, doing the same excercise etc.

    I’ve got an appointment booked with my doctor tomorrow which i’m scared about, i think he will be happy with my weight loss, but im so concerned now about my blood sugars. any ideas on what my body is playing at and what my doctor may suggest? thanks for reading.

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, I salute you for taking proactive steps to control your diabetes. You have done everything ‘right’ and the proof of that is your good blood sugar control initially.

      Unfortunately though, diabetes is a progressive disease and no matter what one does, sometimes, one can’t fight against it. It’s like somebody diagnosed with myopia, another progressive disease. Myopia often gets worse over the years no matter what the person does or doesn’t do (eat more carrots, only read in well-lit areas etc). It sounds like that’s what is happening with your diabetes.

      There is also another possible explanation and that is that you have been misdiagnosed and actually have Type 1 diabetes. The difference is as follows: In Type 2, the person still makes insulin, but their body does not respond to it well. Low carb/diet/exercise can improve insulin sensitivity and thus blood sugar levels can be controlled.

      In Type 1, the person’s body attacks itself, and they do not produce any insulin anymore. No amount of diet/exercise is going to help. They have to inject insulin to survive.

      While diabetes is progressive, the type of rises in blood sugar that you describe are just too rapid and too severe. It really sounds to me as if you might actually have Type 1. Many people, including many in the medical profession, think that only children get Type 1. But people can get Type 1 at any age. I got it at age 38, and I know a few people who got it in their 50s.

      So when you see the doctor, please ask to be tested for Type 1. Ask to be tested for antibodies. Also ask for a C-peptide test. This measures how much insulin your body is making. Type 1s make very little or no insulin while Type 2s make normal/large amounts of insulin.

      Good luck. I hope this gets sorted out soon.

  40. QUESTION:
    How important is the Diabetic diet?
    Hiya,

    I have been going out with my diabetic (type 1) bf for over a year. Everything I have read about it seems to suggest that people with diabetes should be on special, healthy diets etc.

    He doesn’t follow any special diet at all. He eats pizza,etc /drinks occasionally- often not on the diet shown for diabetics. And we both eat loads of sweets and biscuits.

    He says he can eat what he wants providing he takes the right amount of insulin.

    I went to hospital with him and they said his sugar control is very good – he seems to be able to tell, though he almost never checks his blood sugar levels.

    I love him so much and although his diabetes affects him, other peoples lifestyles seem to be more affected by it. I was wondering why the strict diet for diabetics? Is there anything wrong with what he does? Can other people with diabetes share their experience or tell me why some people see the diet as so important?

    • ANSWER:
      Your Bf is correct.You treat for the carbs you eat.
      It would be best if he did check his sugar more often so he is sure of what he is dealing with .

      We are allowed to make poor nutritional choices like everyone else.

  41. QUESTION:
    With type 2 diabetic with drug blood sugar some time remains control some time it goes high?
    I am taking Melmet 1000 both morning and night some time it remain control some time it does not. Though I do regular exercise. I do show doctror regularly and do all types of test related to diabetic. Initially I was treated with insulin 30/70 still the problem remained when it was changed to Melmet 1000 sugar level mostly remain controlled but some time with same exercise and diet control became high to 350mg/dl. I do check of my sugar level very frequently at home with my own instrument.

    • ANSWER:
      Sometimes crazy things just happen. Who knows why? But as long as you keep your glucose levels at a reasonable level, <140 mg/dl, for the vast majority of the time you'll be okay.

      Having said that you are correct to be concerned about those 350 readings. If you are testing 3 to 4 times (or more) per day you and your doctor might be able to see a pattern and adjust your medication or insulin. That assumes you're keeping records.

      maybe you should consider using one of the long lasting basal insulin analogs like Lantus? But the only problem with that is Lantus is very expensive.

      Work with your doctor and you'll get it sorted out.

  42. QUESTION:
    Need more answers — GD — some ladies who had it?
    I have been measuring my blood sugar levels before my diet .. and they really aren’t as bad as I thought, most of them are within the range the doctor wants them at. But I am starting my diet tomorrow, and the official blood monitoring as well. I am so scared. I am 30 weeks pregnant exactly and about 235 pounds, so yes, “obese” as it seems. I plan on going for at least three 30 minute walks a week. I am scared of GD harming the baby and I, and having high blood pressure, preeclampsia, having a stillborn, etc. I need some stories from ladies out there like me who had a successful birth because I need some reassurance just to feel better.

    Just so you all know — I didn’t put off starting my diet or anything — my doctor’s office never called to tell me I was diagnosed with GD, I had to call a bunch of times to get my test results. I got the results on Wednesday, have been monitoring since yesterday, and saw a dietitian this morning to start my diet tomorrow.

    So as long as you control your blood glucose levels to what your doctor says then it’s like you don’t have it? (I mean of course you have it, have to follow the diet & everything but health-wise, if you follow it right & everything stays in check, is everything okay?) I AM SO SCARED! :( I’m such a worrywart. I’m scared of my baby being a stillborn .. being too big .. me getting preeclampsia .. I don’t know what to do with myself!

    • ANSWER:
      Hey Nina, try not to stress so much. It is true that if you keep your sugars down it’s like you don’t have it. The reason they set up those fasting/post-prandial targets is because that’s what they would measure in a non-diabetic pregnant woman.

      So I’m a diabetic all the time, not just during pregnancy, and I’m on my second pregnancy. By keeping my blood sugars under control I had a completely healthy pregnancy with normal vaginal delivery. I didn’t even need an epidural. My baby’s blood sugar was taken at birth and her level was normal as well. She was a 7-pounder. So what I’m trying to say is that I had those blood sugar concerns from day 1 of the pregnancy and had none of the complications you hear about because I kept my sugars under control the entire time.

      But do try to relax because stress raises your blood sugar – just what we all need to hear….it really will be okay. GD is very, very common and millions of women deal with it every day.

  43. QUESTION:
    Can I join the National Guard with out them finding out I’m a diabetic? If so how? Do i simply not tell them?
    I want very badly to join the National Guard, I love the ideal of giving my life to help people in need I have always wanted to join but I had other obligations problem is I’m now a diabetic. It is completely controlled with a low sugar diet and exerises , which i will get plenty of at boot camp. Can i simply go to the physical with a normal blood sugar level and them not be able to detect it. If not then how? please help

    • ANSWER:
      you cannot tell them they will find out but ask them sometimes they will let them in i think i know regualar army, air force won’t but maybe you can with them check it out and ask its like physical always anyhow and they woudl knw.

  44. QUESTION:
    Have you had success with controlling Feline Diabetes with Wellness canned food?
    I’ve been feeding Wellness dry and my cats have done really good with it thier health has improved except for one cat who is on prednisolone which can contribute to elevated blood sugar. He is not likely to do better off of the medicine. The vet suggested switching to Purina DM or Friskies Beef flavor because they are lower in carbs. I have read the Wellness canned has 3% carbs versus 10% in the other foods suggested. I am not thrilled about feeding my cat foods from companies involved in the previous pet food recall. I don’t believe they are going to take anymore care in making food than before. The cost is nearly the same but the difference is Wellness is organic human grade food. I have seen some things on the internet from various pet owners that they’ve put thier cats on this with success have any of you had any luck with this. The goal would be to change the blood sugar level with out starting the cat on insulin by feeding a high protein diet.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Sophia…Wellness is an excellent dietary source for cats in general regardless of health. However, cats who have been diagnosed with feline diabetes require insulin to adjust for increased or decreased blood sugar. In cats with diabetes their pancreas no longer produces insulin so blood sugar will fluctuate too high or too low depending on their activity level, emotional level as well as how much and when they eat. The disease itself isn’t so clear cut as it differs from one cat to another so it is quite complicated to simplify this all within my answer to you.

      Here is a wonderfully well written website on feline diabetes that I hope you will find very helpful to learn how to manage the disease for your cat: http://felinediabetes.com/diabetes-info.htm

  45. QUESTION:
    Babies born with low blood sugar?
    I am 38 weeks and 1 day pregnant. I am having a scheduled c section on september 2nd due to the fact that my daughter is breech and is expected to weigh 9 lbs. I do have gestational diabetes. I’m a bit worried about her having low blood sugar after birth. My diabetes is diet controlled, but there have been times where my levels have been a bit high. They’ve been running in the 120s to 130s today, which isn’t horrible, but I’m not to exceed 120. Will this cause her to have low blood sugar at birth? How easily is it brought back up and managed? Does that always work? The rest of the week I will make sure my levels are staying down until I have her on Friday. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  46. QUESTION:
    does not eating for 16 hours raise or lower blood sugar?
    borderline diabetic. doc gave me an accucheck meter to monitor and control sugar through diet and life style changes.
    i will see the doc again this friday and discuss my results with him.
    doc has been using blood tests from the lab and an accu check in his office to monitor me several times a year, always close, but never into the diabetic range.

    my level all day stays below 140.
    fasting is out of control. first thing in the morning im averaging 120.
    “Dawn Phenomenon” was suggested in another question, which i wil discus with the doc.

    as an experiment, i did not eat anything for 16 hours. reading was 128.

    can not eating push it up that high?

    should i try several small meals through the day?

    or is my something wrong? have i become a diabetic over night and i cant control this anymore? should i call the doc on monday?

    thanks everyone, this is new to me and im just not sure when it becomes critical and i should worry.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, not eating can raise your blood sugar and it can be dangerous to some people.
      Your eating habits should be consistent. Eat breakfast,a mid morning snack,lunch,afternoon snack, supper and an evening snack.This could be too much for you to do but diabetes is a trial and error disease but not too much error.Monitor your blood whenever your not sure.It’s better to be safe than sorry.Best of health to you!!! Take Care!

  47. QUESTION:
    Is any of this true about how good bananas are??
    Never, put your banana in the refrigerator!!!
    This is interesting.
    After reading this, you’ll never look at a banana in the same way again.

    Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy.
    Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes.
    But energy isn’t the only way a banana can help us keep fit.
    It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

    Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.
    PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

    Anemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.
    Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

    Brain Power: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.
    Constipation: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.
    Hangovers: One of the quickest
    ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.
    Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

    Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.
    Mosquito bites: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.
    Nerves: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.

    Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at wor k leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.
    Ulcers: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.
    Temperature control: Many other cultures see bananas as a “cooling” fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.

    Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.
    Smoking &Tobacco Use: Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.
    Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.
    Strokes: According to research in The New England Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!
    Warts: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, “A banana a day keeps the doctor away!”
    PASS IT ON TO YOUR FRIENDS
    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time! I will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe…polish with dry cloth. Amazing fruit !

    • ANSWER:
      i shall start eating a banana a day from tomorrow

  48. QUESTION:
    Pcos which is best?
    if i have pcos and knowing that it can be controlled and made better through diet control,regarding weight loss i know that the GI diet and having low sugar or sutting out refined carbs is advised,but in regards to the wight loss could i still just eat low fat sugar diet and less calories and lose weight? All my friends who have lost weight have just eaten less,i was thinking of eating little and often and not follow what my friend did,as she has been very stressed as she is going through case with social services with her children at mo,so she has just had reduced appetite,and also wanted to lose weight,she was sometimes only having breakfast and then just having a eve meal,or no breakfast at all and eat maybe the odd thing otherwise just eating one meal in the eve,admitidly she lost weight and looks good,but not sure how healthy this is to do,plus i know i could not go all day without food,think this would also be cause of my blood sugar levels and insulin probs due to the pcos
    But is this true even if you are not gaining anymore weight,that i still deserve more help from GP? he has briefly mentioned metformin/not sure what other medicine in uk is equivalent to this or other types,but we do have metformin,my weight is because i also eat badly well over lifetime,not exercised enough,but also cause the effect the pcos has on my body,and problems it causes,also makes weight loss harder,plus i have bad skin,of which he has tried me on a pill i’ve already had before a year ago.i was just taking it then for contraceptive reasons,and we didn’t know i had pcos then. He says it may help with the hormone inbalance?! But am scared about weight gain and acne getting worse as the pill can do this,but have only got 3mth trial then going back to him. In line with taking something for insulin probs and to help weightloss,what else would they implement with this? Eg diet/other advise or necessary things to do whilst taking met or other

    • ANSWER:
      you should be getting more help than this, i was prescribed metformin and orlistat and lost 4 stones. my gynacologist said that because of the pcos i had more insulin in my body than a bodybuilder would use to bulk up!!
      see your doctor and say auntie rachel said, help me more.
      as you probably know all about the condition one of the problems is carb cravings. if someone’s trying to give up smoking they are prescribed nrt thus for our condition we should receive equivalent support.

  49. QUESTION:
    Why is my FBS fluctuating. with exercise, strict diet control for two days it becomes 80. No exercise 135 etc?
    Two and half months before I made a routine check up and my fast blood sugar level became 176. My BP was 160/110. I reduced weight drastically i.e 11 KGs and it is now consistently 120/80. I took BP tablets for 8 days and stopped it by Doc advice. A re-check of FBS the next day, it became 165. I had another one on the 5th day and it became144. The Doc said, “you can control this by diet”. I started taking diabetic diet and it is now consistently below 95. And yet I am disturbed for I am not sure whether or not I am a diabetic. Am I diabetic? If I am a diabetic, how could it go so low within a week time? It had even gone as low as 59 and 60 in two of the tests. It was 95 only once and I had eaten pizza the previous night. Is it a pre-diabetes or a diabetes case? Is it wise to start taking medicine at present? should I consult more than one Docs? I am at a loss. It could be of some interest for you to know my brother died of diabetes melitius at the age of 34. I am 54 yr old.
    Yes, my Blood type is O+. It seems a very interesting twist. Now I have totally avoided all sweets, sugar, cake etc. I have avoided white bread. I do exercise 20-30 minutes a day, only walking. Last Wednesday FBS was 83, friday 135, Saturday 109. It is very confusing. Anytime I do walk for 30 minutes it goes down immediately. If I eat my dinner early, it goes down in the morning. I have no so far any of diabetes common symptom. NO EXCESS THIRST, NO HUNGER, NO FATIGUE OR FEELING TIRED, NO FREQUENT VISIT OF THE REST ROOM i.e frequent urine. NO SUCH THINGS. I don’t have any of the commonly known symptoms of diabetes. I stopped smoking some 10 months before after smoking for well over 25 years. I stopped taking beer for the last four months. I used to take a couple of beers every night after dinner. I totally stopped it now.

    • ANSWER:
      I bet you’re Blood Group O! I’m not really just kidding: O’s thrive on exercise, and maybe you need to be active to stay healthy.

      Your blood sugar (are you always talking FASTING blood sugar levels??) I’m not sure whether you made a typo when you said you took blood PRESSURE pills and your blood SUGAR dropped, or whether you mean you took pills for the blood glucose.

      As far as I know fasting BS should not be higher than about 99. BUT there is a thing called the Dawn Phenomenon, where some people’s BS is too high in the morning.

      If your doc doesn’t seem to know what to do with you, you need to see an endocrinologist — a specialist chap who will know what tests to do.

      To me you sound as if you are not a true diabetic, maybe pre-diabetic — in which case you can forestall diabetes by controlling your diet NOW and maybe take a low-dose pill like Glucophage/Metformin.

      Your brother, at that age, would have had Type 1, which differs considerably from Type 2 …

      Take your BS 1 hr after every meal, then again in an hour’s time. It will peak in 1 hr and should come down in 2 hrs but maybe not all the way down.

      Normal levels (non-diabetic) tend to stay within 72 – 126, and could go as high as 144 1 hr after a big meal. As far as I am aware that is normal — no higher.

      It sounds like you need a more savvy doc, or ask to be referred to an endocrinologist.

  50. QUESTION:
    I am insulin resistance – a side effect of PCOS – anyone have any good recomendations for suitible diet?
    Definition
    Insulin resistance is not a disease as such but rather a state or condition in which a person’s body tissues have a lowered level of response to insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that helps to regulate the level of glucose (sugar) in the body. As a result, the person’s body produces larger quantities of insulin to maintain normal levels of glucose in the blood. There is considerable individual variation in sensitivity to insulin within the general population, with the most insulin-sensitive persons being as much as six times as sensitive to the hormone as those identified as most resistant. Some doctors use an arbitrary number, defining insulin resistance as a need for 200 or more units of insulin per day to control blood sugar levels. Various researchers have estimated that 3-16 percent of the general population in the United States and Canada is insulin-resistant; another figure that is sometimes given is 70-80 million Americans.
    Insulin resistance can be thought of as a set of metabolic dysfunctions associated with or contributing to a range of serious health problems. These disorders include type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes), the metabolic syndrome (formerly known as syndrome X), obesity, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Some doctors prefer the term “insulin resistance syndrome” to “metabolic syndrome.”
    Description
    To understand insulin resistance, it may be helpful for the reader to have a brief account of the way insulin works in the body. After a person eats a meal, digestive juices in the small intestine break down starch or complex sugars in the food into glucose, a simple sugar. The glucose then passes into the bloodstream. When the concentration of glucose in the blood reaches a certain point, the pancreas is stimulated to release insulin into the blood. As the insulin reaches cells in muscle and fatty (adipose) tissues, it attaches itself to molecules called insulin receptors on the surface of the cells. The activation of the insulin receptors sets in motion a series of complex biochemical signals within the cells that allow the cells to take in the glucose and convert it to energy. If the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin or the insulin receptors do not function properly, the cells cannot take in the glucose and the level of glucose in the blood remains high.
    The insulin may fail to bind to the insulin receptors for any of several reasons. Some persons inherit a gene mutation that leads to the production of a defective form of insulin that cannot bind normally to the insulin receptor. Others may have one of two types of abnormalities in the insulin receptors themselves. In type A, the insulin receptor is missing from the cell surface or does not function properly. In type B, the person’s immune system produces autoantibodies to the insulin receptor.
    In the early stages of insulin resistance, the pancreas steps up its production of insulin in order to control the increased levels of glucose in the blood. As a result, it is not unusual for patients to have high blood sugar levels and high blood insulin levels (a condition known as hyperinsulinemia) at the same time. If insulin resistance is not detected and treated, however, the islets of Langerhans (the insulin-secreting groups of cells) in the pancreas may eventually shut down and decrease in number.

    • ANSWER:
      The information offered by Crayon Girl is good. The foods that she’s telling you to avoid are high glycaemic index (GI) foods.

      Ideally you should be aiming to eat smaller meals, of low glycaemic index foods, but more frequently. So, instead of having 3 main meals in a day, you could try breaking this down to 6 smaller meals a day, with a few hours between them. This lessons the chances of you having a ‘sugar spike’ where your blood sugar level rises rapidly, causing your pancreas to release more insulin in an attempt to deal with it.

      Take a look at the following sites for more information on the Glycaemic Index [Glycemic Index, if you're American].

      The first site gives a list of the top 50 foods (though I don’t know who chose that 50) with their respective glycaemic index values.

      Edit:

      The lower the glycaemic index value, the less likely you are to produce more insulin in dealing with it.


Controlling Blood Sugar Levels With Food

There are two hormones that play the largest role in controlling blood sugar levels glucagon and insulin . These two hormones are antagonistic fashion is actually another. Another way to think this relationship is, for example, “Ying and Yang, one of the hormone level is high, the other hormone levels are low. Hormonal level that is significant, depends on what is your blood sugar. The brain constantly monitor blood sugar levels.

When blood sugar is low, an injection of the hormone glucagon will tell your body storage sites (primarily liver) to start releasing the glucose into the bloodstream. An injection of the hormone glucagon tells the body to put more sugar in the blood. The result is that the storage of glucose stops, stops production of fat and sugar is released into the bloodstream.

When blood sugar is high, insulin is in charge. Insulin is released to tell the body to put the excess sugar in the tissues. Insulin tells the body’s store of glycogen storage of excess sugar in the form, also tells the liver cells to stop making glucose. It also tells us that the fatty liver and fat cells.

Although these two hormones act in opposite directions, they are actually achieving the same goal. These two hormones is to maintain blood sugar levels. This “stable” level, which like the brain and allows it to operate at its best. The wonderful thing is done without human conscious, knowing that this is happening.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Does protein control blood sugar levels?
    Fish has protein and I was wondering if it lowers blood sugar if I take more protein foods with my normal meals

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, here is the jaz on nutrition and how it affects your daily bg levels.

      1. Simple carbohydrates = Sugars and anything else that is easily broken down and absorbed. chocolate, powdered sugar, all candies, cokes, and juices. These contain a sugar called dextrose or some other type of fast absorbing sugar. They can cause a quick spike in your blood sugar and cause problems.

      2. Complex Carbohydrates/Proteins = Breads, Pastas, starches in potatoes, steaks are a great source of protein and so is beef jerky. These are absorbed slowly into your blood stream causing a slower and longer rise in blood sugar over time.

      Here is what can happen.

      It is what i like to call Primary Spike / Secondary Spike.

      Your simple carbs are absorbed first and boom there is your first fast hard hitting spike that will affect you adversely, you will more than likely feel that one in like fifteen to thirty minutes depending on the intensity of the spike. Then when that spike has concluded, enough time has elapsed for your slow steady spike to begin…BOOM SECONDARY SPIKE! You see? Protein doesn’t control your bg levels nor do high glycemic index foods. They just delay the inevitable. You will spike regardless.

      Granted there are foods that you do eat that will spike your bg less. Wheat, whole grains, fish…etc. You can control your bg better by ingesting healthier foods. I have always suggested that any diabetic become a semi vegetarian in the manner that you should eat 75% more vegetables relative to a normal human being and then eat 25% of what you normally ingested before you were diagnosed as a diabetic. In this way you will have more of what won’t hurt you and less of what will. A good way to do this is to cover 75% of your plate with vegetables then take the other 25% and put whatever you want on it.

      Remember though, no food is 100% safe when you are diabetic. All foods technically become your worst enemy so watch what you eat and monitor your bg levels to see what spikes are the worst and at what times its at its worst.

      Primary w/ Secondary spikes are killer on the system.

      But there is something else you should know. Just because you are diabetic doesn’t mean that you can’t just splurge every now and again. Don’t allow anyone to tell you otherwise. Yes it’s dangerous, yes it may agitate your condition. But who cares for one day out of the month? Select a day out of the month and eat whatever you want that day only and it will help you take the edge off the arduous task of controlling your diabetes and help you keep your sanity.

  2. QUESTION:
    How to lower blood sugar levels with type II diabetes?
    My mother is a diabetic and she does her best to control her blood sugar. She used to drink lots of green tea after eating foods high in glucose and it used to lower her blood sugar. Unfortunately, she has just realized that she has kidney stones and the doctor told her to stop drinking green tea. Do you know of any other home remedy that she could use?

    Ps: she does take Gen Glybe ( perscribe medication) for her diabetes.

    • ANSWER:
      There are several home remedies other than green tea. They are all natural herbs that you can find in specific regions, together with certain vitamins and minerals.

      -Bitter melon juice
      -Cinnamon
      -Gymnema Sylvestre
      - Banaba

      Some of the home remedies are very difficult to get, it depends where do you live.
      For more info check the source below

  3. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for a diabetic person to get their blood sugar under control and not be diabetic anymore?
    So like:
    A diabetic person with a high blood sugar level exercises and eats the right food and gets their blood sugar under control (like the same level as a non-diabetic person). Is the person STILL diabetic?
    I am not diabetic. I was just curious because I don’t think there is a cure for diabetes as of right now. So yeah.

    • ANSWER:
      Well I am assuming your talking about type 2 diabetes because for type 1 diabetes once your pancreas is gone its gone. As for type two.. If you just have an insufficient amount of insulin being produced, as long as its still being produced then the diet and exercise is the right way to go. And just maybe you wont need the insulin shots, but yet your still a diabetic.

  4. QUESTION:
    What food should I avoid as a diabetic, in order to keep my blood sugars down?
    I am a diabetic trying to control my bolld sugar levels with food and diet.

    • ANSWER:
      Stay away from potatoes and pastas. These are foods that have alot of starches in them and the starches turn to sugar. Also stay away from your candies and cakes and pies unless they are sugar free. Drink diet drinks. You are not going to be able to stay away from sugars all together, as some foods naturally have sugar in them. I hope this helps you.

  5. QUESTION:
    If you have extremely low potassium and high blood sugar, can you lower blood sugar with potassium rich foods?
    I recently had a blood test before a surgery and my potassium was so low, they weren’t sure if they could do the surgery. I was given four huge potassium pills which got my potassium level up enough to do the surgery. I did some research on potassium and what affects low potassium can have on a person and my finding astounded me. What I found (on good reliable medical websites) was that if you have low potassium levels, you can have a glucose intolerance in the blood, meaning it can cause high blood sugar levels. I have been struggling with high blood sugar levels (in the 200′s) for the past four years (since 2006). I went back through my medical history and four years ago, I was given a diuretic to help me prevent kidney stones. My research also found that diuretics cause low potassium because the potassium in your body is flushed out through pee. Now with that said, is it possible that my high blood sugar was caused by me using a diuretic which lowered my potassium to scary levels?

    I just need some answers because I have never had any signs of diabetes except for the higher blood sugar and if potassium being low was the cause, maybe I don’t have diabetes after all. Maybe by increasing my intake of potassium rich foods will allow me to control my sugar levels. What do you think?

    • ANSWER:
      Going back to 2006 it’s where your potassium problems might have started, but by now they should have come back to normal. Besides the diuretics another thing that can make give you high blood sugar is any steroids like prednisone for inflammation. Unless you are on either one of these, and still have levels in the 200 range diabetes is still the answer. Normally the blood sugar is around 80-120 and in the 200′s is way too high. Potassium rich foods like banana’s will only push it up higher. Please go to your GP and get your blood sugar level checked asap. You only have one life and it’s too short to be wishing and hoping things. You definitely need to make a mature decision about this and now is the time to start doing things right so you can live a longer and happier one. Good luck and God Bless

  6. QUESTION:
    Fluctuating Fasting Blood Sugar Levels with Diet?
    My fasting blood sugar last year used to be 115-119 mg/dl. After that I started exercise and some diet control and fasting BS stays between 85-95 mg/dl. Now if I eat lot of sugar foods in a stretch of 3-4 days then the fasting blood sugar next days usually reads around 103-108 mg/dl range. But after 2-3 days it comes down to 90-95 mg/dl. I have been doing exercise regularly.

    Is it OK to let my fasting blood sugar go up to 100-110 mg/dl range when I eat high sugar food and let it get down in 2-3 days to below 100 mg/dl. Is this OK or do I need to always keep it under 100 mg/dl by not eating high sugar snacks. My doctor told me not to check my blood sugar often because he noticed that I am usually maintaining it below 100 mg/dl most of the time. But I like to assess my body and my fasting blood sugar pattern when I relax my diet. So I do check my fasting BS at home everytime I eat excess of high fatty or sugar meals.

    Please advise if I can let myself loose on diet occasionally and let the Fasting BS read between 100-110 mg/dl as long as it reads below 100 mg/dl in next 3-4 days.

    PS: For clarity of readers. I am not a diabetic nor do I take any medicines. The reason I go to my doctor is because of my high cholesterol that is controlled by exercise.
    My blood sugar 2 hours after meals is between 100-115 mg/dl.
    My HbA1C is 5.7%

    • ANSWER:
      If you were non-diabetic, then eating sugary foods wouldn’t be elevating your blood sugar well into the next day. I’ve tested enough non-diabetics in my life to know that they are usually below 100 mg/dL by two hours after eating a meal, regardless of the carbohydrates, and 100% normal by the next morning.

      Also, your fasting levels last year and this year (after indulging in sweets) are firmly in pre-diabetic range. Pre-diabetes IS diabetes; it’s just diabetes caught early. Pre-diabetes is not the first step on the path to diabetes. There are many earlier steps, like metabolic disorder and insulin resistance. Based on your high cholesterol and pre-diabetic fasting blood sugar, I’d say you do have metabolic disorder and are diabetic, but early staged and well controlled by diet and exercise. I’m not criticizing you. In fact, I think you’re doing a great job. I just also think that your doctor is doing you a disservice by not emphasizing to you that you are diabetic.

      Here’s another problem – because you don’t test after meals, you don’t see how high your blood sugar is after eating. In the early stages of diabetes, blood sugar can drop after a while into normal or near-normal range, so it’s entirely possible you’re spiking well into the 200s. We just can’t know.

      As for whether it’s “okay,” that just depends. If you’re over 140 mg/dL for several hours, I’d say that’s not okay to do very often. As a diabetic, I aim to fast under 100 mg/dL always because it’s truly normal, but a few days of slightly elevated fasting blood sugar won’t give you complications. Your blood sugar after meals may be damaging you, though. It’d depend on how high you’re spiking and how long you’re staying up there, as well as how often you are breaking your diet.

  7. QUESTION:
    blood sugar (please suggest something to lower it)?
    ever since I was diagnosed when I was twelve my blood sugar has rarely seen below 450 unless i was in the hospital. I do what the doctor asks me, I work out but I don’t know if it counts as exercising. I’m 16 now and my blood sugar levels usualy range around 550-600+(my metor just says “hi” when it goes past 600) I’m in Diabetic Ketoacidosus about 3 times a week. I’m wondering if stress causes it to go high? Sure I don’t really help with how much I eat. I eat low carb foods I just eat ALOT. I can’t help it though I get hungry REALLY hungry very often, I eat about 5 meals a day and have atleast 2 pounds of food on my plate, and I only weigh 127! I posted a thread about my body not being up to where it should be puberty wise, if I get my sugars under control will it allowe my body to grow normally again? I’m so confused and I don’t know what to do the doctors are telling me I’m gonna go blind by 20 and die at 30. but I’m doing what they tell me! I take like 5 fucking shots a day!

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you are not taking enough insulin, or your insulin is not effective.

      Are you storing it too long at room temperature?

      Have you tried a different insulin? Sometimes one will work better than another.

      High blood sugar can cause hunger, and if you’re a type 1, you will lose weight or be underweight. It sounds like your diabetes is being undertreated and you are eating too much as well.

      You are really in a vicious circle. You need to break out of it and the only way is probably increasing your insulin so that your blood sugar gradually comes down to more normal levels.

      You should be able to gradually decrease your food consumption. Even protien will raise your blood sugar if you eat too much of it, it just takes longer to do it. It sounds like you are overeating, causing high blood sugar and its gotten out of control.

      Its possible that you have parasites. Intestinal parasites are a lot more common than people think. They cause extreme hunger and malnurishment. It might be a good idea to look into this and get tested, just in case.

      Another thing to have checked is your thyroid. It might be overactive. There may be some underlying condition besides the diabetes that is affecting you.

      I think you should also ask for referral to a dietician, and/or an endocrinologist.

      Your doctor should not be allowing you to continously have such high blood sugar without doing more to help you get it down.

      Get some help. Change doctors if necessary. There is no way you can continue like this and survive without serious damage to your body.

  8. QUESTION:
    Any ideas on how to be most helpful to someone with an eating disorder?
    A relative that we love very much is so obese that her organs are collapsing from the weight of the fat. She’s mentally ill and is addicted to food. It’s so scary to watch her laboring to breathe, be unable to walk very far, and not know how to help her. Her mother is a weight watcher leader and has not been successful in helping her either. We love her and want her to live and it seems like she doesn’t care if she lives. Her thoughts and conversations are always about food and the next meals that she’s going to eat.
    She’s bright and manipulative and knows what foods will help her lose weight, control her blood sugar levels, and knows about portion sizes. If any of you have any suggestions that family members can do to help her, they will be so welcome. She takes multiple meds for her multiple health problems, has to use a ventilator, a C-PAP machine, and is now on insulin. Her doctors tell her it’s mandatory that she lose weight and she thinks she’s being picked on.

    • ANSWER:
      I would treat it like a drug problem. it’s an addiction, and it’s deadly.
      I would find a local therapist, see if they’re available to take her, and go see her with other friends/loved ones and do an “intervention”, if you will.
      Also look into rehab for obese people. This is really dangerous and it sounds like she needs professional help.

      http://dailystrength.org/support/Personal_Challenges/Obesity/?gclid=CMnK7YXH3ooCFR6AWAodfUe-2Q

  9. QUESTION:
    Ways to lower my blood sugar level?
    Is there maybe certain foods or anything I can eat?
    Or is there certain foods I should avoid?

    I am pregnant, and just failed a one hour glucose test. Because my blood sugar level was 161. So now I am trying to see if there is any way to get control of my blood sugar before I go back for a retest. Or at least see if my change in diet make any difference with my blood test results.

    I will be fasting before going for the glucose test.
    I am not going to do anything drastic. I just want to do a better job of choosing better foods for this pregnancy.

    • ANSWER:
      omg some of this advice is ridiculous!!! (apparently some people dont know how to handle diabetes).

      First off if you do indeed have diabetes no food will help you on the 3 hour glucose test because you will be fasting. Im saying this first hand because the night before i limited my carbs (yes carbs is what turns into sugar and affects your glucose levels) and it didnt make a difference i still failed the test.

      Being diabetic during pregnancy is not the end of world everything will be fine. Im saying this as if you already do have diabetes because 163 is high. It is supposed to be under 140. My one hour was 150. and my 3 hour glucose test came out a little bit worse because they load you up with more glucose than the first test.

      What will probably happen is they will refer you to a diabetes councelor and come up with a diet plan. They change your diet first before putting you on any medication because sometimes woman can control their diabetes by just a simple diet change. I have controlled it through the whole day but only have to take medication at night. You will be testing your blood roughly 4-8 times a day and your baby will also be monitored more closely. An ultrasound every 4 weeks is norm. to check the size of the baby and see the growth.

      My diet plan consists of 3 meals a day and 3 snacks a day.
      The meals are limited to 45 carbs per meal
      and 15-20 carbs per snack
      This all totals about 2000 calories a day give or take

      An example for breakfast is and egg sandwich with 2 eggs, with 2 slices of whole wheat bread and an apple with peanut butter.

      snack:yogurt and a handful of nuts

      Lunch:grilled chicken salad with vinigarette and a cup of rice

      snack: plum with a boiled egg

      Dinner: Hamburger patty with cheese on top, cup of rice or pasta, tomato wedges, and broccoli with little butter.

      Snack:half a grilled cheese sandwich and 1/2 cup of watermelon.

  10. QUESTION:
    Is any of this true about how good bananas are??
    Never, put your banana in the refrigerator!!!
    This is interesting.
    After reading this, you’ll never look at a banana in the same way again.

    Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy.
    Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes.
    But energy isn’t the only way a banana can help us keep fit.
    It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

    Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.
    PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

    Anemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.
    Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

    Brain Power: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.
    Constipation: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.
    Hangovers: One of the quickest
    ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.
    Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

    Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.
    Mosquito bites: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.
    Nerves: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.

    Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at wor k leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.
    Ulcers: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.
    Temperature control: Many other cultures see bananas as a “cooling” fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.

    Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.
    Smoking &Tobacco Use: Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.
    Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.
    Strokes: According to research in The New England Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!
    Warts: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, “A banana a day keeps the doctor away!”
    PASS IT ON TO YOUR FRIENDS
    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time! I will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe…polish with dry cloth. Amazing fruit !

    • ANSWER:
      i shall start eating a banana a day from tomorrow

  11. QUESTION:
    Low blood sugar in the morning… What do you eat for breakfast?
    My blood sugar is always incredibly low in the morning.
    I was just recently diagnosed with hypoglycemia, which is a blood sugar disorder. If I don’t eat every 3 hours my blood sugar drops and I get very ill (nausea, tremors, headaches, blackouts, dizziness.)

    I pretty much have it under control, except for in the morning. Every morning, no matter how much sleep I get, I wake up feeling like crap. I am incredibly nauseous every morning, sometimes to the point of dry-heaving. I usually have a headache in the morning until I eat something.

    I would like to hear what other hypoglycemics eat for breakfast. It is hard for me to keep food down since I am usually nauseous, so I usually gulp down an instant breakfast milkshake. I know this is not the best option for me though because it has alot of sugar. My doctor gave me a list of foods to eat, such as oats and granola and stuff like that, but I hate granola. I enjoy poached or fried eggs and toast, but again my stomach cannot handle those foods in the morning and I get sick, so I can only eat eggs later in the day.

    Is there a snack I can eat before I go to bed to prevent this also? Right now I eat nuts before I go to bed (which my doctor suggested) and it does not help my blood sugar levels the next morning.

    Please tell me what works for you personally! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      If your blood sugar is low when you wake up it would be best for you to eat some carbohydrates at bed time. Nuts are a great snack but they will NEVER hold you over night. A package of snack crackers, a few graham crackers with low fat peanut butter, a light yogurt, whole grain bread, etc. Something with carbohydrates will keep your sugar up and should hold it all night long so you don’t have to eat right out of bed in the morning.

  12. QUESTION:
    I am insulin resistance – a side effect of PCOS – anyone have any good recomendations for suitible diet?
    Definition
    Insulin resistance is not a disease as such but rather a state or condition in which a person’s body tissues have a lowered level of response to insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that helps to regulate the level of glucose (sugar) in the body. As a result, the person’s body produces larger quantities of insulin to maintain normal levels of glucose in the blood. There is considerable individual variation in sensitivity to insulin within the general population, with the most insulin-sensitive persons being as much as six times as sensitive to the hormone as those identified as most resistant. Some doctors use an arbitrary number, defining insulin resistance as a need for 200 or more units of insulin per day to control blood sugar levels. Various researchers have estimated that 3-16 percent of the general population in the United States and Canada is insulin-resistant; another figure that is sometimes given is 70-80 million Americans.
    Insulin resistance can be thought of as a set of metabolic dysfunctions associated with or contributing to a range of serious health problems. These disorders include type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes), the metabolic syndrome (formerly known as syndrome X), obesity, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Some doctors prefer the term “insulin resistance syndrome” to “metabolic syndrome.”
    Description
    To understand insulin resistance, it may be helpful for the reader to have a brief account of the way insulin works in the body. After a person eats a meal, digestive juices in the small intestine break down starch or complex sugars in the food into glucose, a simple sugar. The glucose then passes into the bloodstream. When the concentration of glucose in the blood reaches a certain point, the pancreas is stimulated to release insulin into the blood. As the insulin reaches cells in muscle and fatty (adipose) tissues, it attaches itself to molecules called insulin receptors on the surface of the cells. The activation of the insulin receptors sets in motion a series of complex biochemical signals within the cells that allow the cells to take in the glucose and convert it to energy. If the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin or the insulin receptors do not function properly, the cells cannot take in the glucose and the level of glucose in the blood remains high.
    The insulin may fail to bind to the insulin receptors for any of several reasons. Some persons inherit a gene mutation that leads to the production of a defective form of insulin that cannot bind normally to the insulin receptor. Others may have one of two types of abnormalities in the insulin receptors themselves. In type A, the insulin receptor is missing from the cell surface or does not function properly. In type B, the person’s immune system produces autoantibodies to the insulin receptor.
    In the early stages of insulin resistance, the pancreas steps up its production of insulin in order to control the increased levels of glucose in the blood. As a result, it is not unusual for patients to have high blood sugar levels and high blood insulin levels (a condition known as hyperinsulinemia) at the same time. If insulin resistance is not detected and treated, however, the islets of Langerhans (the insulin-secreting groups of cells) in the pancreas may eventually shut down and decrease in number.

    • ANSWER:
      The information offered by Crayon Girl is good. The foods that she’s telling you to avoid are high glycaemic index (GI) foods.

      Ideally you should be aiming to eat smaller meals, of low glycaemic index foods, but more frequently. So, instead of having 3 main meals in a day, you could try breaking this down to 6 smaller meals a day, with a few hours between them. This lessons the chances of you having a ‘sugar spike’ where your blood sugar level rises rapidly, causing your pancreas to release more insulin in an attempt to deal with it.

      Take a look at the following sites for more information on the Glycaemic Index [Glycemic Index, if you're American].

      The first site gives a list of the top 50 foods (though I don’t know who chose that 50) with their respective glycaemic index values.

      Edit:

      The lower the glycaemic index value, the less likely you are to produce more insulin in dealing with it.

  13. QUESTION:
    Have you had success with controlling Feline Diabetes with Wellness canned food?
    I’ve been feeding Wellness dry and my cats have done really good with it thier health has improved except for one cat who is on prednisolone which can contribute to elevated blood sugar. He is not likely to do better off of the medicine. The vet suggested switching to Purina DM or Friskies Beef flavor because they are lower in carbs. I have read the Wellness canned has 3% carbs versus 10% in the other foods suggested. I am not thrilled about feeding my cat foods from companies involved in the previous pet food recall. I don’t believe they are going to take anymore care in making food than before. The cost is nearly the same but the difference is Wellness is organic human grade food. I have seen some things on the internet from various pet owners that they’ve put thier cats on this with success have any of you had any luck with this. The goal would be to change the blood sugar level with out starting the cat on insulin by feeding a high protein diet.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Sophia…Wellness is an excellent dietary source for cats in general regardless of health. However, cats who have been diagnosed with feline diabetes require insulin to adjust for increased or decreased blood sugar. In cats with diabetes their pancreas no longer produces insulin so blood sugar will fluctuate too high or too low depending on their activity level, emotional level as well as how much and when they eat. The disease itself isn’t so clear cut as it differs from one cat to another so it is quite complicated to simplify this all within my answer to you.

      Here is a wonderfully well written website on feline diabetes that I hope you will find very helpful to learn how to manage the disease for your cat: http://felinediabetes.com/diabetes-info.htm

  14. QUESTION:
    This is from the American Diabetic Association?
    I’m more interested in how “Lisa”, patient mentioned in article was not testing correctly as stated by her doctor, any thoughts on this?

    _____________________________________________

    How can your A1C test results help your control? Here are two examples.

    Bob D., 49 years old, has type 2 diabetes. For the past seven years, he and his doctor have worked to control his blood sugar levels with diet and diabetes pills. Recently, Bob’s control has been getting worse. His doctor said that Bob might have to start insulin shots. But first, they agreed that Bob would try an exercise program to improve control.

    That was three months ago. Bob stuck to his exercise plan. Last week, when the doctor checked Bob’s blood sugar, it was near the normal range. But the doctor knew a single blood test only showed Bob’s control at that time. It didn’t say much about Bob’s overall blood sugar control.

    The doctor sent a sample of Bob’s blood to the lab for an A1C test. The test results would tell how well Bob’s blood sugar had been controlled, on average, for the past few months. The A1C test showed that Bob’s control had improved. With the A1C results, Bob and the doctor had proof that the exercise program was working. The test results also helped Bob know that he could make a difference in his blood sugar control.

    The A1C test can also help someone with type 1 diabetes. Nine-year-old Lisa J. and her parents were proud that she could do her own insulin shots and urine tests. Her doctor advised her to begin a routine of two shots a day and to check her blood sugar as well.

    Lisa kept records of all her test results. Most were close to the ideal range. But at her next checkup, the doctor checked her blood and found her blood sugar level was high. The doctor sent a sample of Lisa’s blood for an A1C test. The results showed that Lisa’s blood glucose control had in fact been poor for the last few months.

    Lisa’s doctor asked Lisa to do a blood sugar check. To the doctor’s surprise, Lisa turned on the timer of her meter before pricking her finger and putting the blood drop on the test strip. The doctor explained to Lisa and her parents that the way Lisa was testing was probably causing the blood sugar test errors.

    With time and more accurate blood sugar results, Lisa and her parents got better at using her results to keep food, insulin, and exercise in balance. At later checkups, her blood sugar records and the A1C test results showed good news about her control.

    A1C tests can help:
    Here’s an update from the original article:

    http://www.everydayhealth.com/publicsite/news/view.aspx?id=627833&xid=nl_EverydayHealthManagingDiabetes_20090609

    • ANSWER:
      Annie….I really liked the information you have provided here about the importance of the A1C test, but remember this, tests are fallible to a degree. They are “Instrumental” at best. The only other problem here is, you lead the reader to think that maybe you are comparing the two scenarios, which after thinking about it, I am hoping that is NOT the case.
      Think of the A1C as the reflection of “Work Done” as a diabetic. In other words see that the A1C shows the effort the patient has expended in terms of exercise, in the elimination of excess static sugars in the blood. Having said that, exercise for patients of Type I and Type II are equally beneficial.
      It is equally beneficial to understand that the insulan production of a type I is usually too little or non-existant, hence the reliance on Insulin replacement therapy. So then the question is, how much exercise in comparison to static blood sugar and insulin infusion. There in lies the problem with type I’s, concerning hypoglycemia or insulin shock. It is truly a difficult prospect to encure and then alleviate or at best manage. Unfortuneately, this then requires a higher level of “Proper Testing Protocol” throughout the day, everyday. Not just in terms of the pain issue, but in the term of the mundane routine. Typically, stellar adherence to proper protocol in testing is not within the grasp of most 9 year olds, again, I say in “most” 9 year olds. This then, becomes the weak link. And “Balance is then crucial”.

      I pray that the child Lisa does well, the future for her will depend on her adherance now. I am sure that you see the effects of Type I diabetes far outways those of the Type II, only in that of the differance of age.

  15. QUESTION:
    help, im poor and having trouble controlling my diabetes?
    I was diagnosed with Diabetes a few months back. But I am only working 24-48 hours a month and already behind on bills and rent, therefore I cannot afford a doctor right now, and the “free” clinics wont help me either. my blood sugar level is usually high (around 270-320) even when I do my best to control it. I still don’t eat right like I should, I usually eat once or twice a day and its usually pasta or meat products. I don’t eat veggies (I know I should, I just grew up not liking them and still don’t). I used to drink ALOT of soda (like a 12pack a day) but now have cut back to maybe 2-3cans every few days and usually only on the weekends when I work overnight (caffeine). I try (and usually always do) walk every night, but its not a jog or to brisk of a walk because I have a bad leg due to a metal rod in it from being hit by a car. I don’t drink alchoal or smoke tobacco. I used to smoke pot, but havent for like 2-3 months, as Im trying to find another job. Ironicly I seemed to have better levels when I was smoking. but that may just because I wasnt stressed as much, I dunno. but my main question is how can I control my levels better without help from the doctors, and preferably without to much vegtiable eating (I am working on this, i promise..but its a hard habit to kick) and also…why is my levels always floating around 200 even with little to no sugar intake? is it from…bread? or maybe the pasta? (macaroni) Im sorry if this post is unorganized or chatoic, but i tend to ramble.

    Also, any over the counter or health food remedies thatmight help (and arn’t that expensive), please share.

    I realize that Im not doing all thatI should, but I am working hard to break the habits, its just me being stubborn. I am worried about my future and being here for my family (fiance and daughter). so please don’t hate or direct any “you don’t care” responses. its just hard being basicly poor and dealing with this diesease. thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Okay, you clearly have discipline issues, but at the same time you also have self-awareness.

      “I don’t eat veggies (I know I should, I just grew up not liking them and still don’t).”
      Eat veggies. The fact that you didn’t like them in the past is completely irrelevant, when we consider the prospect of your not being there for your fiance and daughter.

      “I used to drink ALOT of soda (like a 12pack a day) but now have cut back to maybe 2-3cans every few days and usually only on the weekends when I work overnight (caffeine). ”
      Stop drinking Soda.

      “I try (and usually always do) walk every night, but its not a jog or to brisk of a walk because I have a bad leg due to a metal rod in it from being hit by a car.”
      This is good.

      “I don’t drink alchoal or smoke tobacco. ”
      This is good.

      “I used to smoke pot, but havent for like 2-3 months, as Im trying to find another job. Ironicly I seemed to have better levels when I was smoking. but that may just because I wasnt stressed as much, I dunno.”
      It’s good that you aren’t doing pot right now. I don’t like your mentality on this. Do not do pot even if you find a job. You are poor. You do not have enough money to waste on pot. It may sound draconian, but every time you say no to smoking pot you are saying you love your daughter enough to reallocate money for more family-friendly needs.

      There are so-called “benefits” to drugs. Otherwise people would not take them. One benefit of smoking tobacco is the reduction of appetite and the subsequent loss of weight. However, there are serious consequences to smoking, and it appears that the medical community thinks that smoking is in general bad. I believe it is the same for pot, unless there is some sort of medical reason you’re doing it. By medical reason, I’m not talking about YOUR medical opinion. I’m talking about a licensed doctor who knows what he/she’s talking about when it comes to drugs. So do not think this is an excuse for you to spend money on pot.

      “but my main question is how can I control my levels better without help from the doctors, and preferably without to much vegtiable eating (I am working on this, i promise..but its a hard habit to kick)”
      Go find vegetarian cookbook. It is very difficult to deal with this without some sort of medical attention.

      “and also…why is my levels always floating around 200 even with little to no sugar intake? is it from…bread? or maybe the pasta? (macaroni) Im sorry if this post is unorganized or chatoic, but i tend to ramble.”
      I think bread and pasta are sources of “simple sugars”. Go look up this stuff on the Internet to see what carbohydrate sources are okay for you.

      Good luck. Just remember, you’re doing it for your fiancee and daughter.

  16. QUESTION:
    whats happening to my blood glucose levels?
    Hi I am 25 years old, female and i’m 13.5 stones. In April this year I was diagnosed with type 2 diabeties. I went through a very bad time, I get very anxious with any sort of medical appointment, and the month I was diagnosed, every day I had some sort of letter through the post telling me about this appointment and that appointment. I decided to fill in a form to say I did not want to attend the appointments and didnt want any mail regarding it. I am just diet controlled so I cut out all sugars, lowered my carbs and for about 3 months I managed to control my blood glucose very well. I lost 6 stones in 5.5 months and joined a gym. I felt like a new person. I tested my blood sugars using a blood sugar monitor about 5 or 6 times a day to ensure I was in control. (very expensive)!

    Suddenly, my blood sugars went from 4.6ish waking and 2hrs after meals (which is where it was since after diagnosis), to the mid 5′s mmol, then the next week the mid 6′s, then the mid 8′s, then 10mmol and so on and so on, and now it’s at the mid 16mmol with a reading of 17.9 on return from work today.

    These rises have happened in a matter of 2 months and where I thought, perhaps i’m coming down with something, i havn’t and they continue to rise. I tested my urine for ketones just now and it is showing a very dark purple (I assume that means I have ketones in my urine). I’ve been feeling okish, a little vague and weak on some days, I just generally feel lazy. Nothing has changed, I’ve been eating the same foods, doing the same excercise etc.

    I’ve got an appointment booked with my doctor tomorrow which i’m scared about, i think he will be happy with my weight loss, but im so concerned now about my blood sugars. any ideas on what my body is playing at and what my doctor may suggest? thanks for reading.

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, I salute you for taking proactive steps to control your diabetes. You have done everything ‘right’ and the proof of that is your good blood sugar control initially.

      Unfortunately though, diabetes is a progressive disease and no matter what one does, sometimes, one can’t fight against it. It’s like somebody diagnosed with myopia, another progressive disease. Myopia often gets worse over the years no matter what the person does or doesn’t do (eat more carrots, only read in well-lit areas etc). It sounds like that’s what is happening with your diabetes.

      There is also another possible explanation and that is that you have been misdiagnosed and actually have Type 1 diabetes. The difference is as follows: In Type 2, the person still makes insulin, but their body does not respond to it well. Low carb/diet/exercise can improve insulin sensitivity and thus blood sugar levels can be controlled.

      In Type 1, the person’s body attacks itself, and they do not produce any insulin anymore. No amount of diet/exercise is going to help. They have to inject insulin to survive.

      While diabetes is progressive, the type of rises in blood sugar that you describe are just too rapid and too severe. It really sounds to me as if you might actually have Type 1. Many people, including many in the medical profession, think that only children get Type 1. But people can get Type 1 at any age. I got it at age 38, and I know a few people who got it in their 50s.

      So when you see the doctor, please ask to be tested for Type 1. Ask to be tested for antibodies. Also ask for a C-peptide test. This measures how much insulin your body is making. Type 1s make very little or no insulin while Type 2s make normal/large amounts of insulin.

      Good luck. I hope this gets sorted out soon.

  17. QUESTION:
    this is interesting,i know they are long people’s but their good! this also is a mother in law thing! lol?
    Subject: FW: [Fwd: Fw: THE BANANA]

    There may be some truth in this one

    The Banana

    Never, put your banana in the refrigerator!!!

    This is interesting.

    After reading this, you’ll never look at a banana in the same
    way again.

    Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and
    glucose combined with fibre. A banana gives an instant,
    sustained and substantial boost of energy. Research has proven
    that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous
    90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one
    fruit with the world’s leading athletes. But energy isn’t the
    only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help
    overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and
    conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

    Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND
    amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much
    better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain
    tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into
    serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and
    generally make you feel happier.

    PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it
    contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your
    mood.

    Anaemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of
    haemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anaemia.

    Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high
    in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood
    pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has
    just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for
    the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and
    stroke.

    Brain Power: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school
    were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at
    breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain
    power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can
    assist learning by making pupils more alert.

    Constipation: High in fibre, including bananas in the diet can
    help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the
    problem without resorting to laxatives.

    Hangovers: One of the quickest
    ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake,
    sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with
    the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels,
    while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

    Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body,
    so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for
    soothing relief.

    Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to
    keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness

    Mosquito bites: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try
    rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin.
    Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling
    and irritation.

    Nerves: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the
    nervous system.

    Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology
    in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort
    food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital
    patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to
    be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid
    panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood
    sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two
    hours to keep levels steady.

    Ulcers: The banana is used as the dietary food against
    intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and
    smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without
    distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes
    over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of
    the stomach.

    Temperature control: Many other cultures see bananas as a
    “cooling” fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional
    temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example,
    pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a
    cool temperature.

    Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Bananas can help SAD
    sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer
    tryptophan.

    Smoking &Tobacco Use: Bananas can also help people trying to
    give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the
    potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover
    from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.

    Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize
    the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your
    body’s water balance When we are stressed, our metabolic rate
    rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be
    rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.

    Strokes: According to research in The New England Journal of
    Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the
    risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!

    Warts: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you
    want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place
    it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the
    skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When
    you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein,
    twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times
    the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and
    minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best
    value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known
    phrase so that we say, “A banana a day keeps the doctor away!”

    PASS IT ON TO YOUR FRIENDS
    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the
    time! I will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes??
    Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the
    shoe…polish with dry cloth.

    Amazing fruit!

    • ANSWER:
      This is the best information I have received in awhile.
      Thank you for sharing..

  18. QUESTION:
    Do you know how wonderous Banana is?
    This is interesting.
    After reading this, you’ll never look at a banana in the same way again.

    Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy

    Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes.

    But energy isn’t the only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

    DEPRESSION: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

    PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

    ANEMIA: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.

    BLOOD PRESSURE: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

    BRAIN POWER: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school ( England ) were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power.. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.

    CONSTIPATION: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.

    HANGOVERS: One of the quickest ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

    HEARTBURN: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

    MORNING SICKNESS: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.

    MOSQUITO BITE: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.

    NERVES: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.

    Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and chips. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.

    ULCERS: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.

    TEMPERATURE CONTROL: Many other cultures see bananas as a ‘cooling’ fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.

    SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER (SAD): Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.

    SMOKING AND TOBACCO USE: Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.

    STRESS: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.

    STROKES: According to research in The New England Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!

    WARTS: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four
    POLL: Do you think it is interesting?
    The ending paragraph:

    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, ‘A banana a day keeps the doctor away!’

    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time! I will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe…polish with dry cloth. Amazing fruit !!!

    • ANSWER:
      Superb info. Thanks a lot. Now I have started eating Bananas and really they are helpful!! Thank You.

  19. QUESTION:
    What do you think is the most nutritious fruit and vegetable in the whole world?
    I love fruits and vegetables much because these are good for my diet especially banana. I will share you something about banana. I received this e-mail from my friend in Japan.

    Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

    PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

    Anemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.

    Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

    Brain Power: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.

    Constipation: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.

    Hangovers: One of the quickest
    ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

    Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

    Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.

    Mosquito bites: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.

    Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.

    Ulcers: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.

    Temperature control: Many other cultures see bananas as a ‘cooling’ fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.

    Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.

    Smoking & Tobacco Use: Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassiu! m and ma gnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.

    Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.

    Strokes: According to research in ‘The New England Journal of Medicine, ‘eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!

    Warts: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

    • ANSWER:
      Perhaps it would be Spirulina which is one of the green super foods that also include Chlorella, Barley Grass, Wheatgrass and Alfalfa.

      Spirulina is rich in complete protein, beta carotenes (vitamin A precursor), vitamin B12, chlorophyll and iron as well as antioxidants, enzymes, amino acids, minerals and vitamins.

  20. QUESTION:
    Do you know about these banana facts?
    BANANAS�

    A professor at CCNY for a physiological psych class told his class about�
    Bananas. �He said the expression ‘going bananas’ is from the effects of�
    Bananas on the brain. �Read on:�

    Never, put your banana in the refrigerator!!!�
    This is interesting.�
    After reading this, you’ll never look at a banana in the same way�
    Again.�

    Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose�
    Combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial�
    Boost of energy.�

    Research has proven that just two bananas provide�
    Enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the�
    Number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes.�

    But energy isn’t�
    The only way a banana can help us keep fit.�It can�
    Also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and�
    Conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.�

    Depression:�
    According to a recent�
    Survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt�
    Much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan,�
    A type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you�
    Relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.�

    PMS:�Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it�
    Contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.�

    Anemia:�High�
    In iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and�
    So helps in cases of anemia.�

    Blood�
    Pressure:�This unique�
    Tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it�
    Perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug�
    Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims�
    For the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.�

    Brain�
    Power:�200 students at a�
    Twickenham (Middlesex) school were helped through their exams this year by�
    Eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain�
    Power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning�
    By making pupils more alert.�

    Constipation:�
    High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel�
    Action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.�

    Hangovers:�
    One of the quickest�
    Ways of curing a hangover is to�
    Make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach�
    And, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while�
    The milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.�

    Heartburn:�Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if�
    You suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.�

    Morning�
    Sickness:�Snacking on�
    Bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning�
    Sickness.�

    Mosquito bites:�Before reaching for the insect bite cream,�
    Try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people�
    Find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.�

    Nerves:�
    Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.�

    Overweight�
    And at work? Studies at the�
    Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on�
    Comfort food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients,�
    Researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs.�
    The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to�
    Control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every�
    Two hours to keep levels steady.�

    Ulcers:�The�
    Banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its�
    Soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten�
    Without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity�
    And reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.�

    Temperature control:�Many other cultures see bananas as a�
    ‘cooling’ fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of�
    Expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to�
    Ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.�

    Seasonal�
    Affective Disorder (SAD):�Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood�
    Enhancer tryptophan.�

    Smoking &Tobacco�
    Use:�Bananas can also help�
    People trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the�
    Potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects�
    of nicotine withdrawal. < BR>

    Stress:�Potassium�
    is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the�
    brain and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our�
    metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be�
    rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.�

    Strokes:�According to research in The New England Journal of�
    Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death�
    by strokes by as much as 40%!�

    Warts:�Those�
    keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a�
    piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out.�
    Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!�

    So, a banana�
    really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it�
    has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the�
    phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins�
    and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods�
    around. �So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, ‘A�
    banana a day keeps the doctor away!’�

    PASS IT ON TO YOUR FRIENDS�
    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time! I�
    will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the�
    banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe…polish with dry cloth. Amazing�
    fruit�!�

    • ANSWER:
      Omggg Ahhhh that is seriously so cool!
      im going to show my whole family haha.
      :) Thaaaankss.

  21. QUESTION:
    What is happening in my case? Advice needed. Please help.?
    Hi all,

    I am 29 years old, I conceived after 8 years of my marriage through IUI. I went for 3 cycles and the last one has been clicked. I have no complications when I was conceived. In the fourth month I have been diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes. From that time, I have taken the insulin daily to keep my blood sugar under control. But my doctor told not to control the food except sweets and sugar because the baby wouldn’t grow. So I completely cut off the sugar items in all my food but as a south Indian, I ate rice twice a day. Taken all the precautions in all angels. And I went to my mom’s place in my 3rd month of pregnancy. Everything was fine till the 8th month. Suddenly in 33rd week I noticed that there were no movements of my baby. I went for scan and doctor confirmed that there is no heart beat and movements. Doctor told that It is an Intra Uterine Death of 32 weeks because of Gestational Diabetes. Is that true? Why it was happened? Now a days many people are having Gestational Diabetes. They are not having their children? Many people are happily conceiving and having their babies who are already diagnosed with diabetes? But in my case what happened? And my doctor told that, it’s all your fate.
    I delivered a healthy male child through normal delivery. After delivery my sugar levels are controlled. But now I am facing another problem. The day before yesterday my fasting blood sugar is 65mg as per glucometer. After lunch (with 1.5 hour gap) I tested again with my glucometer and it showed the reading was 178mg/dl. I was a little bit worried and checked again within a half minute and it showed 160mg/dl. Why so? What is the correct reading? Why it was decreased 18 points? The second level is under control. Then I did the test after my dinner and it showed 113mg/dl. Again I checked within the minute it showed 146, and again 135. Which was correct? I was confused a lot. Again yesterday I tested after lunch it showed 199 and 165mg/dl. Again I tested after my dinner it was 216, 205, and 201. And today morning my fasting BS is 102mg/dl. Am I diabetic? I am in a confused state. What reading I should consider? Does sugar levels vary that much in a very short span of time or with in a minute? There is an information on my glucometer manual is that, “Don’t use the glucometer for the diagnosis of diabetes. It is for the monitoring of blood sugar levels of diabetic patients only.” Doctors will also check through the blood test and confirm the diabetes and not by this kind of meters. I need a sincere advice, what should I do? I am worrying about my readings? Why that much variation occur? What is the correct reading of my blood sugar? Am I diabetic or not? Please advice.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jasmine.

    • ANSWER:

  22. QUESTION:
    10 points for best answer yay….plzzz help?
    q1.) How many servings of the Grains Group should a healthy teen try to eat each day?
    A. 12 to 16
    B. 1 to 4
    C. 4 to 8
    D. 6 to 11

    q2.) Which is a mental/emotional benefit from physical activity?
    A. stress reduction
    B. control of blood sugar levels
    C. improvement of one’s sense of balance
    D. meeting new people

    q3.)

    Which nutrients provide the body with most of its energy?
    A. fats
    B. proteins
    C. carbohydrates
    D. vitamins

    q4.) Which is an example of a food with high nutrition density?
    A. plain bagel
    B. ice cream
    C. cheeseburger
    D. french fries

    q5.) Which is a question you should ask when evaluating a decision you have made?
    A. “Why was that decision so difficult?”
    B. “What is my situation?”
    C. How did my decision affect others?”
    D. “Now that I have made my decision, what is the first step?”

    Which statement about adolescence is true?
    A. Hormones in some teens cause significant growth spurts.
    B. All teens experience some physical, emotional, and social changes during adolescence.
    C. All teens experience adolescence in the same way.
    D. All teens experience adolescence at the same time.

    • ANSWER:
      www.sparkteen.com

      Why dont you read the chapter so you can find the answers?

  23. QUESTION:
    10 points for best ans yay……………plzzzz help me?
    q1.) How many servings of the Grains Group should a healthy teen try to eat each day?
    A. 12 to 16
    B. 1 to 4
    C. 4 to 8
    D. 6 to 11

    q2.) Which is a mental/emotional benefit from physical activity?
    A. stress reduction
    B. control of blood sugar levels
    C. improvement of one’s sense of balance
    D. meeting new people

    q3.)

    Which nutrients provide the body with most of its energy?
    A. fats
    B. proteins
    C. carbohydrates
    D. vitamins

    q4.) Which is an example of a food with high nutrition density?
    A. plain bagel
    B. ice cream
    C. cheeseburger
    D. french fries

    q5.) Which is a question you should ask when evaluating a decision you have made?
    A. “Why was that decision so difficult?”
    B. “What is my situation?”
    C. How did my decision affect others?”
    D. “Now that I have made my decision, what is the first step?”

    Which statement about adolescence is true?
    A. Hormones in some teens cause significant growth spurts.
    B. All teens experience some physical, emotional, and social changes during adolescence.
    C. All teens experience adolescence in the same way.
    D. All teens experience adolescence at the same time.

    • ANSWER:
      these all depends on ur size relli but it’s A 12-16–i have a nutritonist :)
      2. A
      3. C but u need all of them no matter what or ur body wont fucntion properly
      4. well relli all of them but the one with the highest cals for it’s size a cheese burger then ice cream
      5.wel relli B C and D but i would say D is most logical

      and the last one
      B no doubt

      soo it’s
      A, A, C, C, D, B

  24. QUESTION:
    I tested my blood sugar this morning, it was 113, am I a Diabetic?
    I’m 54, and I have not been feeling very well lately. I was thinking that it had to do with my hormones, since I have not been on any hormones of any kind and my hot flashes are getting worse. I had been researching bio-identical hormones and I already made an appointment with a doctor. Besides hot flashes I had been feeling a little tired, and I’m losing weight. I thought it was because I don’t eat much, just breakfast, a protein shake for lunch and a salad with fruits a veggies and chicken for dinner. I drink lots of water, so going to the bathroom with frequency, is normal to me.

    I have a tendency to not eat for many hours like yesterday, when I had breakfast around 9:30 am and no lunch until 5:00 pm, when I was so hungry that I went out and got spaghetti and meat balls; and then at night I only had chocolate ice cream :) (I know… this was bad!). This was unusual for me, I rarely eat pasta and ice cream at night, I was busy and I had no other food around, and I would not do it again, I promise. I do exercise at least 3 times a week.

    So, would this reading of 113 be due to the pasta and ice cream? or does it mean I am a diabetic already. Could I control it by keeping track of food intake and sugar levels during day? Could I manage my sugars with just diet and exercise? Do I have to go to a doctor and start taking medicine? Is there a natural way to fight this? Lots of questions, I know… but I’m confuse on what to do first, and before I go out and buy books and food, I wanted to see what you all think. Two other facts: both of my parents are diabetic and I do not have insurance. Thanks:)
    To gazeygoo: thank you for your answer. I am probably paranoic and with reason, as diabetes runs in all my family; That’s why, I had bought test kit and periodically I check my blood sugar, specially when I’m not feeling well. I took the reading first thing this morning, with my home test kit, before any food intake. I have never had this reading before, no matter what I ate. I hope you are right :) Thanks again!

    • ANSWER:
      Keep your weight down. If your over weight it can help you on your way to being a diabetic. A blood sugar of 113 is good. Cinnamon is good to lower blood sugar and vinegar is another. Dill pickles also are good for blood sugar as the have 0 carbs. When you are looking at the label pay close attention to the carbs. At times foods with 0 sugar can be high in carbs.

  25. QUESTION:
    alternative to evo cat food?
    I’ve been feeding my 2 cats Natura Evo (weight mgmt and chicken/turkey formulas). I’ve also been supplementing canned Evo. Last week, after feeding some canned Evo, both cats got diarrhea. It’s been about a week now! (They’re still happy, active, etc..been giving natural remedies, pumpkin, plain yogurt to try to cure it) They have never had problems with it before. I spoke with the pet store employees, and they believe the formula was changed after P&G bought Evo. (Someone else’s dogs, who never had problems with Evo before, suddenly got diarrhea, too.)

    I’m certain the batches of dry cat food I have is just fine, but I will be switching to another brand when I run out…then comes the question:

    Does anyone have any suggestions for a good, very low grain, high protein cat food? (Evo has really been helping control one of my cat’s blood sugar levels…it’s a shame they were bought out!)

    • ANSWER:
      Evo did that to our cats too, the dry and the canned. They absolutely refused to eat the canned Beef version as well.

      Try any of these–
      Indigo
      Blue Buffalo
      Wellness
      Wellness Core
      Royal Canin Siamese 38
      Wysong Vitality
      Prairie
      Fromm Duck

      Our diabetic cat did great on the RC Siamese 38 (dry) with Fancy Feast ‘feasts’ with no added gravy. The chart for food comparisons for diabetic cats is available online, just do a google search for Janet & Binkys Food and you’ll find the comparison tables. We watched for high protein, low fat and low carb. He did really well with them.

  26. QUESTION:
    Teenager With Type 1 Diabetes?
    Hi there,
    I am type a type 1 diabetic.
    I just can’t keep my blood sugar levels in control.
    I try to have a healthy diet in the day, but when I come home I just pig out, which makes my sugars go up very high.
    I guess I eat junk food in the afternoon as I haven’t had it all day and start to crave it.
    I think I’m not motivated enough to keep it in control because I always worry about getting complications.
    Any help on what I should do?
    Thankyou.

    • ANSWER:
      Preventing complications relies on you staying motivated enough to maintain good glyceamic control.

      I suggest you see your doctor or diabetes nurse educator as your insulin is insufficient for what you are eating. However, you may also want to see a dietician who can give you advice on what to eat.

      You said that you eat healthy foods during the day, which is great. You should try to eat as many low GI foods as you can during the day, which may prevent you from getting hungry by the time you get home.
      If you are hungry when you get home, try something a little healthier (fruit is probably the best option, such as apples, pears, peaches, melon, berries, a handful of grapes etc). Or try a cheese sandwich on wholegrain bread, some crackers with cheese or meat, some nuts, yoghurt with fruit… there’s heaps of stuff that you could eat rather than reaching for the junk food.
      Make sure you drink plenty of water throughout the day too, as thirst is often mistaken for hunger.

      Hope I’ve helped you out. Let me know if you have any more questions, I’m happy to help. :)

  27. QUESTION:
    Is this healthy? It might be a bit long to read.?
    (It might be a bit long to read)
    I have been diabetic since i was 2 but i didn’t have ant knowledge about it since a year ago
    i used to secretly hid away Sweet and Chocolate from my mum because i didn’t understand why i couldn’t have it and no one explained to me the complication of high blood sugar
    i am aware of everything now but for a whole year i suffered really high blood sugar and it had affect my eye as i now suffer With background retinopathy

    now i find even little food makes a big impact on my blood sugar e.g a grape
    sometimes my blood sugar level could rise up to 27.8mmol just due to stress or even a small slice of pizza even a banana

    Now this is the diet i follow
    Breakfast: yogurt and rice cake
    Snack :cucumber with cream cheese
    Lunch: gluten free bread (i also have celiac disease) with cheese salad filling (filling is also varied)
    snack: 10 almonds and fruit usually varied
    Dinner: brown rice and chicken with green pepper (usually varied)

    i want to know is this healthy and do i eat enough?
    i also exercise 5 time a week for 45 minutes moderate intensity
    this enables me to control my blood sugar, at the moment it is at 6.7mmol A1C

    • ANSWER:
      It is common in this forum for respondents not to be familiar with the units being referenced. A glucose of 27.8 mmol/L is 500 mg/dL. A glucose of 6.7 mmol/L is 121 mg/dL although I suspect that you may be referring to an A1C of 6.7%. The A1C is reported in % not mmol/L or mg/dL. The A1C represents the 90 day mean (average) glucose. An A1C of 6.7% approximates a 90 day mean glucose of 8.1 mmol/L or 146 mg/dL. An A1C is near the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists goal of 6.5% which approximates a 90 day mean glucose of 7.8 mmol/L or 141 mg/dL. Given the combination of Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes I would very strongly encourage you to seek the advice of a dietitian. This is simply not the forum to seek such information. For example you describe a single day’s intake but you need a varied diet and only a qualified dietitian will be able to work that out with you. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless.

  28. QUESTION:
    Double Checking Answers On Nutrition Basics. HELP PLEASE! (:?
    I put brackets around my answers. example: [A]

    PLEASE! let me know if they are correct or not. thank you.

    1. One positive attribute of dietary fat is that it’s a good
    source of
    A. water.
    B. boron.
    C. vitamin C
    [D]. energy.

    2. Which one of the following choices is the best way to control
    Type II diabetes?
    A. Injecting insulin
    B. Avoiding all simple sugars
    [C]. Adopting a healthy diet and exercising
    D. Avoiding salt

    3. Which one of the following snacks provides all of the essential amino acids?
    A. Apple wedges and carrot sticks
    [B]. Small bowl of chili beans and rice
    C. Corn on the cob
    D. Pasta salad with vinaigrette dressing

    4. Which one of the following choices is the best way to build muscle bulk?
    A. Use amino acid powders from a health food store.
    B. Eat more high-protein foods.
    C. Avoid vegetarian diets.
    [D]. Eat a healthy, balanced diet and follow a regular fitness program.

    5. High triglycerides increase the risk for which one of the following conditions?
    A. Type II diabetes
    [B]. Heart disease
    C. Thyroid disease
    D. Osteoporosis

    6. Saturated fats found in animal productsGDLuch as bacon and cheese, are also called
    A. cholesterol.
    [B]. triglycerides.
    C. lipids.
    D. amino acids.

    7. An elevated HDL is considered a
    A. risk factor for osteoporosis.
    B. risk factor for arthritis.
    [C]. less harmful form of cholesterol found in the body.
    D. more harmful form of cholesterol found in the body.

    8. How can a person with lactose intolerance obtain dietary calcium?
    [A]. Take a pill that helps to digest lactose.
    B. Eat green leafy vegetables, nuts, and enriched soy products.
    C. Eat lots of fresh shellfish.
    D. Eat lots of whole grains.

    9. Which one of the following choices is most accurate about fat-soluble vitamins?
    A. They can cause gastric upset, diarrhea, and kidney stones.
    B. They provide no risk of vitamin toxicity.
    [C]. They can be stored in the body.
    D. They help build collagen and aid in healing.

    10. The glycemic index predicts the way certain foods affect
    [A]. blood sugar levels.
    B. weight loss.
    C. exercise performance.
    D. blood pressure.

    11. What are the health benefits of zinc?
    A. Reduced muscle fatigue
    [B]. Proper wound healing
    C. Control of blood pressure
    D. Lung efficiency

    12. Which one of the following factors contributes to hypertension?
    A. A vigorous exercise regimen
    B. A lack of sleep
    C. A diet that lacks protein
    [D]. A high-fat diet

    13. Which one of the following choices is the best option for a vegan snack?
    A. Vanilla soymilk, peanut butter, and pretzels
    B. Almond milk with butter cookies
    [C]. Chocolate soymilk with angel food cake
    D. Tomato juice and macaroni and cheese

    14. How should daily calorie intake be divided for an adult in good health?
    A. 80 percent carbohydrates, 20 percent proteins
    B. 60 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent proteins
    [C]. 60 percent carbohydrates, 30 percent fats, 10 percent proteins
    D. 80 percent proteins, 10 percent carbohydrates, 10 percent fats

    15. A person who is lactose intolerant would have difficulty digesting which one of the
    following foods?
    A. Grilled veggie burger on a sesame bun
    [B]. Low-fat cheesecake with raspberries
    C. Turkey hot dog with mustard
    D. Three-bean salad

    16. Which one of the following choices is the most nutrient-dense snack?
    [A]. Sliced bananas, walnuts, and orange sections
    B. Baked potato chips and sparkling water
    C. Green salad with ranch dressing
    D. Unsalted pretzels and cheddar cheese

    17. To derive energy from food, you must eat foods that contain
    A. vitamins and minerals.
    [B]. carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.
    C. water.
    D. fiber.

    18. Which one of the following choices is a simple sugar?
    A. Glucose
    B. Orange juice
    C. Lactase
    [D]. Chocolate

    19. Which one of the following snack combinations will best satisfy a person’s daily
    fluid requirements?
    A. Ice cream, sherbet, and fruit
    B. Bananas, whole-wheat bread, and water
    [C]. Fresh fruit, green salad, water
    D. Fruit juice, energy bars, cold cereal

    20 Which one of the following choices would be an acceptable small meal for a person
    who is gluten intolerant?
    [A]. Microwave popcorn and carrot sticks
    B. Peanut butter on whole-wheat toast
    C. Bread sticks with low-fat dressing
    D. Orange juice and graham crackers

    • ANSWER:
      You better send each and every question separately..

  29. QUESTION:
    Can someone please help me!!!?
    One positive attribute of dietary fat is that it’s a good source of?
    A)water
    B)boron
    C)vitamin C
    D)energy

    Which one of the following choices is the best way to control Type II diabetes?
    A)Inject insulin
    B)Avoiding all simple sugars
    C)Adopting a healthy diet & excercising
    D)Avoiding salt

    which one of the following snacks provides all of the essential amino acids?
    A)Apple wedges & carrot sticks
    B)small bowl of chili beans & rice
    C)Corn on the cob
    D)Pasta salad with vinaigrette dressing

    which on of the following choices is the best way to build muscle bulk?
    A)use amino acid powders from a health food store
    B)eat more high-protein foods
    C)avoid vegetarian diets
    D)eat a healthy,balanced diet & follow a regular firness program

    High triglycerides increase the risk for which one of the following conditions?
    A)type II diabetes
    B)heart disease
    C)thyroid disease
    D)osteoporosis

    saturated fats found in animal products,such as bacon & cheese,are also called?
    A)cholesterol
    B)triglycerides
    C)lipids
    D)amino acids

    an elevated HDL is considered a?
    A)risk factor for osteoporosis
    B)risk factor for artritis
    C)less harmful form of cholesterol found in the boady
    D)more harmful form of cholesterol found in the body

    How can a person with lactose intolerance obtain dietary calcium?
    A)take a pill that helps to digest lactose
    B)eat green leafy vegetables,nuts,and enriched soy products
    C)eat lots of fresh shellfish
    D)eat lots of whole grains

    which of the following choices is most accurate about fat-soluble vitamin?
    A)they can cause gastric upset,diarrhea,and kidney stones
    B)they provide no risk of vitamin toxicity
    C)they can be stored in the body
    D)they help build collage & aid in healing

    The glycemic index predicts the way certain foods affect
    A)blood sugar levels
    B)weight loss
    C)excercise performance
    D)blood pressure

    what are the heath benefits of zinc?
    A)reduced muscle fatigue
    B)proper wound healing
    C)control of blood pressure
    D)lung efficiency

    which one of the following factors contributes to hypertension?
    A) A vegotous exercise regimen
    B) A lack of sleep
    C) A diet that lacks protein
    D) A high-fat diet

    which one of the following choices is the best option for vegan snack?
    A)Vanailla soymilk,peanut butter,& pretzels
    B)Almond milk with butter cookies
    C)Chocolate soymilk with angel food cake
    D)Tomato jucie & macaroni & cheese

    how should daily calorie intake be divided for an adult in good health?
    A)80% carbohydrates,20% proteins
    B)60% carbohydrates,40% proteins
    C)60% carbohydrates,30% fats,10% proteins
    D)80% proteins,10%carbohydrates,10% fats

    A person who is lactose intolerants would have difficulty digesting which one of the following foods?
    A)grilled veggie burg on a sesame bun
    B)low-fat cheesecake with rasberries
    C)turkey hot dog with mustard
    D)three-bean salad

    which one of the following choices is the most nutrient-dense snack?
    A)sliced bananas,walnuts,& orange sections
    B)baked potato chips & sparkling water
    C)green salad with ranch dressing
    D)unsalted pretzels & cheddar cheese

    To derive energy from food,you must eat foods that contain?
    A)vitamins & minerals
    B)carbohydrates,proteins,and fats
    C)water
    D)fiber

    which one of the following choices would be an acceptable small meal for a person who is gluten intolerant?
    A)microwave popcorn & carrot sticks
    B)peanut butter on whole-wheat toast
    C)bread sticks with low-fat dressing
    D)orange jucie & graham crackers

    • ANSWER:
      A lot of question to answer.

      Could do it, but that would deny you the chance to do some research.

      Also, would take me too long. Please do some research, and answer the questions yourself. You will be able to do it, and feel better in yourself for doing so, rather than copying answers, that could be wrong anyway.

  30. QUESTION:
    Can someone please help me with my homework….?
    One positive attribute of dietary fat is that it’s a good source of?
    A)water
    B)boron
    C)vitamin C
    D)energy

    Which one of the following choices is the best way to control Type II diabetes?
    A)Inject insulin
    B)Avoiding all simple sugars
    C)Adopting a healthy diet & excercising
    D)Avoiding salt

    which one of the following snacks provides all of the essential amino acids?
    A)Apple wedges & carrot sticks
    B)small bowl of chili beans & rice
    C)Corn on the cob
    D)Pasta salad with vinaigrette dressing

    which on of the following choices is the best way to build muscle bulk?
    A)use amino acid powders from a health food store
    B)eat more high-protein foods
    C)avoid vegetarian diets
    D)eat a healthy,balanced diet & follow a regular firness program

    High triglycerides increase the risk for which one of the following conditions?
    A)type II diabetes
    B)heart disease
    C)thyroid disease
    D)osteoporosis

    saturated fats found in animal products,such as bacon & cheese,are also called?
    A)cholesterol
    B)triglycerides
    C)lipids
    D)amino acids

    an elevated HDL is considered a?
    A)risk factor for osteoporosis
    B)risk factor for artritis
    C)less harmful form of cholesterol found in the boady
    D)more harmful form of cholesterol found in the body

    How can a person with lactose intolerance obtain dietary calcium?
    A)take a pill that helps to digest lactose
    B)eat green leafy vegetables,nuts,and enriched soy products
    C)eat lots of fresh shellfish
    D)eat lots of whole grains

    which of the following choices is most accurate about fat-soluble vitamin?
    A)they can cause gastric upset,diarrhea,and kidney stones
    B)they provide no risk of vitamin toxicity
    C)they can be stored in the body
    D)they help build collage & aid in healing

    The glycemic index predicts the way certain foods affect
    A)blood sugar levels
    B)weight loss
    C)excercise performance
    D)blood pressure

    what are the heath benefits of zinc?
    A)reduced muscle fatigue
    B)proper wound healing
    C)control of blood pressure
    D)lung efficiency

    which one of the following factors contributes to hypertension?
    A) A vegotous exercise regimen
    B) A lack of sleep
    C) A diet that lacks protein
    D) A high-fat diet

    which one of the following choices is the best option for vegan snack?
    A)Vanailla soymilk,peanut butter,& pretzels
    B)Almond milk with butter cookies
    C)Chocolate soymilk with angel food cake
    D)Tomato jucie & macaroni & cheese

    how should daily calorie intake be divided for an adult in good health?
    A)80% carbohydrates,20% proteins
    B)60% carbohydrates,40% proteins
    C)60% carbohydrates,30% fats,10% proteins
    D)80% proteins,10%carbohydrates,10% fats

    A person who is lactose intolerants would have difficulty digesting which one of the following foods?
    A)grilled veggie burg on a sesame bun
    B)low-fat cheesecake with rasberries
    C)turkey hot dog with mustard
    D)three-bean salad

    which one of the following choices is the most nutrient-dense snack?
    A)sliced bananas,walnuts,& orange sections
    B)baked potato chips & sparkling water
    C)green salad with ranch dressing
    D)unsalted pretzels & cheddar cheese

    To derive energy from food,you must eat foods that contain?
    A)vitamins & minerals
    B)carbohydrates,proteins,and fats
    C)water
    D)fiber

    which one of the following choices would be an acceptable small meal for a person who is gluten intolerant?
    A)microwave popcorn & carrot sticks
    B)peanut butter on whole-wheat toast
    C)bread sticks with low-fat dressing
    D)orange jucie & graham crackers

    • ANSWER:
      haha help, more like do it for you!

  31. QUESTION:
    Fitness And Nutrition?
    1. One positive attribute of dietary fat is that it’s a good
    source of
    A. water. C. vitamin C.
    B. boron. D. energy.
    2. Which one of the following choices is the best way to control
    Type II diabetes?
    A. Injecting insulin
    B. Avoiding all simple sugars
    C. Adopting a healthy diet and exercising
    D. Avoiding salt
    3. Which one of the following snacks provides all of the essential amino acids?
    A. Apple wedges and carrot sticks
    B. Small bowl of chili beans and rice
    C. Corn on the cob
    D. Pasta salad with vinaigrette dressing
    4. Which one of the following choices is the best way to build muscle bulk?
    A. Use amino acid powders from a health food store.
    B. Eat more high-protein foods.
    C. Avoid vegetarian diets.
    D. Eat a healthy, balanced diet and follow a regular fitness program.
    5. High triglycerides increase the risk for which one of the following conditions?
    A. Type II diabetes C. Thyroid disease
    B. Heart disease D. Osteoporosis
    6. Saturated fats found in animal products, such as bacon and cheese, are also called
    A. cholesterol. C. lipids.
    B. triglycerides. D. amino acids.
    7. An elevated HDL is considered a
    A. risk factor for osteoporosis.
    B. risk factor for arthritis.
    C. less harmful form of cholesterol found in the body.
    D. more harmful form of cholesterol found in the body.
    8. How can a person with lactose intolerance obtain dietary calcium?
    A. Take a pill that helps to digest lactose.
    B. Eat green leafy vegetables, nuts, and enriched soy products.
    C. Eat lots of fresh shellfish.
    D. Eat lots of whole grains.
    9. Which one of the following choices is most accurate about fat-soluble vitamins?
    A. They can cause gastric upset, diarrhea, and kidney stones.
    B. They provide no risk of vitamin toxicity.
    C. They can be stored in the body.
    D. They help build collagen and aid in healing.
    10. The glycemic index predicts the way certain foods affect
    A. blood sugar levels. C. exercise performance.
    B. weight loss.
    11. What are the health benefits of zinc?
    A. Reduced muscle fatigue C. Control of blood pressure
    B. Proper wound healing D. Lung efficiency
    12. Which one of the following factors contributes to hypertension?
    A. A vigorous exercise regimen C. A diet that lacks protein
    B. A lack of sleep D. A high-fat diet
    13. Which one of the following choices is the best option for a vegan snack?
    A. Vanilla soymilk, peanut butter, and pretzels
    B. Almond milk with butter cookies
    C. Chocolate soymilk with angel food cake
    D. Tomato juice and macaroni and cheese
    14. How should daily calorie intake be divided for an adult in good health?
    A. 80 percent carbohydrates, 20 percent proteins
    B. 60 percent carbohydrates, 40 percent proteins
    C. 60 percent carbohydrates, 30 percent fats, 10 percent proteins
    D. 80 percent proteins, 10 percent carbohydrates, 10 percent fats
    15. A person who is lactose intolerant would have difficulty digesting which one of the
    following foods?
    A. Grilled veggie burger on a sesame bun C. Turkey hot dog with mustard
    B. Low-fat cheesecake with raspberries D. Three-bean salad
    16. Which one of the following choices is the most nutrient-dense snack?
    A. Sliced bananas, walnuts, and orange sections
    B. Baked potato chips and sparkling water
    C. Green salad with ranch dressing
    D. Unsalted pretzels and cheddar cheese
    17. To derive energy from food, you must eat foods that contain
    A. vitamins and minerals. C. water.
    B. carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. D. fiber.
    18. Which one of the following choices is a simple sugar?
    A. Glucose C. Lactase
    B. Orange juice D. Chocolate
    19. Which one of the following snack combinations will best satisfy a person’s daily
    fluid requirements?
    A. Ice cream, sherbet, and fruit
    B. Bananas, whole-wheat bread, and water
    C. Fresh fruit, green salad, water
    D. Fruit juice, energy bars, cold cereal
    20 Which one of the following choices would be an acceptable small meal for a person
    who is gluten intolerant?
    A. Microwave popcorn and carrot sticks
    B. Peanut butter on whole-wheat toast
    C. Bread sticks with low-fat dressing
    D. Orange juice and graham crackers

    • ANSWER:
      1 d
      2.c
      3.b
      4.d
      5.b
      6.b
      7.d
      8.b
      9.c
      10.a
      11.b
      12.b
      13.d
      14.c
      15.b
      16.a
      17.a
      18.b
      19.c
      20.b

      alright… i hope i did well!

  32. QUESTION:
    biology questions help :) ?
    How do human bodies respond to changes inside them and to their environment?
    1. What does the nervous system enable humans to do?
    2. What does a receptor detect?
    3. Where are the receptors, which are sensitive to changes in the position of our body and to help us keep our balance?
    4. What are receptors on the tongue sensitive to?
    5. What three stimuli are receptors in the skin sensitive to?
    6. How does information from receptors pass to the brain?
    7. What does the brain decide from the information it receives?
    8. What are automatic, rapid responses to stimuli called?
    9. What are the names of the three types of neurone involved in this response?
    10. What structures in the body respond to the impulses sent by a motor neurone? (notes)
    11. What is the name of the chemical substances that coordinate many processes in the body?
    12. What produces these chemicals?
    13. How do they get to the organs that they will affect (the target organ)?
    14. What two ways does the body lose water?
    15. Through which organ does the body lose excess water? What substance is it lost in?
    16. What temperature does the body need to be maintained at? Why?
    17. Why do blood sugar levels need to be controlled?
    18. Which two hormones are involved in promoting the release of an egg in the menstrual cycle?
    19. Which gland is FSH secreted by, and where can the gland be found?
    20. What two actions does FSH cause?
    21. Which structures secrete oestrogen?
    22. What two actions does oestrogen have on the body?
    23. What action do the hormones in oral contraceptives have?
    24. What action has FSH when given as a ‘fertility drug’?
    What can we do to keep our bodies healthy?
    1. What two things does a healthy diet contain?
    2. What word describes diseases that you might get with an unhealthy diet?
    3. What word describes people who eat an unbalanced diet?
    4. What two conditions mean that you need less food?
    5. What is your metabolic rate?
    6. What three things make this vary?
    7. What two factors in the developed world are leading to high levels of obesity?
    8. What are the diseases linked to excess weight?
    9. What does processed food often contain high proportions of?
    10. Where is cholesterol made?
    11. Where is cholesterol found?
    12. What do high levels of cholesterol in the blood cause?
    13. What does the amount of cholesterol made by the liver depend on?
    14. What is cholesterol carried around the body by?
    15. Which lipoproteins carry ‘bad’ cholesterol?
    16. What do these cause?
    17. Which lipoproteins are ‘good’ cholesterol?
    18. What can too much salt in the diet cause for about 30% of the population?
    19. What type of fats increase cholesterol levels?
    20. What two actions do mono-unsaturated and polyunsaturated fats have?
    How do we use/abuse medical and recreational drugs?
    1. What are many drugs made (derived) from?
    2. When scientists develop new drugs, what has to happen to them?
    3. What are drugs tested in the laboratory for?
    4. What are they trialled on humans for?
    5. Why is the impact of legal drugs on health much greater than the impact of illegal drugs?
    6. What was the drug thalidomide developed for?
    7. What effect did it cause in pregnant women?
    8. What were the unknown side effects of the drug on pregnant women?
    9. What is thalidomide used to treat now?
    10. What action do drugs have on people’s bodies?
    11. If people become dependent or addicted to the drug what do they suffer if they stop taking the drug?
    12. What two drugs are very addictive?
    13. What is the addictive substance in tobacco smoke?
    14. What is a carcinogen? (notes)
    15. What gas does tobacco smoke contain that affects a foetus?
    16. How does this gas affect the blood of the mother?
    17. What two effects does this have on the foetus?
    18. How does alcohol affect the nervous system?
    19. How does too much alcohol affect the body?
    20. What organs are damaged by drinking too much alcohol?
    What causes infectious diseases and how can our bodies defend themselves against them?
    1. What are micro-organisms that cause infectious diseases called?
    2. What happens to bacteria and viruses when they get inside the body?
    3. When do viruses damage our cells?
    4. Which blood cells help to defend us against pathogens?
    5. What three things do they do to help us?
    6. What is an antibiotic?
    7. How do antibiotics work?
    8. Why can antibiotics not be used to kill viral pathogens?
    9. Why is it difficult to develop drugs which kill viruses?
    10. How can people be immunised against disease?
    11. What cells do vaccines stimulate?
    12. What chemicals do these cells produce?
    13. What do these chemicals do?
    14. Why is the body then immune to future infections by that micro-organism?
    15. What does the MMR vaccine protect children against?
    thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      ok… You cannot be serious!

      I will only do a few…

      1. Respond to stimuli in the environment
      2. Stimuli (?)
      3. in the ears (or just behind)
      4. taste (chemicals)

      6. Sensory neurone
      7. how to respond
      8. reflexes
      9. Sensory -> Relay -> Motor
      10. effectors (muscles, glands etc)
      11. hormones

      13. bloodstream
      14. sweating, breathing (water vapour)
      15. bladder – urine

      18. FSH and LH
      19. Pituitary gland
      20. matures the egg and stimulates the release of oestrogen
      21. ovaries?
      22. builds the lining of the womb and stimulates the release of LH

      24. matures the egg

      That’s the first lot – do you want the rest??

  33. QUESTION:
    Best way to lose about 30lbs?
    First: I want to lose about 30 lbs and keep it off. I wouldn’t want to lose any more than that. My current weight is 160 lbs. I already have a gym membership and I am in fairly good shape as far as cardio stamina goes, but I’m not very strong. Is 6 months a reasonable amount of time to lose 30 lbs?

    Second: Currently, I go to the gym 6 or 7 days a week. I do 20 – 30 minutes of cardio (usually eliptical) and 10-15 minutes of weights (arms one day, legs another). I am not feeling very challenged and I’m not losing any weight of course. What can I do to actually lose weight? I can spend more time than just 45 minutes if that helps. Which machines would be best to use and for how long – and which weight machines will help tone my body? I want to lose inches and build a little muscle as well.

    Third: As far as eating habits, I have hypoglycemia and was advised to eat every two hours to keep my blood sugar under control. What types of food do you suggest for someone who is trying to lose weight? I usually eat snacks high in protein because they help keep me full and my blood sugar level steady. I can’t eat plain fruit as a snack – it would have to be with something, and I can’t eat most carbs – they have to be complex. The protein bars or drinks that I see in the store have too much sugar in them for me to eat. What are some filling meals/snacks that will fill me up and keep my blood sugar steady?

    I’m sorry for the multitude of questions, I just need a plan in mind. Thank you for any help you can offer me.

    • ANSWER:
      1)I don’t know what your height is as you didn’t mention, but your target seems quite reasonable to me.
      2)An easy and cheap way to lose weight would be by walking. Walk at least an hour every day at moderate pace. If the weather conditions in your area are not good walk for two hours three days a week. This helped me loose 10lbs over a two month period without having to cut down on food (and trust me, I used to eat a lot!).
      3)As for any diet changes you’d like to make, I think you’d better discuss that with a nutritionist!

  34. QUESTION:
    With it being the way it is?
    With it being the way it is, I find it very different, I don’t act my age, I am 39, but I act like I am still 30, I don’t even look my age , I look like I am 50, but that is because of Acromegaly Causes
    Hormones are chemicals that control important body functions such as metabolism, growth and development, and reproduction. Growth hormone, like a number of hormones, is produced by the pituitary gland. It is one in a series of hormones that control tissue growth
    .. Levels of growth hormone and related hormones also are affected by sleep, exercise, stress, food intake, and blood sugar levels.

    Too much IGF-1 causes the bone growth that leads to changes in physical appearance and function

    .. It causes thickening of soft tissues such as skin, tongue, and muscles. Enlargement of the tongue can lead to breathing problems and sleep apnea. Overgrowth of muscles can entrap nerves, causing pain syndromes such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

    In more than 95% of cases of acromegaly, the excess growth hormone is produced by a tumor of the pituitary gland called adenoma

    Acromegaly Overview
    Acromegaly is a serious condition that occurs when the body produces too much of the hormones that control growth.

    .. The hormone most often affected is called growth hormone, or GH. It is produced by the pituitary gland, a tiny organ at the base of the brain.

    ..

    .. Growth hormone promotes growth of bone, cartilage, muscle, organs, and other tissues.

    ..

    .. When there is too much growth hormone in the body, these tissues grow larger than normal. This excessive growth can cause serious disease and even premature death.

    So you see that is why I am the way I am,, but still I hang out at the pool hall, I hang around youth, 19 to 25 years old, but still it is not me, I shouldn’t do that, maybe a vote should be put into place,

    Should I hang out with the younger crowd, I would love to date again, but as with what I explained above, who the hell would have a man at any age, that looks like he 50 years old, and I am not talking about dating a younger person either,

    I don’t think anyone reads my blogs no way so why should I write this , no one understands, it seems like everyone knows where to go, and people have money

    Any ways just how I feel

    Need to put it to a vote I thinks

    • ANSWER:
      Hang out with the people you are more comfortable with. If you feel like you are about 30, then that would be about the age group that you would need to be around. The ones your own age may be intimidating or more mature, which would not make you as comfortable. When you become comfortable with yourself with your medical problems, then it will be easier to socialize with others. It would take a good woman to understand you and to like you, which is what you want anyway, so your problem is filtering out many of the ones who are not worth it anyway. It is a blessing in disguise for you in that aspect. If it is meant to be for you to find that special someone, then it will happen. But it is nothing you should try to rush. Try to be patient with it. Live one day at a time and stop worrying about what may or may not be. Either it is going to happen or not, it is not doing a bit of good to worry about it.

  35. QUESTION:
    How Can I Control My Type 1 Diabetes?
    Iv bin a diabetic since i was 1 years old and up untill a year ago i had no problems, but now i cant seem to control it at all. My blood sugar levels are either really high or really low no matter wot i do i cant seem to get my insulin right. When i went to see my diabetic doctor he said that only i can know how much insulin i should have with what i eat. Is there any sort of book that can tell me how much insulin to have with wot foods i eat? I could really do with the help.

    • ANSWER:
      I’m sorry you’re having such a hard time getting someone to pay attention to you! The unfortunate fact is that you have to be the one to stay on top of this, but you’re going to need some help. Call your doctor’s office and tell them you need to be referred to a Diabetes Educator. They may have one at your doctor’s office if he is an endocrinologist (diabetes doctor), or they may have one at a local hospital. A Diabetes Educator can sit down with you and really analyze your numbers to help you figure out patterns so you can make adjustments. They will help teach you how to take control of things and make decisions for yourself to stay in better control. Here’s a directory if you have trouble finding one:

      https://www.diabeteseducator.org/DiabetesEducation/Find.html

  36. QUESTION:
    Gestational Diabetes?
    i will be eight months pregnant this friday and everything is going perfectly fine, except for my gestational diabetes. i can’t keep it controlled to save my life, and it’s not like i’m not trying. i went for my first visit with the diabetes dietician, which was just a meeting to explain gestional diabetes, precautionary measures, etc. i go for my second meeting with the actual nutritionist monday to determine whether or not diet alone is controlling it, or if i need to be put on insulin, which obviously i will have to be. i’ve been following the sheet that the dietician gave with the the food “do’s and don’ts” and i also cut out all sweets and drink only water, with that being said, my blood sugar levels remain high. i have to check my sugar four times a day…in the morning before i eat anything, and then after every meal. i eat my snacks in between meals as well, as i am supposed to. my sugar seems to be fine when i test it first thing in the morning, it’s supposed to be between 60-95, and mine normally runs 70-100. but, for some reason after that, it goes up and stays up. if i check it one hour after i eat, it’s supposed <140 and if i wait two hours, it's supposed to be <120, well after two hours mine stays between 135-150. Saturday, it even went as high as 215, and it steadily went down after it spiked. beings that it was so high, i called the dr on call and was told that they would call me back shortly. well, that was a 4:30pm on Saturday...and at 10:30am Monday morning, they have yet to call me back...i thought this was a serious matter, but obviously i was wrong. i know i won't know exactly what to do as far as controlling it until i go and see the nutritionist, but i was just curious as to if anybody else had had this problem and could give me a little advice/peace of mind until i go. thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      Hiya,
      I’m currently 35 weeks with my second child and have been diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes too. I expected to have it this time, as I had it when I was expecting my son in 2009. I’m having so much trouble keeping my sugar levels normal as well. The diet doesn’t seem to keep it down, yet sometimes it just drops for no reason! My dietitian has given me Metformin to make my body more sensitive to my natural insulin – however I don’t think it’s working. I keep going lightheaded and dizzy, and I’m always hungry because the diet just simply isn’t enough. I’m hoping they may induce me at 36-37 weeks, as I’m so uncomfortable anyway and my baby is getting rather chunky!

      I wouldn’t worry too much about them not calling you back, GD isn’t generally too serious, except that your baby could be getting a rounded tummy! As long as you feel ‘generally’ ok in yourself, and you can still feel baby moving plenty, just continue doing the finger pricks as requested. At least you tried to call them, so you made an effort and did the right thing by trying to inform them! :-)

      Good luck and I hope everything goes well with the rest of your pregnancy and birth!

      xxxxx

  37. QUESTION:
    ketones and pregnancy?
    I am 28 weeks pregnant. Due April 25th. This is my 3rd pregnancy and never had this problem.

    Last week I failed my glucose test

    1 hour 147

    Went back in to do a fasting 3 hour test

    Fasting 96
    1 hour 214
    2 hour 179
    3 hour 149

    So now they have me on a diet. 3 meals 3 snacks Counting my carbs grams and meat in take. I check my blood sugar levels during the day and my keytones levels when I wake up. I am doing good with the sugar levels I have problems before dinner and the 2 hour test after dinner some times. But the past two mornings I have failed my keytones test. With high levels as dark as the strip can get.

    Keytones this is what I know about them
    Ketones are produced when your body gets energy by breaking down fat instead of sugar.
    Ketones become a problem when you do not have enough insulin to control ketone production properly or you are truly starving because of lack of food. When too many ketones are produced too quickly they upset the delicate balance of the body’s chemistry and can lead to a problem called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

    My question is what is the next step? What will they have me do, or is there any more test coming up? Just a little curious want more info. I am posting this in two groups pregnancy and health. I do eat what my diet tells me to the t. I am a little ocd about following rules so I know I am doing it right.
    Thank you for all the help!
    I am calling the Dr in the AM and going in Tuesday.

    • ANSWER:
      When my son gets ketones the Dr. tells him to drink lots of water. You should tell the Dr. if you have 2 high tests in a row.If you get DKA you have to be hospitalized.

  38. QUESTION:
    I binged today, feeling horrible, just need some support and advice…?
    So I didn’t eat for approximately 112 hours, and I limited my water intake to 50ml in the morning and 50ml in the evening with my medication. I got dehydrated and had to go to hospital in an ambulence last night, my blood sugar levels were 1.3, so i had to have some glucose sugar gel then had to have saline and sodium chloride and glucose pumped into me in an IV, i was at the hospital for about 4 hours and once i was rehydrated they let me go.
    I was so hungry and craving food that today I gave in and ate. I hate 4 weetbix with sugar and milk, 1 jam sandwhich, a bit if beef barragundy, then later on i had 2 cheeseburgers, 1 oreo milkshake and large fries from mcdonalds. I feel so pysichally sick from all the food and I just cried and cried, I talked to a nurse (im in an extended treatment resedential psych facility) and they gave me some vailum to help calm me. but that hasnt helped. I feel like I’ve lost all my control, and gained all the weight I had lost back. But they won’t let me weigh myself because they know if i do and if it’s a gain then i will become very upset and may act on suicidal thoughts (thats how much weight changes the way i feel). I used to have an eating disorder for 2 years, anorexia and bulimia and got down to about 34kgs. Now I’m a normal weight but am relapsing back into my ED. I’ve been fasting for long periods of time and restricting my water intake, then i binge and the cycle starts again. I feel very suicidal and I just want to end it all. Starving myself and dehydrating myself makes me feel in control and also it’s a slow way of dying, its a descrete way too. But im already in a psych hospital so the nurses do my obs daily and if my pulse, blood pressure and heart rate are too high when i stand up then they know ive been dehydrated. and even if you dont eat breakfast, lunch or dinner you have to sit in the dining room while everyone else does and if you refuse to you have to go in time out, so i sit there watching everyone else eat and seeing and smelling the food is unbearable. so this morning i just told myself im gonna give up this fast, beside i had like a litre of glucose IVed into me last night which has calories, so i ate and ate and ate and now i want to kill myself for it.

    Sorry if it seems like i’m making such a huge deal out of something so significant, but i deal with my emotions and problems through starving, and binging and purging. I purged lunch but haven’t purged dinner because the nurses already know that I do that and they’ll be too suspicious. I just want to die so badly, im 16 if that makes any difference, the last thing my mother said to me on the phone on Tuesday was “I will be so relieved once I get the phone call that you have commited suicide”and hung up. I haven’t talked to her sense. She wouldnt even let me come home this weekend for weekend leave because last weekend I did ecstasy for the first time and when i came back to the ward i was drug tested and they told my mum. Thats besides the point, i just need some support.. something. i just feel completely hopeless and the guilt is unbearable.

    • ANSWER:

  39. QUESTION:
    Pcos which is best?
    if i have pcos and knowing that it can be controlled and made better through diet control,regarding weight loss i know that the GI diet and having low sugar or sutting out refined carbs is advised,but in regards to the wight loss could i still just eat low fat sugar diet and less calories and lose weight? All my friends who have lost weight have just eaten less,i was thinking of eating little and often and not follow what my friend did,as she has been very stressed as she is going through case with social services with her children at mo,so she has just had reduced appetite,and also wanted to lose weight,she was sometimes only having breakfast and then just having a eve meal,or no breakfast at all and eat maybe the odd thing otherwise just eating one meal in the eve,admitidly she lost weight and looks good,but not sure how healthy this is to do,plus i know i could not go all day without food,think this would also be cause of my blood sugar levels and insulin probs due to the pcos
    But is this true even if you are not gaining anymore weight,that i still deserve more help from GP? he has briefly mentioned metformin/not sure what other medicine in uk is equivalent to this or other types,but we do have metformin,my weight is because i also eat badly well over lifetime,not exercised enough,but also cause the effect the pcos has on my body,and problems it causes,also makes weight loss harder,plus i have bad skin,of which he has tried me on a pill i’ve already had before a year ago.i was just taking it then for contraceptive reasons,and we didn’t know i had pcos then. He says it may help with the hormone inbalance?! But am scared about weight gain and acne getting worse as the pill can do this,but have only got 3mth trial then going back to him. In line with taking something for insulin probs and to help weightloss,what else would they implement with this? Eg diet/other advise or necessary things to do whilst taking met or other

    • ANSWER:
      you should be getting more help than this, i was prescribed metformin and orlistat and lost 4 stones. my gynacologist said that because of the pcos i had more insulin in my body than a bodybuilder would use to bulk up!!
      see your doctor and say auntie rachel said, help me more.
      as you probably know all about the condition one of the problems is carb cravings. if someone’s trying to give up smoking they are prescribed nrt thus for our condition we should receive equivalent support.

  40. QUESTION:
    What blood glucose level constitutes an emergency?
    Ever since I was a young teen, I’ve struggled with PCOS with frequent bouts of hypoglycemia (that diet never could control) and, now that I’m 43, it looks like this has finally crossed over to diabetes as my doctor predicted it would. My blood sugar last night after a vegetarian dinner was 359. I haven’t eaten anything since, more than 12 hours, and it’s still a whooping 258. So it’s going down but very, very slowly.

    My question is, at what level does high blood sugar become an emergency? I think I can wait to call my doctor on Monday. Tonight, I’ll simply eat ultra low carb foods like green beans and mushrooms.

    Please don’t give me lectures about diet and exercise. I’m a strict vegan so I eat healthy and I exercise regularly. My condition is caused from my genes not from my diet and neither diet nor exercise has ever kept this condition in check. I’ve suffered greatly from it most of my life.
    This is the first time my blood sugar has ever gone this high and I’m not on medication or insulin for it. I was once on Glucophage for my PCOS, but it caused lactic acidosis so I had to discontinue it. I’m currently not being treated for diabetes nor has it been diagnosed. Obviously though, I now have diabetes.

    • ANSWER:
      Lucille – With Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) about 30%-80% of women have insulin resistance which can result in diabetes. As you know, both low blood glucose (BG) level, usually below 60 can result in hypoglycemia and even shock while high BG levels (usually above 600) can lead to coma and death.
      You probably know that there are ways to become less insulin resistant. For example:
      Increase exercise. Exercise is proven to reduce insulin problems.
      Improve your diet.
      Switch from refined carbohydrates to a complex carbohydrate, low glycemic diet
      High ratio of soluble fiber to insoluble fiber.
      Improve quality of fat
      Avoid saturated fat
      Avoid trans fats
      Increase monosaturated oils
      Increase omega 3 oils (fish, flax).
      Smaller, more frequent meals.
      Reduce alcohol intake.
      Have mixed meals of carbohydrate, protein and fat.

      You are wise to see your doctor tomorrow. Meanwhile, do as you plan and reduce carbohydrates, especially simple ones which rapidly cause blood sugar to rise.

  41. QUESTION:
    Is it a good idea to take the 3 hour glucose test, AGAIN?
    My doctor had me take the three hour glucose test, two weeks later at my doctors appointment she says I have Gestational Diabetes (Even saying WOW high sugar).. After two weeks of freaking out, dieting waiting for my next appointment so they can explain what to do or how to control GD.. I get to my new “high risk” appointment where they tell me that they had mixed up one of my tests with somebody else and it doesn’t look like I have GD at all!!!! The doctor said the first two blood sugar levels don’t match the last one and they think the blood test was mixed up.. Now they want me to take a second three hour test (which I really don’t wanna do) just to confirm I don’t have it.
    My question is after all the inconvenience, stress, money to buy super healthy food, plus Im only 20 and feeling GREAT… Should I have to go back and take another 3 hour test????
    Also Im 32 weeks and the baby is the complete right size (I had to get another ultrasound to check)
    :-P grr
    By the way the lady taking my blood samples was a total JOKE, she was talking on her phone asking her friend if she could pass a drug test so she could get a job with her… Also I asked my husband to go look for something I thought I let and realized I had it and the lady called me a bitch!

    • ANSWER:

  42. QUESTION:
    Diet & fitness poll on snacking: good or bad?
    I’ve heard both sides to the story many times.

    On one hand, snacking may be recommended for individuals whom are trying to lose weight or maintain weight, because it prevents eating larger amounts of foods at general meal times. Also tends to keep blood sugar levels normal, among many other things.

    On the other hand, there’s frequently talk that Western society is facing a “snacking epidemic” with snacking getting “out of control”, that we should be only consuming 3 meals per day and to do more than that (even if it’s the same amount of calories spread out over 5-6 smaller meals) is considered abnormal / to lead to binging / to lead to a focus of life around food.

    What’s YOUR OPINION on snacking. Good or bad? Why? Do YOU snack—healthy or unhealthy?

    • ANSWER:
      Well there’s the thing snacking unhealthy is what is leading people to get overweight. You need food to keep your metabolism on the right track. Healthy snacking is good. I snack healthy so i can keep my metabolism up and yes it helps with craving you get.

  43. QUESTION:
    My diabetic dad is diagonsed as having artherosclorosis, need immediate HELP!!?
    recently discovered that my dad is having artherosclorosis.
    He is diabetic too. were surprised as he was a fitness freak – into yoga, all these years..until past 6-8 months he ignored his health that shooted up his cholestrol along with his blood sugar levels. fortunately we detected in time (CT scan) the doctors said that there is plaque buildup in his arteries , but nothing has affected his main arteries.so ruled out for surgery (by-pass).But the doctors have recommended him to cautious..be on low-fat, low-sodium diet. I want to ask the experts here and want them elaborate – 1)How to control this disease
    2)what type of food needs to be consumed..( how much serving of fish, poulty, vegetables).
    3)Quantity of fluids.(fruits), any supplements
    4)How much physical activity (exercise in a day).
    5)Can consume alcohol like red wine to reduce his cholestrol levels
    6)should he consume black/green tea to reduce the risk of any heart disease.
    any additional info will really benefit.Thnx

    • ANSWER:
      cooljs,

      This is not a result of the last 6-8 months. If his arteries have detecable plaques in them, then they have been developing for a very long time. That’s the way we are when we eat like Americans. We’ve really known this since Viet Nam, when we found that healthy young men of 20 years old had detecable fatty plaques in their arteries. But since we like to eat a lot, and like fatty foods, we just haven’t been paying attention.

      So don’t blame your dad’s last half a year. Generally, if we’re American males, we have heart disease. It’s just not bad when we’re young.

      Now, what can he do?

      His doctors are right. Low fat is the way to go.

      Start looking up Dr. Dean Ornish on the internet. You can get some of his information starting tonight and learn what your dad must do. Then you can look up the information on Vegsource.com for further info on a low-fat diet (they recommend a vegan diet, I think, but please don’t go that far. On a vegan website I saw an ad recently that said,”92% of vegans suffer from vitamin B12 deficiency.” Well, doesn’t that tell us that something is wrong with the vegan diet, then?) which will help quite a bit.

      Then get Dean Ornish’s book, “Everyday Cooking With Dr Dean Ornish” and start cooking with that.

      It’s easier to get, I think, than is “The Moosewood Collective’s Low Fat Cookbook” which is excellent, and if you can find it, I actually recommend it even more than I do Ornish’s. there are other ones, too. And a whole raft of recipes at Vegweb.com and Recipezaar, but make sure that at Recipezaar you get the low-fat ones. No butter.

      OK, let’s take your questions:

      1. Which disease, diabetes or heart disease? If you mean heart, then as much cardio exercise as he can tolerate. Start with walking and over the next few months progress to jogging. Without knowng his exact condition I can’t say more than that. Have him consult with his physician about this.

      Then have his eat right.

      2. Do not cook with any oil. Not any oil or fat at all. No butter, no olive, no canola, nothing. Saute onions in water and do not fry anything. Boil, grill, roast, bake, but do not fry. Bake cakes with applesauce and not oil. Bake bread (you don’t bake your own bread? You have missed one of the truly sublime moments in life, taking out of the oven a fresh loaf of what you have made yourself and cutting into it and letting yourself fall into a moment of heaven. I always bake two loaves because half of one of them will not survive half an hour out of the oven) with extra gluten flour in it instead of salt or oil.

      Meat? One piece the size of a deck of cards once a day at most. Most of the time we don’t need to eat meat at all (it’s been years since I’ve had any, and I run 20 miles a week). No red meat, chicken is ok, but fish is best.

      And have him take fish oil capsules, 3-4 grams a day of fish oil. His heart will absorb the EPA and DHA (long names, never mind. They are essential to his heart’s health, though, and are part of the reason I’m still alive. My heart stopped a few times and restarted partly because of fish oil). Fish oil raises HDL (“good” cholesterol).

      But he must eat a diet rich in vegetables. Any vegetable he likes he can and should eat.

      Go easy on the fruits because of his diabetes.

      3. No supplements, really. Oh, a good multivitamin won’t hurt, but vitamins only really help if we are deficient, which we westerners usually aren’t. But if he eats a good diet, there’s no supplement that will help, other than fish oil. Whatever fruits he can have with his diabetes will be a help to him.

      4. Physical activity we’ve talked about. The more, the better, as long as he goes gently for a couple of months and increases his exertion slowly and always under a doctor’s orders.

      5. Sadly, the wine won’t help him. It isn’t the wine that helps, it’s a substance in it called “resveratrol,” a substance the grape produces in response to a fungus attack on it. No fungus, no resveratrol. And resveratrol is very volatile. Open the bottle, and 8 hours later it’s all gone even if the wine is not touched. So red wine can be a help, but usually won’t be. The low-fat vegetable diet and exercise and fish oil will help a lot more than red wine possible can.

      6. Tea will help, black or green. Apparently green helps a little more than black, but either will do.

      He must keep his diet very strictly, for his health depends on it. And while he may not like it at first, he will get used to it, and if he starts out by going into the low-fat diet with everything he has–don’t start out by doing a little just to see if you like it–he’ll be used to it by the time three months have passed, and after six months, he’ll actually like it.

      It might help if you did it with him. My father was a Marine Corp combat infantry officer, and he said that it was always easier to get people to obey if you said, “Come with me,” and not “Go take that hill.” Go with him and eat as he does. If he’s important to you–of course he is–it’ll be worth it.

  44. QUESTION:
    Pre-diabetic… advice on controlling it?
    I got my test results back from my doc, and my fasting glucose level was in the pre-diabetic range. I do have diabetes (type 2 I’m assuming) in my family’s history.

    Usually with pre-diabetics, the advice is to lose weight. Well, I’m 5’5″ and 120 lbs, so I don’t have much to lose! Other than the obvious of toning down refined sugars, is there anything else I can do? Are there foods that support blood glucose levels?

    Also, I looove fruit smoothies. I make them with fresh fruits and don’t add sugar or milk or yogurt. I also really like dried fruit. Will fruit make my sugar levels spike?
    Yan: Thanks for the info. I’m not on insulin, as I’ve not been diagnosed diabetic but in the pre-diabetic range. I’m absolutely horrified of needles (just getting the blood test that gave me this information was an ordeal!), and at 29 years old I want to nip this in the bud so I never need to!

    I don’t eat mostly fruit, but I have an easier time with fruit than with veggies. I’ve discovered that I can eat anything if it’s in a smoothie (even cactus!). I know I don’t get enough exercise, though. I’m so low energy all the time that it’s hard, plus I faint easily. =( That’s part of the reason my diet has been so bad… I’m just SO run down that taking time to prepare a healthy meal is often more than I can manage.

    • ANSWER:
      At your weight, I would suggest getting antibody tests as well as a C-peptide test. You may be developing type 1 diabetes.

      If it turns out that you really are (don’t let a doctor tell you you are, demand blood testing) a typical pre-type2, arm yourself with information.

      The first thing you need is a prescription for a blood glucose meter so you can test your levels at home. This gives you instant feedback about how different things impact your blood sugar.

      Second, as you know, work on eating balanced meals with moderate amounts of complex carbs and plenty of protein, veggies, so on. Obviously, don’t try to reduce your calories or lose weight. And, yes, fruit can raise your blood glucose level as it, like almost all foods, contains carbs. That doesn’t mean you can’t have them, but it does mean that moderation is important.

      Third, work out! This can do wonders in controlling blood glucose levels as well as making you plain old healthier in general.

      You may want to seek out one of the many online diabetes forums or community, as they are a source of information, as well as support and encouragement.

  45. QUESTION:
    How can I get my diabetes under control?
    Please give me some help. I really need it. I keep going to doctor after doctor for help with my diabetes and compulsive food habits. No one really seems to be listening to me and all they do is try new medications on me and tell me to eat healthy.

    firstly, I do eat healthy.
    Everyday I have a healthy balalnced lunch of carbohydrates, protein and vegetables. Dinner is the same.

    It is in between that things go pear shaped.

    I crave chocolate inbetween every meal and find myself always thinking about food. Today I ate my lunch. But then I had to go out and buy 3 bars of chocolate which are all gone now. This is playing havoc with my blood sugar levels.

    I’ve tried to buy blocks of choc and eat in moderation but the whole block is gone in under 15minutes.

    The other day i tried the same with nutella. But yet again, I had eaten a 400g jar with a spoon in 1 hour. It tastes disgusting and sickly sweet but I just cant stop.

    Does anyone have any answers to how i can stop?

    • ANSWER:
      Chocolate? Aw… I don’t blame you. I love it, too!
      This is summer… enjoy your life!!!!!! In summer lots of activities and free events everywhere… I will give you some websites to explore, OK! If you have lots of activities, you may not crave so much for food. This is my own experience.

      I am sorry, actually I can’t really give you the websites since I don’t know where you live, dear! However, I am very sure, every city has special events in summer. SO START THIS PROJECT IN SUMMER. Probably going to the local library. That’s what I did. I offered myself to be a volunteer, like putting back the books on the shelves… anything they may need your help. This will give you a sense of satisfaction. You feel good about yourself!!! Besides, you will make new friends who may give more informations about other activities. You can bring your lunch to the library or to the park, and read or do something in the library. You won’t believe that time goes fast… it would be dinner time already… (Hey… you just missed your “snack” time!!!)

      Avoid TV!!!!! I eat a lot in front tof TV and I couldn’t keep track on what I eat… just eat…eat..eat… Come on! It’s summer be outdoors… before nasty weather prevents you from being outside. After dinner, when the temperature is not too hot, go for a walk along the neighborhood or go to the nearby park. Enjoy yourself!!!

      I wish I could know where you live, so I could provide you with some websites for your interesting local events.

      Another thing you may want to try. I did this. Everyday, I wrote down everything that got into my mouth, even water. Keeping a journal of what I eat made my craving more controllable. If I saw the “progress” (it means if I eat less of something I shouldn’t eat) I felt so good about myself and gave myself a star for every certain food I was not supposed to eat. I was trying to motivate myself by giving a special treat (such as getting a ticket to a theater, or buy a new book, or buy something nice for myself) if I received 5 stars in a week. Well… what do you think?

      Once in a long while, I let myself gloriously have a piece of chocolate candy bar (low fat). I don’t buy candy bars anymore… I can’t afford the temptation….

      Well.. good luck! I know you can do it… It’s hard but it’s worthwhile… if you can tell me the city where you live, I will give you the websites for the summer events.

  46. QUESTION:
    Should I stop being worried about having diabetes?
    I was in the hospital for 5 days back in April. They constantly drew blood for test because they didn’t know what I had, but they said my white blood cells were high, which meant my body was fighting an infection. At the time they told me my blood sugar (I had been fasting for 3 days) was at 117. And I was at about 310 pounds.

    After getting out of the hospital I watched what I ate and drank lots of water. But I eventually slipped back to bad habits of being too sedentary and not eating healthy foods. At my heaviest I weight 314.

    In late June I joined a gym and started eating healthier. I’m currently at about 286 pounds. But I was afraid that I might have gotten diabetes in those month between being in the hospital and finally loosing weight. Last Thursday I saw my doctor and they poked my finger and drew blood to check my cholesterol and blood sugar. I had been fasting for probably more than 12 hours. When they poked my finger it came back at 86. Then I got my results this Monday and they said my cholesterol level was normal, but my good cholesterol was a little bit lower than normal. And my glucose result came back at 80. My doctor said I didn’t have diabetes. He said that I probably reached 117 in April because that happens when a person is sick or has an infection. But the doctors at the hospital didn’t clear that up for me though. So I thought it was normally that high.

    I’m just concerned because I keep thinking that maybe it’s just because I turned my life around and maybe it’s just that I’m “controlling” diabetes and that’s why my blood sugar is normal. I know I might just be over thinking things because my 17 year old brother was told he had type 2 diabetes. He is 2 years younger than me, has always weight less, and is much taller than me. I just though that if he could get it, my chances were much higher.

    A nurse said that if I was diabetic my levels would come much higher than 80.

    Is it possible for a diabetic who has good control over their blood sugar to have a good level if they have blood drawn while fasting? Or would it still come back higher? And how much higher?

    Sometimes I feel like I might have the symptoms, but it might have to do with the fact that I’m worried and always reading info about diabetes because I’m trying to learn as much as possible to help my brother.

    I’m still going to keep eating healthy, working out, and losing weight. I just don’t want to go on living thinking I don’t have diabetes and then find out I had it for a while and didn’t know it.

    • ANSWER:

  47. QUESTION:
    Cat has a really sensitive back?
    This is a strange question..but for about the last year, my cat has had a very sensitive back. When you pet it..and get to about the middle, he raises his head and looks back. Sometimes he’ll start scratching when you touch his back..similar to what dogs do when you find that “spot.” Well..today I gave him a pet..and he meowed really loudly and looked back as if it hurt.

    I’m not sure if this has anything to do with it, but he has feline diabetes..and we’ve been able to control it through a proper diet (a half a can of cat food in the morning..half at night).. so he’s no longer on insulin and his blood sugar level is fine. However..we’ve noticed that he’s gotten really skinny. He’s a really big cat…very long..but now he only weighs about 11 pounds. Before his diet he was 14. We’ve been asking the vet on his checkups if he’s underweight..but they brush it off and say no. I’ve noticed as of late..his spine kind of.. sticks out..just a bit..as if he’s too skinny and his ribs are showing.

    Could this be the problem maybe? Like I said..his spine sticks out a bit..maybe that’s the cause of his back being so sensitive? Also, do you think he’s underweight? 11 pounds probably sounds fine..but like I said..he’s an incredibly big cat.

    Any feedback is appreciated..thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      It may be simply that he likes to be rubbed there very much and that is why he reacts as he does.

      The thing the that jumped out at me when I read your question was “.. so he’s no longer on insulin and his blood sugar level is fine. However..we’ve noticed that he’s gotten really skinny.”

      How do you know that his “blood sugar level is fine?” Are you using a glucometer (glucose meter) to measure it once or twice a day? And – there is no single blood glucose level. In a health animal, the level goes up and down. When the animal eats, the level goes ups. Between meals, it goes down.

      The fact that your cat is loosing weight makes me very suspicious as to whether his diabetes is actually under control.

      Diabetic cats, and humans, can have what are called Honeymoons. It is a period of time during which it looks like they are no longer diabetic. Virtually all honeymoons – 99.999% – end and the cat or human again needs insulin. It may be that your cat went on a honeymoon which has ended and he once again needs insulin.

      It is a fact, a sad fact but a fact nonetheless, that most vets do not know how to properly treat or monitor diabetic cats and your cat may not know as much as you assume he or she knows.

      Once a cat is diabetic, even if it seems to be controllable with diet, you have to continue to measure the cat’s blood glucose levels. You can’t assume, because they seem to be good for a few days or weeks, that blood glucose levels will remain good.

      Very few diabetic cats can be controlled only with diet. Most, if not all of them, require insulin for the rest of their lives.

      We have been treating diabetic cats for the past 10 years. Simon was diagnosed, on February 26, 2000), about 13 years after he joined the family, and we have adopted three other diabetic cats since then, knowing that they were diabetic when we adopted them.

      When we were talking to the owner of the fourth diabetic cat we adopted, she asked me for a reference. I gave her my vet’s name and telephone number. A few days later she called me back and told me that the vet had said “I can’t think of anyone in the area that can care for a diabetic cat better than Bob”

      I know what I am talking about and you need to figure out why your cat is losing weight.

      I suspect it is because his diabetes is NOT under control.

      Weight loss is one of the classic symptoms of untreated or under treated diabetes.

      You need to measure his blood glucose, more than once, and see where it is during the day. A health cat’s blood glucose level will range from about 50 mg/dL to 120 mg/dL (2.7 mmol/L to 6.6 mmol/L).

      An untreated or undertreated diabetic cat’s blood glucose levels can be well over 300 mg/dL (16.6 mmol/L)

      If you have the vet measure your cat’s blood glucose levels, be aware that stress elevates blood glucose levels (in cats, humans, any mammal) and they vet will see levels higher than the normal range. What is important is how much higher they are – if they are above about 250 mg/dL (13.8 mmol/L) the cat’s diabetes is not under control.

      If your cat’s diabetes is really under control, then there is another disease at work here and you need to find out what it is.

      Weight loss in a cat (diabetic or not) is almost always a symptom of some sort of disease. Diabetes, hyperthyroidism, kidney failure (often called CRF) are but three of the possibilities.

      Now, it is possible that your cat is losing weight because you are not feeding him enough – half a cat of cat food twice a day sound like too little food.

      It is also possible, sort of, that his blood glucose levels are around the normal range because he’s not eating much – but you need to find out the cause of the weight loss – period!

      Here is some information about diabetes:

      Clinical Symptoms of Diabetes:
      - Increased urination
      - Increased thirst
      - Weight loss
      - Increased hunger
      - Lethargy

      Laboratory Symptoms:
      - Excessive glucose in blood
      - Glucose in urine

      The increased urination often results in the cat urinating outside the litter box. Theories are that the cat needs to urinate so often that it simply gives up trying to get to the box or that it becomes uncomfortable or painful to urinate so much and the cat avoids the box because it associates the box with the pain or discomfort.

      Diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas no longer produces sufficient insulin to use glucose in the food or glucose created from protein and amino acids in the food.

      Insulin’s main job is to help cells take in glucose from the bloodstream. Without insulin, only brain and nerve cells can take in glucose.

      Without sufficient insulin, the amount of glucose in the blood increases to quantities that can be as much as 10 times normal. The kidneys filter out glucose and then return it to the blood but with large amounts of glucose in the blood, the kidneys are unable to put all of it back into the blood and some spills over into the bladder with urine.

      This accounts for the increased urination.

      Because of the increased production of urine, more water is excreted and this increases the thirst.

      Because the body is unable to use the glucose, the body goes into starvation mode and this accounts for the loss of weight as fatty tissue is broken down to provide other substances that can be used by cells for “fuel” instead of glucose. This can also increase the hunger.

      A blood glucose test which shows extremely large amounts of glucose in the blood is the first part of the diagnosis. The second part is a urine glucose measurement showing any glucose in the urine.

      Normally, there is no glucose in the urine.

      A vet should have a glucometer which can use a small drop of blood to measure the cat’s blood glucose level.

      If you can take in a urine sample, the vet can use a dip test strip to check for glucose in the urine.

      If you can’t get a urine sample to take in, some vets can get a sample by expressing (squeezing) the bladder or using a syringe and needle to get a sample from the bladder.

      If your cat is diabetic, it will probably require two insulin injections per day.

      If your cat is diabetic, I strongly recommend that you get a glucometer and learn to measure your cat’s blood glucose levels at home.

      We have a web site about our Simon and his diabetes. This link http://www.sugarcatsimon.com will get you there. It is not fully up right now, all that is there is an “under construction” page, it explains why the site is not yet back up.

      If you look at the bottom of the page, you’ll find email addresses for me and Simon (Simon doesn’t keep track of his email so I have it forwarded to me :-)

      Feel free to use the email link there to email me or Simon. Please email me so we can make sure you vet is properly monitoring your cat’s diabetes.

      I will send you my cell phone number, my wife’s cell phone number, and my wife’s business telephone number (she owns and runs the business).

      Be aware that many, if not the majority of vets simply don’t know the correct way to treat diabetic cats.

      That might sound strange but it is sadly true.

      I learned it during the first months after Simon was diagnosed on Saturday, February 26, 2000 at about 11:20 AM – I remember that day very well :-(

      Over the years we have adopted three other diabetic cats, Stranger, Felix, and Kalib.

      Only Felix is still with us.

      There’s nothing about Stranger, Felix, or Kalib on the web site – it is only about Simon, I never got around to adding anything about them.

      I am working on an entire replacement for the site but it will be months before it is ready.

      As I said before, feel free to email me if your cat is diabetic and I’ll help you get started.

      Good Luck

  48. QUESTION:
    How can you help someone with diabetes who likes to eat a lot and doesn’t want to do any exercise?
    My father has diabetes, a couple of mini strokes, and underwent angioplasty heart surgery a few years ago. He takes a lot of medicine for maintenance. I know if his blood sugar isn’t controlled within normal levels, it would be very bad for his health. That’s why all of us in the family wants him to follow a diet and try to get some exercise like walking once in a while. The problem is, he doesn’t want to. When we try to limit his food intake, he gets really angry. Sometimes, he even sneaks going to the refrigerator or sneaks outside to eat at fastfood chains/restaurants. We tried hiring a nurse to watch and control his eating habits and try to make him to walk around. He ended up scaring the nurse away. All of us in the family are concerned for his health. We do not know what to do anymore. Some of us have even given up trying, to make him listen . Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      If father does these exercises everyday, he will have a better quality of life and will be able to eat anything, as the body will be empowered to control the health by the exercises, and will be able to reduce the medication in consultation with doctor.
      These pranayam exercises will help control the diabetes and the side effects.Build up the timing gradually.If you feel tired or dizzy, stop and resume later.The benefits will be noticed in weeks as the sugar level is checked daily.Over the long tern the diabetes will be in full control and the medicine can be reduced in consultation with the doctor.
      Anulom Vilom –
      Close your right nostril with thumb and deep breath-in through left nostril
      then – close left nostril with two fingers and breath-out through right nostril
      then -keeping the left nostril closed deep breath-in through right nostril
      then – close your right nostril with thumb and breath-out through left nostril.
      This is one cycle of anulom vilom.
      Repeat this cycle for 20 to 30 minutes twice a day(maximum 60 minutes in one day).
      You can do this before breakfast/lunch/dinner or before bedtime or in bed.Remember to take deep long breaths into the lungs.You can do this while sitting on floor or chair or lying in bed.

      Kapalbhati -(Do it before eating) Push air forcefully out through the nose about once per second. Stomach will itself go in(contract in). The breathing in(through the nose) will happen automatically. Establish a rhythm and do for 20 to 30 minutes twice a day.(Max 60 min/day) Not for pregnant women. Seriously ill people do it gently.

      Also everyday press the centre point of the palm of your hand 40 times with the thumb and press the tips of all fingers 40 times each

  49. QUESTION:
    Which of the following is NOT a function of bones?
    Which of the following is NOT a function of bones?
    To protect organs
    To allow us to stand
    To provide places of attachment for muscles
    To help transport blood

    2: Which of the following is a difference between bone and cartilage?
    Bones are more flexible than cartilage.
    Bones are harder than cartilage.
    Bones are larger than cartilage.
    Bones heal more completely than cartilage.

    3: All muscles pull rather than push. How, then, is it possible for you to push a table or a chair across a room?
    Because muscles are strong
    Because muscles are arranged in opposed groups
    Because muscles contract in different directions
    Because muscle fiber has many different layers

    4: How does heart muscle tissue resemble voluntary muscle tissue?
    Because the heart has cross-striations
    Because the muscle tissues have one nucleus
    Because we can control our heart beat
    Because the heart is made of smooth muscle tissue

    5: What is a function of plasma?
    To allow blood cells to flow throughout the body
    To bring food to cells of body tissue
    To help fight disease
    To carry hemoglobin to muscle groups

    6: What is one way the blood is adapted to resist the invasion of micro-organisms?
    By carrying hemoglobin to all parts of the body
    By creating lymph out of plasma
    Through white corpuscles
    The blood does not resist invasion, other organs filter blood to remove micro-organisms

    7: Describe the pattern of blood flow through the heart, body, and lungs.
    Blood passes through the left ventricle of the heart to the arteries, through the muscles, into the veins, into the right ventricle of the heart, into the lungs, back into the left ventricle, and begins again
    Blood passes through the lungs to collect oxygen, into the right ventricle, into the veins, into the left ventricle, and into the arteries which lead to the lungs for replenishing the oxygen supply
    Blood passes from the left ventricle to the veins, through the muscles, to the arteries, to the lungs, into the right ventricle of the heart to begin again
    Blood passes from the right ventricle of the heart to the lungs, through the arteries, through the muscles, and back to the lungs through the veins

    8: Distinguish between an artery and a vein.
    An artery is carries much more blood than veins, which branch off of arteries
    Arteries carry oxygen-rich blood to muscle tissue; veins return blood with waste be replenished with oxygen
    Veins carry oxygen-rich blood to muscle tissue; arteries return blood with waste be replenished with oxygen
    A vein carries much more blood than arteries, which branch off of veins

    9: What is meant by “blood type”?
    The kind of cells that make up blood, varying with the ratio of red to white blood cells
    Hemophiliacs have a different blood type than healthy people, which is why their blood does not clot normally
    A classification of blood based on inherited differences on the surface of red blood cells
    A classification of blood based on inherited differences in the chemical compounds that bond to create blood

    10: How is the action of a hormone similar to that of a nerve?
    Because they both bring about responses
    Because they are both delivered through the blood system
    Because they are both issued from parts of the brain
    Because they are both essential in puberty

    11: What is diabetes and how is it treated?
    The pancreas does not supply enough insulin and excessive amounts of sugar collect in the blood. It is treated by controlling diet and injecting extra insulin into the blood.
    The thyroid gland is overactive and can cause weight-loss, irritability, and protrusion of the eyes. It is controlled through various medical procedures to reduce levels of thyroxin.
    The pancreas produces too much insulin and breaks down the sugar in the blood too fast. It is treated by controlled diet and injecting insulin-suppressors into the blood.
    The thyroid gland is under-active and people tend to become obese and slow in reactions. It is controlled by diet and injections of thyroxin.

    • ANSWER:
      1. transport blood
      2. bones are harder
      3. arranged in opposing groups
      4. smooth muscle tissue?
      5. blood cell flow
      6. white corpuscles
      7. Blood passes through the left ventricle of the heart to the arteries….
      8. Arteries to muscle tissue; veins return blood to heart
      9. A classification of blood based on inherited differences on the surface of red blood cells
      10. Because they both bring about responses
      11. The pancreas does not supply enough insulin and excessive amounts of sugar collect in the blood. It is treated by controlling diet and injecting extra insulin into the blood.

  50. QUESTION:
    How do is stay calm ?
    Hey, im 17 yr old guy
    I have reactive hypo-glycemia and irritable bowel syndrome (issues with eating wheat and high fat foods). Anyway reactive hypo-glycemia is a blood sugar level condition where my blood sugars randomly drop to fast for my body to cope, causing fatigue, shaking, sweating, confusion, dizziness, rapid mood changes and some other symptoms…

    Anyway because of the rapid mood changes lately i have been giving my best friend allot of shit (since i got sick) and getting angry over rlly tiny things when im sick and having a reaction, he sort of understands that its not me talking its me being sick but i really hate treating my friend like this because its starting to piss him off and not like me as much…but the problem is i rlly can’t control what i do or say when im having a reaction, how can i stay calm and not get angry at him?

    And i can’t rlly treat the symptoms any better then i already am so i need to find a way not to get angry at him…

    • ANSWER:
      Try to remove yourself from the situation you’re in for a couple of minutes and either close your eyes or stare at a spot on the wall or something. Then take deep breaths through your nose, counting to four as your inhale, holding for four counts, then counting to four again as you exhale. do this for as long as it takes to calm your body down and you will feel better. It also helps because it stops you thinking about whatever is bothering you for a couple of minutes.


Controlling Blood Sugar Levels Pregnancy

You can control and reverse high blood sugar levels with a new diet that has become very successful in the USA and England. The diet can give a normal blood sugar level and has many stopping their medication. Diabetes is a very serious disease that attacks the cells of the body. This illness is extremely serious and kills the body parts by ruining the cells. Those with this illness are advised to take it very seriously and not to delay fixing the problem. It is possible to control or reverse high blood sugar levels.

The enemy of the person with high blood sugar is time. As the diabetic waits, there is a spreading poison in the bloodstream. The high poison blood glucose damages the body. Here is why this is bad news many diabetics wait and or tries the old typical sugar free diets that have never healed diabetes. Sugar free diets cannot remove the poison blood sugar or stop the insulin problem that is causing the body to become destroyed. As the diabetic delays, the poison continues to spread. This is why many diabetics have had to have their legs removed. The legs were cut off because they were poisoned and the circulation was dead. You must reverse or control high blood sugar to save the body.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    32 weeks pregnancy , detected with high sugar levels.What are the safe sugar/glucose levels during pregnancy?
    HI, Im 32 weeks pregnant. During my 24th week the glucose tolerance test was negative. But the recent test showed my fasting blood sugar level to be 101 and PP BS to be 114. The Doctor has asked me to constantly monitor the blood sugar levels at home, 8 times a day..phew..and as well control on diet and exercises. What are the normal blood sugar levels during pregnancy. I have a history of PC OS and as well my mother is a diabetic. does this mean even Iam a diabetic now and what are the proposed risks to my unborn child?

    • ANSWER:
      i was had this issue with both my pregnancies my first it was untreated and she came out almost 10 ibs with my son (he is 4 months old now) i had to monitor my blood same as you before breakfast 1 hour after before snacks and after lunch, dinner etc etc… Normally its ideal if your fasting (when you wake up) glucose level is under 95 after lunch and snacks under 140 is the highest period. It is important to watch what you eat and walk alot. drink plenty of water because if not you will have a sick huge baby. Mine like i said was almost 10ibs and when i delivered her they had to break her clavicle in order to get her out and she now has seizure problems. With my son my sugars could not be controlled with diet alone i was testing at sugar levels of 240 an hour after i ate half a sandwich with only mustard and a peice of turkey. sooo i had to take medication and it still wasnt enough. finally i had to deliver for two reasons
      1. they were afraid he was already large
      2. i developed pre eclamsia.
      so i gave birth to a LARGE 6 ibs 2 oz baby at ONLY 34 weeks.
      he should have been between 4 and 5ibs at 34weeks so listen carefully and do not cheat the results could be worst then pricking your fingers 8 times a day (try doing that and then injecting yourself in the leg arm or lower tummy) it hurts

  2. QUESTION:
    High blood sugar level at 9 weeks pregnancy?
    I took my blood sugar level test after fasting (9 weeks 4 days pregnant) and the result came out high(159). so I need to go for 3 hr glucose test soon. Please let me know if I don’t pass that test either, what is the next step? I am very scared . and particularly can you guide me about some specific diet and exercise to keep the level down and under control? I was eating lots of fruits and some green veggies, milk, whole grain cereal occassionally and some junkie once ina while. what can I do to improve?
    the lab person called me to let me know the result this morning n she scheduled an appoint for 3 hr test in next 3 days.no doc’s appointment till 12th week.I took a test at home before I got pregnant about 10.5 weeks ago, it was 111.

    • ANSWER:
      I am almost certain they are not going to send you for a 3 hr. test until later on in your pregnancy after they do the 1 hr test and it comes back high. Talk to your doctor and let them know about your test.

      My doctor had me cut fruits and fruit juice completely out of my diet as they contain high levels of sugar. It may seem healthy, and i’m sure in small amounts it is, but I was just eating too much I suposse

  3. QUESTION:
    What are normal Blood Sugar levels in 2 or 3 year old healthy kid.?
    Family history
    1) Mom was diagnosed with type 2 at 38 years and started on insulin at 49 years.
    2) Dad was daignosed with type 2 at 49/50 and went on insulin at 65.
    3) One brother (out of two) was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at 9 years.
    4) I had gestational diabetes in first pregnancy and was started on insulin from 12th week (started with 5 NPH). I had very good control during pregnancy though.
    Tested 7 times a day. Made drastic changes to my diet. Very few times my levels were above normal. Target was 130 after 1 hour. and less than 90 fasting. I was within range 90% of the time.

    My child’s readings.

    My kid is 2 1/2 year old now. Her 2 hour test was 115. Tested at home after dinner.

    Her Dinner was,

    1) White Rice cooked (2/3 cup)
    2) peas and paneer curry
    (Peas 2 about tsps,
    cheese half ounce,
    tamato + onion gravy 2tsp.)
    3) Plain yogurt 1/3 rd cup.
    4) Bite size snickers bar.

    She took her main meal in about 25 mins and ate her snickers 10 mins later.

    • ANSWER:
      Normal for anyone – kids or not is approximately 90-145. Anything over 200 and you can look at diabetes as something to be investigated.

      Having had gestational diabetes you do have a higher chance of developing T2 diabetes – exercising and watching what you eat can definitely make a HUGE difference.

      A non-diabetic will have almost no fluctuation with their eating – whereas a pre-diabetic can.

      In children that young – they will get Type 1 diabetes – or juvenille as some people call it.

      115 is just fine.

      Just look out for other symptoms. Excessing thirst, frequent urinating, lethargy without normal reasoning, sweet smelling breath.

      Check out websites such as www.diabetes-book.com and read up on it more.

      I am a type 2 diabetic diagnosed at age 39.

  4. QUESTION:
    33 weeks pregnant with high sugar/glucose level?
    HI, Im 33 weeks pregnant. During my 24th week the glucose tolerance test was negative. But the recent test showed my fasting blood sugar level to be 101 and PP BS to be 114. The Doctor has asked me to constantly monitor the blood sugar levels at home, 8 times a day..phew..and as well control on diet and exercises. What are the normal blood sugar levels during pregnancy. I have a history of PC OS and as well my mother is a diabetic. does this mean even I’m a diabetic now and what are the proposed risks to my unborn child?

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor should tell you what’s normal. But I know while I was pregnant (I lost the baby at 22 weeks due to complications that had nothing to do with being a diabetic, even though I’ve been a type 1 for 24 years.) my obgyn and my endo told me my blood sugars should be between 75-80 fasting and 90-100 after eating. Aks your doctor though. He/she should be able to tell you what you should be aiming for. Especially if you’re testing that many times a day. Your doctor can also do tests to check of diabetes now, he or she may even want to run another glucose tolerance test. They can also tell you any risks to your baby. You’re pretty far along, and I’m sure you’ve had all the pre natal test done to check for anything that may be wrong with your baby, but just to be on the safe side, have your doctor fill you in on all the questions you asked here. That’s what they get paid the big bucks for. :) Good luck with your little one.

  5. QUESTION:
    Diabetes and Pregnancy?
    I have type 1 diabetes, i’ve had it for the past 9 and a half years, i’m 22 now and i am considering having children in the near future. i was just wondering if any women who have diabetes and have kids, how their experiences were?? and how hard it is to control your blood sugars levels during pregnancy.
    I now have 4 shots a day, 3 shots of NovoRapid and 1 shot of Lantus, I was recently put on this dose as my old dose of 2 shots of Mixtard 30/70 were making my blood sugar levels jump too high and too low, since i’ve been put on the new dose, my levels have been very good.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes you can get pregnant with diabetes but it may be hard and you will have a high risk pregnancy and will have to be monitored very closely. You should speak to your endocrinologist and OB/GYN before even trying. Two of my friends have had several pregnancies with success but they have also had complications and miscarriages. The hormones during pregnancy make blood sugar control difficult but it can be done. Good luck.

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the accurate level of diabetes during pregnancy?
    Hi i am 28 weeks pregnant and i am suffering from gestational diabetes and from last week i have been monitoring my blood sugar levels by following a special diet and regular exercise. And after all this my sugar level has come under control but sometimes it comes in between 5m/mol and sometimes its just under a required level that means 6.7m/mol (after meal). So i was just wondering as long it comes under 7m/mol is good or as lower is better?

    • ANSWER:
      Lower is better, but this is not something you should stress too much about as long as it’s under 7. Stress can actually raise blood glucose. Keep up the healthy diet, exercise daily, and don’t fret.

      You should be aware that many women who have had gestational diabetes will develop type two diabetes later in life. You should also be aware that you can prevent it. The most important thing you can do right now is learn all you can about a healthy, high nutrient, low carb Calorie diet. Basically what that means is more raw natural fruits and vegetables and fewer man made products which are often stripped of important nutrients. The nutrients that keep your cells and organs healthy. When cells become unhealthy, they become insulin resistant. That’s when your pancreas produces too much insulin as the blood sugar levels go up. That can cause several things to happen and that is why such a high percentage of the population is unhealthy. For more, look up metabolic syndrome to see exactly what is going on in your body. Watch the video linked below, it’s revealing:

  7. QUESTION:
    Glucose test (diabetes) during pregnancy?
    So I took the 1 hour test on Monday. The dr office called and said I failed, so I went in today for the 3 hour test. I live about 30 minutes from the hospital and by the time I got home, I was really sick (freezing, but badly sweating, couldn’t keep eyes open, couldn’t concentrate, shaking…). I quickly ate something, and then the phone rang and it was my dr’s office. They wanted to make sure I was ok and made it home, because the last blood draw showed a blood sugar level of 34. They said this was extremly low. The nurse who called would not really discuss the results and what it meant (said I had to talk to dr next Tues), although she did say she did not have the results of the other blood tests. She only knew about the low one, because the lab called because they were concerned. I guess I was wondering if this has happened to anyone else? Or if anyone else has had low blood sugar during pregnancy, and what they had to do to control it?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes keep some juice or a quick snack with you at all times in the car or your purse when your out cause you can get dizzy at a drop of a dime and trust me you don’t want that. Plus your doctor should discuss this further with you on next visit and subscribe meds I cant believe they let you leave before giving you your results this is really unsafe on their behalf because something serious could have happened and it would have been their fault. After I took my test they wouldn’t let me leave because mines was a little low so they brought me and orange and cheese and crackers and a juice and me and hubby stayed for about an hour after until I felt fine hope this helps you out.
      Please discuss this matter further with your doctor on your next visit that was very negligent!!

  8. QUESTION:
    How to control blood pressure during pregnancy?
    Im 28 and 12 weeks pregnant with my first child. 4 days ago i went to the clinic to check my blood pressure and it read 96/55 and the sugar level was at 3,9% Im worried that this will have an impact on my child. How do i control it and what should i avoid? just to think that 3 weeks ago it was high but stabilised in 3 days…Or is this normal???

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    Repost: Pregnant with low blood sugars all the time, even though I cut basal levels.Is something really wrong?
    I’ll be 36 weeks tomorrow. Doctor says placenta and baby look fine and happy, besides the baby being 7lbs 9 oz 3 weeks ago! I’ve been having contraction and irritability since week 29, it never goes away. With no other complications. Recently instead of upping my basal levels and trying to keep them under control, like that which is common among third trimester pregnancy’s , my blood sugars have been constantly low! The other night was the scariest when I caught it at 32, it literally dropped so fast, I didn’t know it was coming. I went to bed with a blood sugar of 85, which is good, but I drank some Hawaiian punch anyway because I’m so afraid of dropping, 20 minutes later, i feel like crap and can’t sleep, my sugar is 54, I drink a chocolate milk which was with the chocolate mix alone 2 Carbs plus the milk was another 22gCHO. 10 minutes later I feel like crap, my blood sugar is 32, I drank 3 1/2 12 oz glasses of OJ. I woke up in the morning with a blood sugar of 47! This is really bizarre for me because since I’ve been diabetic for 7 years, i’m so brittle, I couldn’t smell sugar without my blood sugar rising. The doctor just cut all my basal levels, at night it was 1.9 now it is 0.5 and now at 3:30am, my blood sugar was 45! It’s quite sad. It’s wearing me out and scaring me at the same time. I didn’t even cover my 30g Dinner tonight. Has this happened to any other pregnant woman? Or anyone for that matter?

    - I am in constant contact with my doctor but he said he’s never seen this before in a pregnant woman , unless it’s after she gives birth.

    • ANSWER:

  10. QUESTION:
    How to get better control of my type 1 diabetes so that I can get pregnant?
    My fiance and I both would like to have a baby, except that my Blood Sugar Levels are still fairly high, My last HBA1C was about 9.1.
    I would like to know what are some ways of getting my Diabetes under better control faster, so that I can have a better pregnancy and by not putting the baby at so much risk?

    • ANSWER:
      Talk to your Doctor immediately. He or she can work with you to get your diabetes under control. You would want to find an ob/gyn who has experience with pregnant women with diabetes, and work with him/her before you become pregnant to ensure that you have a safe pregnancy for you and your baby. You may also find a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) who are a great help in working with your day to day control issues of control, you may also want to work with a nutritionist to make sure you are eating the right things to maintain good BG control, as well as what you should eat for your baby’s nutrition. Good luck! http://www.diabetes.org/gestational-diabetes/pregancy.jsp

  11. QUESTION:
    How high does blood sugar have to be to harm a developing fetus?
    I am a diabetic and last wednesday found out that I am pregnant. I am having a hard time getting my blood sugar down to the levels my Dr wants it at. My Dr wants me to be under 120 1 hr after eating and less than 90 before breakfast. My 1hrs have been averaging anywhere from 150-130. I’ve even had a 173. I just stopped taking Metformin last Friday and started insulin today. The insulin dose of 3 units per meal don’t appear to bringing it down to the desired level yet. I am only 5 wks pregnant, almost 6. I am very concerned about the effect these blood sugar fluxuations are having on my unborn baby. Would love any advice from anyone who has been there done that. or who just knows alot about the subject. I’m not even having that many carbs. I was controlled pretty well up until I got pregnant but pregnancy hormones are causing problems.

    Any advice or things I should really be aware of? I’m praying to God that my blood sugars have don’t damage to my baby.

    Thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:

  12. QUESTION:
    ketones and pregnancy?
    I am 28 weeks pregnant. Due April 25th. This is my 3rd pregnancy and never had this problem.

    Last week I failed my glucose test

    1 hour 147

    Went back in to do a fasting 3 hour test

    Fasting 96
    1 hour 214
    2 hour 179
    3 hour 149

    So now they have me on a diet. 3 meals 3 snacks Counting my carbs grams and meat in take. I check my blood sugar levels during the day and my keytones levels when I wake up. I am doing good with the sugar levels I have problems before dinner and the 2 hour test after dinner some times. But the past two mornings I have failed my keytones test. With high levels as dark as the strip can get.

    Keytones this is what I know about them
    Ketones are produced when your body gets energy by breaking down fat instead of sugar.
    Ketones become a problem when you do not have enough insulin to control ketone production properly or you are truly starving because of lack of food. When too many ketones are produced too quickly they upset the delicate balance of the body’s chemistry and can lead to a problem called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

    My question is what is the next step? What will they have me do, or is there any more test coming up? Just a little curious want more info. I am posting this in two groups pregnancy and health. I do eat what my diet tells me to the t. I am a little ocd about following rules so I know I am doing it right.
    Thank you for all the help!
    I am calling the Dr in the AM and going in Tuesday.

    • ANSWER:
      When my son gets ketones the Dr. tells him to drink lots of water. You should tell the Dr. if you have 2 high tests in a row.If you get DKA you have to be hospitalized.

  13. QUESTION:
    Very tired in 33 weeks of pregnancy?
    Hi all,
    I have gestational diabetes, found out at week 28. Since then, I’ve been on a controlled diet. I’ve been advised to walk at least 30 minutes but for the past 2 or 3 weeks, I’ve been feeling extremely tired and weakness in my legs especially in the morning. It’s such a struggle to get out of bed or do things. I really have to push myself. I have an appointment in less than 2 weeks where my blood sugar levels will be re-tested. Has anyone experienced this in their pregnancies? Any advice on how to gain a bit more energy? Does it mean I could be anemic or have low iron?

    • ANSWER:

  14. QUESTION:
    Did I have a miscarriage without even knowing I’m pregnant?
    I had my period a little over a week ago, but for the past 3 1/2 weeks I’ve been feeling stranger than ever. I’ve never felt this way before. I had a headache for a week, I felt like I was going to faint, I was light headed, dizzy, and exhausted no matter how much sleep I got. I also was getting sudden, brief waves of nausea; I would just be sitting there eating, then have to run to the bathroom to throw up. I thought I might be pregnant, but I took a pregnancy test and it was negative. But then two days ago I started having very mild menstrual cramps then I went to the bathroom and a very small string of clotted blood came out of me. That’s never happened to me before. I had a million blood tests from cbc, to blood sugar levels, to testing my kidney function and thyroid. Everything came out normal. I also had a blood pregnancy test after the blood clot and it was negative. After the blood clot came out of me I stopped taking my birth control and now I am having my period again after 4 days of not taking it. Could I have had an early miscarriage? I’ve never felt like that before and ever since that “blood clot” came out of me I feel much much better, no dizziness or nausea since then. Now I am having my period because I stopped taking my BC pills, or is it from the miscarriage? Did I have an early miscarriage?

    • ANSWER:

  15. QUESTION:
    High blood sugars past few days for no reason?
    Ever since Friday of last week my blood sugar level has been above 300. I am 17 and I’ve been well controlled for the past few years. I’m rarely ever high unless it’s a special occasion such as my birthday. I’ve been a diabetic, type one, since i was four years old.

    I am on the lantus solarstar pen 28 units before bed and on the novopen for one unit per every 8 carbs plus corrections if needed (rarely).

    I’m kindof afraid to mention this to my parents right now, for my bad diabetes control in my early teen years.

    Only way my insulin works is if i take five times the amount i would normaly take.

    My question is what can i do?

    Did my body stop reacting to insulin?

    I tried a new pen of each, same results, and the pens are not expired.

    Anyone else go through this?

    Any way to help lower it better?

    Could a possible pregnancy be the reason??
    My period is due soon and i have had unprotected sex, and I know, don’t yell at me, it was wrong and i risked a lot by doing that, and I’m sorry. Could that stress play a part in it?

    • ANSWER:
      Lin, you need to talk to your medical team about this. 300 is crazy high!

      They can also find out whether you are pregnant or not because you will need to find out one way or the other.

      Give your diabetes nurse a call

  16. QUESTION:
    High blood sugars won’t go away…help please, I’m scared!!?
    Ever since Friday of last week my blood sugar level has been above 300. I am 17 and I’ve been well controlled for the past few years. I’m rarely ever high unless it’s a special occasion such as my birthday. I’ve been a diabetic, type one, since i was four years old.

    I am on the lantus solarstar pen 28 units before bed and on the novopen for one unit per every 8 carbs plus corrections if needed (rarely).

    I’m kindof afraid to mention this to my parents right now, for my bad diabetes control in my early teen years.

    Only way my insulin works is if i take five times the amount i would normaly take.

    My question is what can i do?

    Did my body stop reacting to insulin?

    I tried a new pen of each, same results, and the pens are not expired.

    Anyone else go through this?

    Any way to help lower it better?

    Could a possible pregnancy be the reason??
    My period is due soon and i have had unprotected sex, and I know, don’t yell at me, it was wrong and i risked a lot by doing that, and I’m sorry. Could that stress play a part in it?

    • ANSWER:
      A. You have type 1 diabetes – the way you take insulin does not change that. B. You cannot become suddenly resistant to insulin. C. Do not exercise if your blood sugar is out of control. D. Your first inclination is the strongest possibility – get a pregnancy test immediately. E.No matter how hard it will be to tell your parents – you must do so immediately, no matter what the cause. You are in danger of diabetic keto-acidosis. They will be understandably upset but only because they are concerned for your well being. E. Stress, hormones and many other things can cause your blood sugars to spike. If you are not pregnant, get checked for celiac disease. My diabetic son has celiac and once he went gluten free, we were able to control his blood sugar more effectively.

  17. QUESTION:
    Does anyone had blood sugar issues from Abilify?
    Hi, my psychiatrist recently started me on a small does of Abilify as an add on to my Lithium to control hallucinations associated with Bipolar Disorder.

    I am diabetic but my problem is hypoglycemia but this is my 2nd day on Abilify (I may be getting ill) and my fasting sugar was nearly 150!

    I would rather have high sugar than all the trouble with the low levels I’ve been having but I’m nearly 8 months pregnant (Abilify is safest during pregnancy) and I don’t want high sugars to affect my unborn baby.

    It just seemed a little weird that such a small dose after 2 days would increase my sugars like this, they are normally in the 60′s-70′s (or lower) fasting and 70-90′s 2 hours after a meal.

    Can anyone tell me of their experiences with blood sugar increases and at what dose of Abilify?

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think it affects all diabetics this way but my sugar hit 500 or more, I’m not sure if it was any higher because that’s as high as my meter would go. I was not very smart and didn’t go to the hospital. It almost floored me. I was at work and my boss, not a very nice boss, (No longer work for her) wouldn’t get me a replacement and I wasn’t thinking clearly. I got better after a few hours. I can’t remember what the dose was, it was just a starter dose, if I remember right. But I’m positive it was the pill since I hadn’t really eaten enough carbs for that to happen.

      I would keep my eye on it, just for a while. but don’t let me scare you, my reaction wasn’t a slow over time thing, it just went up fast.

  18. QUESTION:
    how necessary is glucose testing during pregnancy?
    I have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) naturally. This is my second pregnancy. During my first pregnancy I also had gestational diabetes (high blood sugar). My baby doctor told me I had to go for glucose testing and said I had no choice. The reason I dont want to go is, the sugar drink made me very sick when I took it during my first pregnancy. When I was diagnosed with Gestational diabetes, all they did was send me to a diet class and give me another sugar blood tester which I already have. I do not at all believe I have gestational diabetes, I would know if my sugar levels were as out of control as they were when I had it during my first pregnancy. Even if i had it, I know how to eat, Im already diabetic. Is it really necessary to get tested? They give me the sugar drink, make me sit in the waiting room for hours, as I feel like im going to pass out, then they take my blood. Whats the point? My nurse yelled at me today and told me I need to get it done. Is it really necessary?
    no prescription needed for test strips or blood glucose supplies, i buy them at the drug store
    Neato, that is good to know but I am against inductions. I had a terrible time when I neared my due date with my son.My doctors were trying to force an induction on me, but I refused it. He came out 2 weeks late naturally, they checked the placenta and it was great. ty tho.

    • ANSWER:
      First you say that you have hypoglycemia the you state you have diabetes .This is confusing.
      First figure out what you have and make sure to do everything you have to for your own sake and your baby’s life.

      If you have a prescription for testing strips your insurance can pay for them and you don’t have to pay out of pocket.

  19. QUESTION:
    Diabetic Type 1 and Pregnant?
    I just found out im 8 wks pregnant. I don’t have a normal menstrual cycle so I didnt think i was pregnant plus we used birth control. I wasn’t planning/expecting to be pregnant. I’m a type 1 insulin dependent diabetic. My sugar levels havent been good maybe around 150-200 max. I would like to know if anyone had high blood sugar levels from the start of the pregnancy and had a healthy baby????

    I had a previous pregnancy and my baby was born with a heart problem and passed away shortly after. The doctor said the heart develops the first 60 days and i am passed that.

    I am working with the doctor to get them down and im on a strict diet so i am working on my sugars.

    Thanks for all your answers.

    • ANSWER:
      There is a group called Pregnant at Kids on yahoo that is for people on a low carb diet and trying to conceive or pregnant. I think some are diabetics also. I’m just not sure if you follow a low carb diet or not.
      To subscribe and check it out to see if it is for you:

      PregnantAtKids-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

  20. QUESTION:
    has anyone ever been pregnant with type 2 diabetes befor?
    hi everyone,I have type 2 diabetes and I guess you can say it’s under control. I’m not on any meds but I am over weight. I think I may be pregnant. what are the problems you have with pregnancy when you have diabetes? I want people with real life exsperiences not a web link with statistics okay, thank you.what are the chances of you dying in labor or through your pregnancy? and what can you eat to give the baby the nutrition it needs but also keep your blood sugar levels normal? thanks….

    • ANSWER:
      To you smart alecks that are talking about fats and candy…shut up you’re clueless.

      I got gestational diabetes when I got pregnant.

      If you aren’t on insulin now, you will be when you get past month 4 or so.

      The hardest part is the weght gain with the insulin and not being able to eat too many fruits or milk.

      I gave up most of my carbs.
      Ate really really healthy
      Got plenty of excercise
      And tested 4 or 5 times a day and took 4 shots a day.

      You won’t die in labor and it won’t harm your baby…the worst that can happen is that your baby will be larger than most (Mine was 10.1lbs) and after birth the baby may have to be on glucose but other than that you’ll both be fine. (Because the baby is producing more insulin to deal with your sugar levels too, so when he’s out and your sugar is gone…his sugar level drops drastically because of his extra insulin)

      You may end up having a c section because of the size of the baby (I did).
      But you’ll be fine.

      You’ll have to go to your OB and an Endocrinologist (but if you’re type two you probably already have one)

      Good Luck mama and congratulations!

  21. QUESTION:
    Type 1 diabetes and pregnancy…. very concerned?
    HELLO EVERYONE, I AM HERE BECAUSE I THINK I MIGHT BE PREGNANT AND WILL DO WHATEVER TO KEEP THIS BABY MY PROBLEM IS THAT I AM A 23 YEAR OLD TYPE 1 DIABETIC WHO HAS NOT BEEN TAKING CARE OF HERSELF FOR THE PAST YEAR AND A HALF. I KNOW , SHAME ON ME, IT WAS A STUPID MISTAKE. MY SUGAR LEVELS ARE REALLY HIGH, AND I RECENTLY STARTED TAKING INSULIN AGAIN (ABOUT 5 DAYS AGO). IF I AM PREGNANT, I REALLY WOULD LIKE TO HAVE A HEALTHY BABY. I KNOW THAT HIGH SUGAR LEVELS ARE VERY DANGEROUS FOR THE BABY BUT I WANT TO KNOW IF ITS TOO LATE TO START EATING HEALTHIER AND CONTROL THE BLOOD SUGAR. HAS ANYONE BEEN THROUGH THIS N HAD A HEALTHY BABY??? I AM REALLY WORRIED AND KNOW IVE MADE A TERRIBLE MISTAKE BY NOT TAKING CARE OF MYSELF. PLEASE, ANY ADVISE WILL HELP. AND YES, I KNOW I SHOULD GO TO THE DR, I AM GOING THIS MONDAY. THANKS FOR YOUR HELP N FOR TAKING THE TIME TO READ THIS.

    • ANSWER:
      Please stop YELLING .
      You need to contact a Perinatal groups to care for you and your baby.
      These special doctors work with women who are in hi risk pregnancies.

      Like the person above me said, you cannot have type 1 and not take insulin for over a year and not die.

      I’m not sure what your story is.

  22. QUESTION:
    Pregnant and Cut my basal levels by more than half, what is going on? Long Please read though!?
    I’ll be 36 weeks tomorrow. Doctor says placenta and baby look fine and happy, besides the baby being 7lbs 9 oz 3 weeks ago! I’ve been having contraction and irritability since week 29, it never goes away. With no other complications. Recently instead of upping my basal levels and trying to keep them under control, like that which is common among third trimester pregnancy’s , my blood sugars have been constantly low! The other night was the scariest when I caught it at 32, it literally dropped so fast, I didn’t know it was coming. I went to bed with a blood sugar of 85, which is good, but I drank some Hawaiian punch anyway because I’m so afraid of dropping, 20 minutes later, i feel like crap and can’t sleep, my sugar is 54, I drink a chocolate milk which was with the chocolate mix alone 2 Carbs plus the milk was another 22gCHO. 10 minutes later I feel like crap, my blood sugar is 32, I drank 3 1/2 12 oz glasses of OJ. I woke up in the morning with a blood sugar of 47! This is really bizarre for me because since I’ve been diabetic for 7 years, i’m so brittle, I couldn’t smell sugar without my blood sugar rising. The doctor just cut all my basal levels, at night it was 1.9 now it is 0.5 and now at 3:30am, my blood sugar was 45! It’s quite sad. It’s wearing me out and scaring me at the same time. I didn’t even cover my 30g Dinner tonight. Has this happened to any other pregnant woman? Or anyone for that matter?

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    What is happening in my case? Advice needed. Please help.?
    Hi all,

    I am 29 years old, I conceived after 8 years of my marriage through IUI. I went for 3 cycles and the last one has been clicked. I have no complications when I was conceived. In the fourth month I have been diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes. From that time, I have taken the insulin daily to keep my blood sugar under control. But my doctor told not to control the food except sweets and sugar because the baby wouldn’t grow. So I completely cut off the sugar items in all my food but as a south Indian, I ate rice twice a day. Taken all the precautions in all angels. And I went to my mom’s place in my 3rd month of pregnancy. Everything was fine till the 8th month. Suddenly in 33rd week I noticed that there were no movements of my baby. I went for scan and doctor confirmed that there is no heart beat and movements. Doctor told that It is an Intra Uterine Death of 32 weeks because of Gestational Diabetes. Is that true? Why it was happened? Now a days many people are having Gestational Diabetes. They are not having their children? Many people are happily conceiving and having their babies who are already diagnosed with diabetes? But in my case what happened? And my doctor told that, it’s all your fate.
    I delivered a healthy male child through normal delivery. After delivery my sugar levels are controlled. But now I am facing another problem. The day before yesterday my fasting blood sugar is 65mg as per glucometer. After lunch (with 1.5 hour gap) I tested again with my glucometer and it showed the reading was 178mg/dl. I was a little bit worried and checked again within a half minute and it showed 160mg/dl. Why so? What is the correct reading? Why it was decreased 18 points? The second level is under control. Then I did the test after my dinner and it showed 113mg/dl. Again I checked within the minute it showed 146, and again 135. Which was correct? I was confused a lot. Again yesterday I tested after lunch it showed 199 and 165mg/dl. Again I tested after my dinner it was 216, 205, and 201. And today morning my fasting BS is 102mg/dl. Am I diabetic? I am in a confused state. What reading I should consider? Does sugar levels vary that much in a very short span of time or with in a minute? There is an information on my glucometer manual is that, “Don’t use the glucometer for the diagnosis of diabetes. It is for the monitoring of blood sugar levels of diabetic patients only.” Doctors will also check through the blood test and confirm the diabetes and not by this kind of meters. I need a sincere advice, what should I do? I am worrying about my readings? Why that much variation occur? What is the correct reading of my blood sugar? Am I diabetic or not? Please advice.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jasmine.

    • ANSWER:

  24. QUESTION:
    Is there any statistics on risks of a well managed pregnant diabetic?
    I have type 2 Diabetes. This is my first pregnancy. I am ten weeks pregnant and have already confirmed my child has a very healthy heartbeat. My doctors monitored my blood sugars and made sure I was well to get pregnant. I have been monitoring my blood sugars and keeping my primary care doctor aware of my sugar levels and have switched to insulin which I regularly inject in me. I’m so tired of seeing statistics of what happens if you do not control blood sugar while pregnant. From what I have been researching through numerous websites they say that even with well managed blood sugar levels there will still be a risk for birth defects and such but does anyone know what those statistics would be? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry, I don’t have any studies for you, but I am a type 2 diabetic on my second pregnancy. For my first, I was seeing a doctor at the Sansum Clinic in Santa Barbara, and I was getting state-of-the-art treatment in exchange for being part of their studies. My general understanding was that if you have your blood sugars under control your chances of a birth defect drop to equal those of a non-diabetic woman. As you already know, the first 8 weeks are the most crucial.

      The treatment boiled down to exactly what you’re doing – keeping on top of your blood sugars so that they mimic those of a non-diabetic woman in pregnancy.

      The bulletin board at the Sansum Clinic was covered with pictures of happy, healthy babies. I had a healthy, normal weight baby and delivered without a c-section. Those are only anecdotes but the bottom line is that with good blood sugar control you are just like other pregnant women. Keeping on top of my sugars was difficult enough that I didn’t have time to think about any other possible problems.

      Edit: Reading my answer, what I meant to make clear is that non-diabetic women still have a statistical chance of having a child with a birth defect, so that’s why they word these studies as “lowers your chance to xx%” or “increases your chance to xx%.” No one gets off scott-free.

  25. QUESTION:
    Teenage diabetic type 1 help?
    Well. I am a sixteen year old teenage girl and I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a year and a half ago (precisely 13 Jan 2010…had an exam the next day and I was clueless about it).

    So far, I find myself able to control my levels…if I bother. As in, if I check my blood sugar levels regularly, I usually manage to accurately estimate how much insulin I need to take for a meal…with the occasional mess-up here and there.

    The main problem is in the following fact. I am desperately unmotivated, at times, to regulate my blood sugar. It may be the fact that I get annoyed by how I have to check how much I am allowed to eat, what I am not ‘allowed’ to have, how everyone who knows about my ‘situation’ seems to avoid wanting to talk about it and mostly how I find myself unable to talk to another girl about certain issues which affect us…in terms of our menstruation cycles and pregnancy and what not.

    Now I want to go to someone to talk…be it a consultant or a psychologist. I just feel the need to converse with someone who will treat me like I am a mature and sane person (and I am…personality wise at least) and not relay everything back to my parents, since my mom openly worries a lot until it gets suffocating ( but she is getting better ) and my dad is in denial of the fact that I am indeed ill and that there is a problem which needs to be solved. So when I start a topic of wanting to go to someone and talk about it, my dad brushes it off, saying that ‘There is no need sweetie. There is no problem. If you want, we can make an appointment with your endocrinologist…where one of my parental units will attend.
    My mom, on the other hand, started crying and then, after calming down, offered to talk with me about it, on the basis that she was a type 2. But I do not deal well with crying women…especially if I am the cause. So I tend to not tell anyone in my family if I am going high or low unless it is somewhat a bigger than usual problem.

    School is not really an option…because our system is a ridicule in, and of itself. There is no order whatsoever and you can kiss confidentiality in the a**. Of course, that is ignoring the fact that out ‘consultant’ is very hard to find in school, if she even exists.

    Now, all I am searching for in this long speech of mine…is help, since obtaining any in real life is incredibly…hard.

    I want someone to give me motivation. Because, no matter what I do, there is always this week where I refuse to take insulin, until after the meal by 2-3 hours…when I start feeling parched and guilty. Self-motivation can only take you so far.

    And if it wouldn’t be too much trouble…are there any diabetics who got the condition before getting pregnant? I am still young, and I do not plan on even attempting the act before I am 22, but I am really afraid… I want to give birth, but I refuse to have my babies harmed in any way. Would you please provide advice or a way of communication…it is one topic which keeps nagging in the recess of my mind during the day.

    Second thing: While I can control my blood sugar when I choose to(most of the time), my snacks are usually unhealthy. Any tips for integrating healthy habits into my daily routine…like kinds of fruits(I eat most of them…aside from apples.) or home-made, satisfying meals, would be greatly appreciated.

    P.S. The reason for the excessive details was a silent request for whoever would provide the advice to seek help from a doctor/other professionals. I am not willing to face the trials in order for that to happen. What I basically want, is assurance backed with firm evidence.

    Oh…and I am usually hyper and un-depressed, so no need for any worrying from that sense

    Thank you in advance.

    Cheers :D

    • ANSWER:
      Here’s a second recommendation for tudiabetes.org. It is an online networking site for diabetics. I call it ‘Facebook on insulin’. Almost everyone on there has diabetes themselves, and if they don’t, they are the loved one of a diabetic. There are discussion groups for various interests including a few for teens/young people with Type 1. I think you would be able to find people who really understand what you are going through.

      For what it’s worth, here’s my two cents. So diabetes sucks big time and so we all wish we didn’t have a horrible incurable disease. But the complications of diabetes suck even bigger time. That’s what motivates me to keep going – I concentrate on a picture of myself blind, limbless and attached to a dialysis machine and I think, no thanks. That’s not going to be me. And the best way of making sure that’s not going to be you, is to take control of your diabetes and not let it take control of you.

      Something you said about what you are ‘allowed’ to eat. Actually, as a Type 1 diabetic, you are allowed to eat anything you want. You just have to bolus insulin to match your food. You have complete flexibility over your diet! Of course, you shouldn’t go insane and drink 3 gallons of regular Coke in one sitting. But if you wanted to have a donut (22g carb), French fries (32g carb for a small serving) or a KitKat (15g carb) – go ahead and do it! Just make sure you inject the insulin to match that. If you don’t know how to carb count, now’s the time to learn.

      You will find it most mentally liberating once you realize you CAN eat anything. It is just a matter of matching insulin. Of course, you have to be sensible about this, but you sound like a sensible person.

      As for pregnancy – I was diagnosed with Type 1b last June and am now 15 weeks pregnant. There is no reason why diabetics cannot have safe pregnancies like everyone else. The main issue is that blood sugar levels need to be kept as close to non-diabetic as possible. That means A1C of under 6.5 before you try to conceive. Under 6 is even better. When blood sugar is at non-diabetic levels, the risk goes down to the same as a non-diabetic woman. But when blood sugar is uncontrolled, diabetic pregnancy is high-risk and faces the chance of birth defects, stillbirths, and harm to mother and baby.

      Finally your question about ‘unhealthy’ snacks. Well, define unhealthy. From a diabetes management point of view, anything that raises your blood sugar beyond the safe range is unhealthy. I don’t eat ‘healthy’ snacks like bananas or granola bars because they are extremely high in carbs and raise my blood sugar beyond the safe range. Yes, I could inject insulin for them but those things don’t excite me enough to want to inject insulin. Whereas ham and cheese roll ups won’t raise blood sugar by much, neither will nuts, avocados or olives. The point is that you have to think about what ‘healthy’ means because when you have a serious carbohydrate metabolism dysfunction, what is ‘healthy’ for you is not the same as what is ‘healthy’ for people with normal metabolisms.

  26. QUESTION:
    Confused feelings and who to see?
    I’m 26 years old, and living an extremely happy life. I have found that within the past year and a half, I have been losing interest in almost everything. I’m fatigued, I don’t want to go out, I barely want to leave the house. I cry at almost everything. My spouse is confused because he doesn’t know how to fix it, I’m confused because I’m not sure why its happening. I go to the grocery store and I cry in the aisles because I can’t decide between chicken noodle soup or Ramen Noodles! I can’t sleep; I have to take 3 Valerian Root capsules and 3 Melatonin’s right before bed to just make me drowsy enough to start to get to sleep. Nothing tragic happened that caused this.

    I can fake it at work, but it takes everything I’ve got to just stay focused. Is it depression? Is there a particular doctor I should/need to see about this?

    I take a multi-vitamin already, and Super B-Complex (by recommendation of the pharmacy… *shrugs*), none of these are really working to help anything. I don’t have a regular doctor, I just go to the Doctor’s Care (not a health department exactly, more like an upscale health department! lol) At least my humor is still intact I guess…….

    *sigh* I’m just tired of being tired. I had them check my blood, they didn’t find anything. But, I’m having trouble keeping my blood sugar up. The Doctor’s Care said my blood work is fine and they found no trace of diabetes or hypoglycemia. (Even though I collapsed two weeks ago from low blood sugar levels.) I’m so confused…. am I rambling?

    If anyone can offer any kind of advice on what type of doctor I should see, I’d be very grateful. Would the General Practioner at this Doctor’s Care be able to take care of me?? I’m so scared of being put on an anti-depressant or some other medication…

    Its not pregnancy. My partner and I use birth control, AND I’m on my period, so I definitely know its not that! I’ve been on a regular cycle, no worries there.

    And, with exercise… I used to be hardcore into yoga and it used to really feel good. Now… I just can’t even motivate myself to motivate! To even THINK about going to my gym (that I DO have a membership with) is way too overwhelming. I’m 5’4″ and 105lbs, hardly overweight, but I look at myself and think, “God, could you BE any more unflattering??” Ugh. I NEVER used to think of myself like this. I’ve liked the way I look. I’ve talked with my partner about it, and he just doesn’t know what to do or say. Its so frustrating putting that kind of pressure on someone without even knowing you’re doing it….

    So, is it depression? Can it be altered with something ELSE over-the-counter? What kind of doc do I need to see if I DO go?

    Thanks for the shopping advice… Unfortunately, 0 later.. I’m still depressed. But I got a few nice dresses out of it. In 1 hour, I spent 0…. Now I’m depressed cause I should’ve spent more TIME spending 0.

    Taking my mind off the depression just somehow makes coming back to it worse. I have to face it sooner or later.

    • ANSWER:
      Awwww hun, i’m sorry you’re so brain frizzled and blue at the moment mate …… are you eating enough foods rich in calcium and magnesium?? being deficient in calcium will produce insomnia, headaches and migraines, achy bones, irritability and moodines, terrible mood swings, digestive upsets such as constipation and bloating …….. being deficient in magnesium will cause nasty headaches, muscle twitching, nervous tension, lower backpain ……… magnesium rich foods will help to lower high blood pressure and reduce your stress levels mate …. magnesium is known as the antistress mineral …. eat more foods rich in calcium and magnesium such as leafy and green vegies (lightly steamed or raw), organic nuts and seeds like almonds, brazil nuts and sunflower seeds, fresh fish like tuna, salmon and sardines……. calcium and magnesium work in tandem for heart and bone and teeth health and to support a healthy neural and digestive system.

      without sufficient calcium in your system you will never effectively assimilate your iron supplies and would thus be displaying all the symptoms of iron deficiency anemia ie ~ fatigue and exhaustion, dizzy spells, headaches … nasty nasty headaches too ….. paleness of skin, excessive feelings of being cold …….. so long as the B complex you are taking has all the B’s in it ie ~ B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12 and folic acid etc…. then you should see a vast improvement simply by eating more green vegies ……. even fruits such as oranges and carrotts are rich in calcium ….. ditch the sodas, pop and soft drinks too if you drink any as they’ll only disrupt the calcium phosphorus balance in your body and leach the calcium straight from your bones…….. coffee and tea will inhibit calcium’s absorption so drink it 3 hours apart from your meals and cut right back on it ifyou drink any.

      truly, eat two bowlfulls of green vegies a day …. one with lunch and one with dinner and tell me you don’t feel heaps better.

      peace baby

  27. QUESTION:
    Is it worth having a baby with diabetes and high blood pressure?
    Before you answer I should tell you a little bit about myself. I am 24 years old and my fiance and I want to try to have a baby in another year or so. The problem is I have Juvenile Diabetes and High Blood Pressure. I lost a little girl in April 2005 because I got pregnant and had no idea until 2 months into the pregnancy. I lost my daughter at 5 months. I know in order to have a healthy baby I need to be put on high blood pressure medicine that wont affect the baby and that I also I have to get good control over my sugar levels at least 6 months before attempting to get pregnant. Are there any women out there who have had both diabetes and blood pressure during pregnancy that can give me some advice? I am terrified of doing something wrong!

    • ANSWER:
      I had a baby boy 9 months ago. When I first became pregnant it was a surprise. (I was under the impression that I was unable to have babies…but that’s another subject.) My boyfriend and I were very excited. I was 34 at that time I have Juvenile Diabetes(20 years) and High Blood Pressure. So I was very scared. But I really wanted this baby I was gifted to be carrying. So I got the help of a Nutritionist, Diabetic educator, A high risk OBGYN …oh, and lots of books. I was able to keep my sugars right on target because I had to call my doc every two weeks at first then every week. It’s ok when you’re pregnant to eat more as long as you do it right, and your doctors will help you with your insulin because you body goes through so many changes. And they are always keeping an eye on your baby. Diabetics have large babies. Mine was 9lbs 13oz and 23in.(he was 3 weeks early too. lol!) As for my blood pressure, in the beginning they changed my med. to “Lebetalol ” which is suppose to be ok when your pregnant as far as blood pressure meds go. Then in my second trimester they took me off my blood pressure med because I didn’t need it, my pressure went down for that part of my pregnancy (this doesn’t happen for everyone). In my third trimester I swelled up really bad. I became preeclamptic, my pressure went really high as my due date got closer. It was very scary, for most of my third trimester I was taking it very easy. I had to do alot of sitting and resting. In the end I had a very health baby boy, and I have no health problems due to the pregnancy…other then, my knees are a little shot from the weight I gained, but I have lost almost all of my baby weight because alot of it was water weight from the preeclampsia. Ok, I said alot…just hope I have helped. Take care and good luck to you.

  28. QUESTION:
    Copper IUD’s, what is your experience with them?
    I’m going to the ob-gyn in a few weeks for the first time. I’m behind, I SHOULD have gone years ago, because I am 21 and have been sexually active (on & off) since I was 16. So, but anyways the main reason why I am going is because I really don’t want to get pregnant, and also I want to make my boyfriend more comfortable, luckily we haven’t had any slip ups and I have not even been late, but still I rather feel much better. Part of the reason why I am looking up IUD’s is because I have Cystic Fibrosis and Cystic Fibrosis related diabetes(well controlled). I know with CF I can take BC pills, but with my diabetes, I heard the hormones make blood sugar levels go up, and I know there is low-dose pills, but I seriously would rather not take anymore medications period. So, I am looking into IUD’s, oh yeah, also…I am part of a research study for a new drug, so part of the study is preventing pregnancy if you are sexually active, so yes that’s pretty dang important as well.
    I guess I just wanted to hear from users…what their input is.
    1. What side effects do you think IUD use gave you?
    2. Can your partner feel the device?
    3. Do you notice the IUD?
    4. Do most health care providers carry this product?
    5. Did your health insurance cover this? (I have blue cross & blue shield)

    So mainly, I am the most interested in using this form of birth control because of my other health issues, and also it seems like the least goof-proof. Please, any thoughts or concerns would be greatly appreciated.
    ***oh yeah…the only other reason why I want to go hormone free is because my mom had breast cancer, and it was estrogen-fed carcinoma. She never took birth control, had kids early (at 20 & 25), breastfed, always very skinny….and she still got breast cancer at 46. So…yeah…I rather not tamper with family history.

    • ANSWER:
      I’ve never been a big fan of copper – I recommend mirena instead. Its fairly side effect free and most partners can’t feel it. You will notice it for a week or two, and then loose track of it. And yes, most health providers and most insurance providers cover/carry it.

  29. QUESTION:
    Please help me? Whats wrong with my health? Im 16?
    Ok im 16. Lately ive been getting really dizzy throughout the day. I noticed when i ate something it go better and stress making it worse. I have a nonalcoholic fatty liver so i hope nothing is going on. Its like i feel faint. I wake up with headaches. I feel irritable and have fatigue on and off not too bad tho. Im also peeing more than usual. Theres no chance im pregnant please help me what could this be? Me and my bf are worrying sick and im making an appointment with y doc. Thank you and also i check my blood sugar levels and they are normal? And ive also gained weight but i stopped birth control 2 months ago. Please anyone with these similar symptoms? Not much weight tho only like 6 pounds or so. And i know im not oregnant because i had sex august 9th. I took emergency contraseptive. I got my period august 24-28. I took a pregnancy test september first and it came out negtive and it had a sensativity of 25. Please what could be wrong with me? And i also feel like i have a cough and congestion.

    • ANSWER:
      since you already know that you have a fatty liver
      having a low fat diet is important.
      NO pizza, fried chicken, french fries, burgers.
      take fish oil supplement and weed thistle will help rejuvenate you.
      you will feel better

  30. QUESTION:
    What’s wrong with me? Pregnant, all in my head, or maybe an internal problem?
    First off, I’m sorry about the spelling, trying to type fast to explain everything as fast as I can. Don’t want to get too lengthy. I’m sexually active and use condoms only. I went off the pill in Oct of ’09 and my period has not been regular since. In Nov. I had it for a week (normal), Dec. I had it for three days and it was brown in color and four days early, Jan. my period was two weeks late (stayed for 5 days and was light and pink to start and then brown in color). Went to doctors and they said I wasn’t pregnant and that everything in Pap was ok. My blood sugar levels are ok, my colesterol was good, and thyroid was good. Feb, my period was a week early and was heavy for a week (red then went to pink) then light for another week (pink in color). March, I had period for three days and it was pink and light but was a week late. Now for April it’s a week early and barely there – hardly anything noticable, but is brown in color and it lasted for three days only. I took a HPT last week before my brown (barely there) period started, but I’m going to take another pregnancy test next week. I don’t like not having a normal period, but yet my doctor said since I’m 34 and over weight the pill (or any birth control for that matter) doesn’t work anymore for me. I would love to be pregnant for the first time! I have been having these headaches lately too. They don’t hurt, but I feel the pressure accross my forhead. I feel like I’m getting sick but don’t ever puke. The sickness goes away after I get out of work. It’s kind of funny how that happens. LOL I also feel bloated two or three days out of the week, and for the past two weeks or so I have felt not hungry all day long, but yet I eat and then feel really full after the first couple of bites, but still keep eating, cause I know I need to. My stumache is grumbling and sounds and acts hungry, but really I’m not. I drink lots of water now, which I never really use to. Pee like every hour! And I’m not loosing weight!
    Can anyone tell me what’s going on with me, or if I’m going insane? :)
    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:

  31. QUESTION:
    Please help big health emergency? Im 16?
    Ok im 16. Lately ive been getting really dizzy throughout the day. I noticed when i ate something it go better and stress making it worse. I have a nonalcoholic fatty liver so i hope nothing is going on. Its like i feel faint. I wake up with headaches. I feel irritable and have fatigue on and off not too bad tho. Im also peeing more than usual. Theres no chance im pregnant please help me what could this be? Me and my bf are worrying sick and im making an appointment with y doc. Thank you and also i check my blood sugar levels and they are normal? And ive also gained weight but i stopped birth control 2 months ago. Please anyone with these similar symptoms? Not much weight tho only like 6 pounds or so. And im sure im not pregnant cause i got my period that was heavy and lasted about 4-5 days and i took a pregnancy test 4 days after my period that had a sesstivity of 25 and it came out negative. Please help me?

    • ANSWER:

  32. QUESTION:
    What could possibly be wrong with me? Please docot advice or any please?
    Ok im 16. Lately ive been getting really dizzy throughout the day. I noticed when i ate something it go better and stress making it worse. I have a nonalcoholic fatty liver so i hope nothing is going on. Its like i feel faint. I wake up with headaches. I feel irritable and have fatigue on and off not too bad tho. Im also peeing more than usual. Theres no chance im pregnant please help me what could this be? Me and my bf are worrying sick and im making an appointment with y doc. Thank you and also i check my blood sugar levels and they are normal? And ive also gained weight but i stopped birth control 2 months ago. Please anyone with these similar symptoms? Not much weight tho only like 6 pounds or so. And i know im not pregnant cause i had sex august 9th he didnt come in me an i took emergency contraseptive within the 72 hour limit. My last period was july 24th and i got my period on august 24th of this month. Then tody and threedays ago i took a pregnancy test and they both came out negative. Please help :’(

    • ANSWER:

  33. QUESTION:
    Do think it is even worth going to a dietician for gestational diabetes at this point in my pregnancy?
    I am currently 37 weeks pregnant. I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 33 weeks. I have since learned to manage my own diet from help on the Internet and have also learned how to take my own blood sugar and have been sending my levels to the doctor twice a week. My blood sugars have been great and i haven’t had a hard time keeping them under control. That being said I have been trying to get an appt with a dietitian since I found out and I could not get an appt till tomm. I’m already 2cm dilated and having alot of pressure and contractions. Inhave to drive myself to the place tomm which is not that close to where I live. I am jus wondering if you think it is even worth it at this point? I am feeling very uncomfortable and really just want to stay home and relax but feel guilty. What do you think?

    • ANSWER:

  34. QUESTION:
    2 Wks late & AF is a no-show. Negative Preg results. What could be wrong?
    Me & my fiancee have been trying 2 get pregnant. I stopped my birth control in early September. & I was told that it takes a few months 2 get back 2 a regular cycle. I had a period in November & my last 1 was Dec. 29th. I havent had a period since. I should have ovulated around January 12th. That whole week we had sex 2 try 2 conceive.

    I’ve had 3 pregnancy tests so far. 2 urine & 1 blood. All negative. But I’ve been told by several people that even the blood tests can be wrong for a little while with some girls. I’m always sleepy, hungry, & moody. I did gain a little weight but within the last week I’ve lost 5 lbs. My gram said u always lose a little wt before u gain all the baby wt.

    My dr is doing another blood preg test just make sure. She’s also checking my hormone levels make sure I’m still ovulating. Checking my thyroid, blood sugar, & my iron levels see why I’m so sleepy if I’m not pregnant.

    Is it possible that I am pregnant and the tests are wrong?
    No – I havent gained or lost a significant amount of weight.

    No – I havent been overly stressed out.
    Yes – I’m stressed out now bc I dont know what’s wrong with me.

    & like I said I’ve never missed a pd before except when I was pregnant b4 I miscarried.
    Miscarriage was well over 4 years ago so thats not interfering any.
    I’m usually 28-30 days apart.

    I get checked regularly for cysts on my ovaries bc I had one before & they are scared it might come back. I just got checked December 10th. So there’s no cyst there.

    • ANSWER:
      you could have ovulated late and the egg just had not inplanted yet, a hpt wont show until after implantation, or u could be not pregant,alot of women skip periods

  35. QUESTION:
    I had my one hour glucose test, and the nurse called….?
    She said that she wants me to come in and have a three hour test done and my blood sugar is only at 149. With my last pregnancy my blood sugar was at 163 after my one hour test and my doctor didn’t do anything about it. I was never on insulin and we just controlled it through diet. So, I told the nurse that I am not coming in for the test, that I feel it is unnecessary and that I will definitely watch my diet and cut out all sugar and complex carbohydrates. I know that they are not going to put me on insulin at that level and I have to pay out of pocket towards my deductible if I go. My brother is a doctor also and doesn’t seem worried about it at all. So, my question is… Do you think that 149 is high? What was your blood sugar after the one hour test? And did you have to go for a three hour test?
    I guess it’s the ‘cut-off’ levels I really don’t understand. Like Mishele says, her doctors cut-off is 130, my doctors is 140. But my last OB with my first pregnancy, her cut-off was 160. Where do they get these numbers?

    • ANSWER:
      I also had this problem. My doctor wanted one done early (at 11 weeks) and their cut off was 130 and I was 137. They then ordered a 3 hour test and like you I ALSO feel this was unnecessary. So when I went to the perinatologist last week they asked if I had scheduled it and I told them no. The one hour test seemed like eons and I’ve never had to have a 3 hour test before, so I’m resistant to do it. They said my insulin level was high (i think the norm is up to 15 and I was 17) and they said it’s a sign of early insulin resistance. Puhleeze….. I do not think I’m going to do the 3 hour one unless the repeat one hour one at 18 weeks comes back funky.

  36. QUESTION:
    Pregnant Type 1 Diabetic, Please help,did this happen to you?
    I’ll be 36 weeks tomorrow. Doctor says placenta and baby look fine and happy, besides the baby being 7lbs 9 oz 3 weeks ago! I’ve been having contraction and irritability since week 29, it never goes away. With no other complications. Recently instead of upping my basal levels and trying to keep them under control, like that which is common among third trimester pregnancy’s , my blood sugars have been constantly low! The other night was the scariest when I caught it at 32, it literally dropped so fast, I didn’t know it was coming. I went to bed with a blood sugar of 85, which is good, but I drank some Hawaiian punch anyway because I’m so afraid of dropping, 20 minutes later, i feel like crap and can’t sleep, my sugar is 54, I drink a chocolate milk which was with the chocolate mix alone 2 Carbs plus the milk was another 22gCHO. 10 minutes later I feel like crap, my blood sugar is 32, I drank 3 1/2 12 oz glasses of OJ. I woke up in the morning with a blood sugar of 47! This is really bizarre for me because since I’ve been diabetic for 7 years, i’m so brittle, I couldn’t smell sugar without my blood sugar rising. The doctor just cut all my basal levels, at night it was 1.9 now it is 0.5 and now at 3:30am, my blood sugar was 45! It’s quite sad. It’s wearing me out and scaring me at the same time. I didn’t even cover my 30g Dinner tonight. Has this happened to any other pregnant woman? Or anyone for that matter?

    • ANSWER:
      Im sorry to hear that sweetie. I just found out that i might have gestational diabetes and im 31 weeks so I dont really know the diff, I wish I knew how you feel when you say you feel like crap cause sometimes i feel weird too…anyways in my opinion,you should call your dr. and talk to a nurse and explain what happened maybe they will call you in, and maybe it has to do withyou almost going into labor idk, when my sister in law was experiencing diff symptoms with her body it was cause she was almost in labor at 37 1/2 wks…I hoppe your baby as it sounds is healthy and god bless…

  37. QUESTION:
    Took a pregnancy test?
    I went to the ER the night before last night because I was dealing with major nausea to the point that my husband thought there was something seriously wrong with me. They had me take a pee test to see if I was pregnant and it came out negative. Since that day, I have been constipated (gross… I know… Embarrassing too.) I took Milk of Magnesium about two hours ago and it has done nothing for me so far. They did not do many tests on me that night, I was there from 12-3:30am, mainly waiting on the slow people. The doctor told me I was a waste of time because they found nothing when they didn’t test my blood and that it is all in my head. Wtf?! They pricked my finger to see my sugar level, that’s it.

    I have been having nausea for three weeks straight, only at night. Some nights it is bad and some nights I am able to handle it. The other night was the worst and it blew my mind that they did not bother to further their examining because now I am dealing with this constipation. My question is, could I be pregnant and the pee tests are not reading it or am I safe? I’m not sure….. I am on birth control as well. I just read up today that pregnant women experience constipation.

    • ANSWER:
      I am sorry you feel so awful! Sometimes pregnant women can feel constipated due to the pregnancy itself, prenatal vitamins with iron(constipating), or unusual diets could also be contributing factors to pregnant women feeling constipated. If you’ve taken pregnancy tests and went to the doctor and they told you you were not pregnant…you probably aren’t. Nausea can be a symptom of many things: medications, infectious illness, vertigo (also dizzy), or other imbalances in your body. Sometimes when people are very constipated it can make them nauseous. I’m a little concerned with your choice of laxative..the official package labeling warns against use in the presence of nausea. If you are losing electrolytes (sodium) and water from vomiting, once the laxative kicks in, it may relieve your constipation but you will also lose more water and electrolytes going the other way. Make sure to drink plenty of water. Other ways to relieve and prevent constipation is to eat plenty of fiber (metamucil wafers, fruit (apples) and veggies, whole grain breads, beans) and get regular exercise. Nausea for three weeks must be awful if you can’t eat or drink without feeling sick. Even though the doctor at the emergency room was so quick to dismiss you, he is used to dealing with life-threatening emergencies and was in to much of hurry to comfort you. ER’s are notorious for being fast paced and interested in pressing matters. You should definitley make an appointment with a primary doctor (if you can a gastroenterologist–expert in tummy trouble). A primary doctor can also test you for pregnancy for a definitive answer. I really hope your nausea and constipation are relieved quickly

  38. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had the Gestational Diabetes test in the first trimester?
    I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes during my first pregnancy. It was easily controlled with diet (I actually never had high blood sugars in all the time I was testing). Due to that diagnosis, it is requested that I take the test during the first trimester of my current second pregnancy. I am wondering if my glucose readings are abnormal this time around in the one hour test if I will be required to take the 3 hour challenge test, or if “failing” one will be sufficient for a diagnosis. I don’t mind regularly checking my blood glucose levels, but I’d like to not sit through the three hour test since it does make me queasy and ill. Since they know I have a history of this, might they let me off at the first test if it comes back abnormal?

    • ANSWER:
      They usually try to have you just do the 3-hour in the first trimester if you’re at a high risk of gestational diabetes. If they ask you to do a 1-hour, and you fail, then they will make you do a 3-hour, generally. But, it’s probably just easier to do a 3-hour if you are at higher risk. If I were you, I’d ask to just do a 3-hour without bothering with the 1-hour. That’s what I did!

  39. QUESTION:
    How frustrating it is to control diet and feel hungry during pregnancy…?
    I have been diagnosed with impaired glucose tolerance ( A step down to Gestational diabetes). I am 34 weeks pregnant and this was diagnosed at 31 weeks.
    My OBs doesn’t think I need to control diet except reducing sugar intake. ( I don’t take much sugar anyway)
    However my endocrinologist think I should be strict with my diet and monitor blood glucose level twice a day two hours after meal, which I have been doing for fast few days.

    When I started to measure blood glucose after meals I realised in order to maintain it below 7 mmol/l ( the upper level of normal range) I nearly have to starve my self. I constantly feel hungry and uncomfortable.

    Please give any advices guys, if you have been diagnosed before with gestational diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, how did you cope?

    If you can list down or provide a link for a sample meal plan that would be great.

    Thanks in advance for your responses.

    • ANSWER:
      Ok..I can tell you how frustrating it has been and if you’d like someone to chat with, feel free to contact me via this email address: jo.vantreese@carrier.utc.com.

      I failed my 1 hour glucose tolerance test at week 26, went back at week 28 for the 3 hour, failed it miserably! So, the next day I was at a dietician’s office where I was given a pretty strict diet to follow. It was basically:
      Breakfast: 2 carbs, 1 protien, 1 fat
      AM snack: 1 carb, 1 protein
      Lunch: 3 carbs, 2 proteins, 2 fats
      Snack: 1 carb, 1 protein
      Dinner: 4 carbs, 3 proteins, 2 fats
      PM snack: 1 carb, 1 protein

      After about 2 weeks of that diet and a visit to my doctors office, my blood sugar was getting higher and I was belly growling hungry at every meal and snack! I talked to my doctor and my dietician. (oh, I’d lost 2 pounds as well at week 32 w/only a 15 pound total weight gain at week 30).

      My dietician increased my calories from 1800 to 2400 and added a carb at lunch and atleatst 1 protein, a carb at dinner and a protein, and a carb and protein at both afternoon snacks.

      My belly has been very satisfied, however my sugar is still a little high. I was put on a pill to control my diabetes, but in my opinion it’s not doing that great of a job, but they are not raising it yet.

      Really…if you want someone to chat with email me. That’s my work email so I only answer during the day, not at night.

  40. QUESTION:
    Pregnant with diabetes and I am confused about my readings?
    I was diagnosed with diabetes in March this year. I am pregnant 6 weeks along. I wasn’t controlling my diabetes at all. I have tried for over 2 yrs to conceive baby 3. The other 2 were so easy. We feel so blessed and want this pregnancy to be the best experience ever. I was 4 weeks along when I found out I was pregnant and that’s when I got my wake up call for being a diabetic. I am now on insulin shot’s 4 times a day. The 4th being before I go to bed it is a longer lasting insulin for night time. So my question is that I take insulin before I eat and then I test my blood sugar 1 hr after I start eating my meal.Some of the time they are under 135. But every other day I’ll have a reading 1 hr after of about 154. Then I test again an hour after that which is 2 hr after the start of the meal and my levels are like 98. Because by then the insulin has really taken affect. Is this normal. If I up my dosage any more then at the 2nd hour my blood sugar will drop to low that I feel light headed and have to have juice. Any advice. Will my baby be o.k. like this?

    • ANSWER:
      I would say you are perfectly fine. Your numbers are normal. I see no damage going to happen to baby , if you keep doing as you are.

      Try a low Glycemic Index Diet And exercise every day.

      http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm

      Good luck to you and the baby.

      Tin

  41. QUESTION:
    36 wks with Gestational Diabetes…insulin fears?
    Hi, I am almost 36 wks pregnant with gestational diabetes. Once I was diagnosed, I was able to quickly work my diet to get my blood sugars at the proper level, so I would not need insulin. A few weeks ago, I started getting highs after my breakfast test (with even one serving of carbs). So I started eliminating carbs from breakfast. I usually have a protein shake with soymilk for breakfast and a few pieces of turkey sausage, and then after my morning bg test I will have a piece of peanut butter toast or fruit. My question is, now my lunch numbers are becoming more sensitive and if I have my max carbs (which my dietician said was ok since I was carb-free for breakfast), my bg levels are over, usually in the 140′s. My dietician now wants me to go on insulin. My doc has seen my bg readings for the last 2 weeks and didn’t seem so concerned. I would love to get through these last few weeks (I only have three because I am having a scheduled cesarean at 39wks) without having to prod myself further and give a shot every morning. What should I do? As of now, I am waiting to see my doc next week before making a final decision. I don’t really want to give myself a shot every day, but of course, baby comes first and I want to do what is best. I have not gained very much weight this pregnancy, but my baby is gaining and measuring average. Any expert advice? Go for the insulin or try to control more carbs? I don’t want to be on the Atkins diet while prego, that can’t be good for baby. Thanks:)

    • ANSWER:
      Just go on the insulin. It makes control much easier and will take some of the stress off of you. It is for your good health as well as the babies. I went on insulin and wish I had done it a lot sooner, because now I have good BS levels almost all of the time. You should also know that 65% of women that have had gestational diabetes end up developing type 2 later in life. So keep an eye on things even after you have the baby.

  42. QUESTION:
    Will Metformin Make Me More Fertile?
    Hello all. My husband and I are planning to start trying for another baby next April, but I’ve got a question about the Metformin (Glucophage) that I take. I’ve read that it’s sometimes used to treat infertility, especially women with PCOS.
    But I don’t have PCOS, and I’m very fertile on my own (3 kids) I’m taking the metformin for actual blood sugar issues. Thing is, I don’t want to be any more fertile than I am.
    Does the metformin only help women with PCOS because it helps smooth out hormone levels, or does it treat actual infertility by stimulating ovulation? The last thing I need is a litter! lol With 3 kids already, I don’t even want this to be twins. Should I quit taking the metformin before I try to conceive?
    And I’ve read it can’t be taken during the actual pregnancy, how will I control my blood sugar if I have to go off of it?
    Thanks in advance for your help! :)

    • ANSWER:
      it just helps women with pcos ovulate normally, you will not ovulate any more than usual. ask your doctor to make sure.

  43. QUESTION:
    Need help, feeling hopeless and angry with Diabetic fiancée who isn’t taking proper care, What do I do?
    About 9 months ago, my girl and I decided we were ready to see about having a baby. This involved seeing a doctor and getting blood tests. About April 2010, I had been involved in a Diabetes campaign at work and had learned about the symptoms and recognized my girl had several of them. I carefully addressed these concerns to her and finally after a long talk and me begging and pleading she agreed to get tested. So back to the blood tests, the fertility doctor looked at the results and says she is sure my girl has Diabetes. Then the doc says, she has to see an endocrine doctor and get it under control and get cleared before we can go any further with fertility/making a baby. To this news, when the doctor left the room, my girl said she knew it. Not that she had been diagnosed prior to this, but that she had suspected diabetes long before I knew enough to recognize the symptoms.
    It upset me a bit, that this woman who I’m planning on spending the rest of my life with, is not so attuned or caring about her health as she should be in my opinion. But having a baby is super important to her, so she got right on making the appointment with the Endocrinologist and got diagnosed and treatment plan. 1 Pill and 2 types of insulin later, she is supposed to check her sugars regularly, measure and count carbs, be conscious of her diet and inject sliding scale insulin to keep her sugar levels right… First 3 months, she did soooo great! I was proud and helpful. She seemed to master it and when I forgot (which I’m terribly forgetful) she always took care of it, and I got comfortable assuming she would handle it herself.

    Then we got the news in November that she was almost ready to be cleared for pregnancy, but at this point we have decided that its too expensive and we need to be more financially ready, so I went back to college to prepare for a higher paying job. So the baby is on the back burner, and suddenly she is not checking her sugar, forgetting her insulin, conveniently not mentioning anything to me, and getting mad at me when I do remind her.

    What do I do?

    We are getting married in less than 2 months and I am angry with her that she is not taking care of herself.

    We are sitting on the couch, watching TV as I contemplate studying, she’s eating a Hershey bar and I don’t say anything until we get up to go to bed and I realize I didn’t see her check her sugar. I ask her did she check her sugar today playfully. She says yes as if she’s not serious. So, I ask if she’s lying to me. She says No, big grin on her face. I walk into the kitchen and she’s laughing at me and i look in her purse for her test kit to check and its not there. I ask where it is, she’s like “I don’t know.” I ask when she last saw it, she does that I’m guilty but I’m adorable thing girls do and says 3 days ago.

    I lost it, in my head. I just kind of went blank on my face and kept thinking, this is a joke, she’s messing with me.

    I say for real? She was serious, I ask her where is her back up test kit, if it was still in the car. She says its at work. I’m just in disbelief.

    I’m marrying this woman and she’s not even concerned enough with her health to check her sugar. Since she isn’t checking her sugar, she also isn’t giving herself sliding scale insulin. Just her long acting Lantus and pill Metformin. She’s relying on those to get her by. But then she’s been tired, lethargic, and always has a headache.

    We are in the middle of a fight right now, because I’m upset she’s not taking care of herself. And I’m worried this is going to be an ongoing pattern. I think she would be upset if the shoe were on the other foot. I’m just want her to be as healthy as she can be. I worry about complications. I have to drag her to the eye doctor and dentist. I literally had to force her to get glasses, meaning I brought her there, she got an exam and then I picked out frames, etc and paid for it even though she said she’d never wear them. She wears shoes that hurt her feet. I buy her new shoes. I check her feet often (she doesn’t realize I’m doing it, because I’m just rubbing her feet which she likes.)

    What do I do? I love her, but I don’t want her to suffer later for her recklessness in her 20s.
    And I want to grow OLD together, not grow middle aged, lose my wife to complications from unmanaged diabetes. Its stupid and careless. And absolutely upsetting me.

    I just need advice on what has helped/worked with other people in similar situations.

    • ANSWER:
      Forget about growing old together. You will be around , but she will be long gone. Unless someone with diabetes stops the denial , there would be no thoughts about marrying. You would be taking on a great debt to start with. Diabetes is not cheap. Also if you had a baby , how could you be sure that she did not go into a coma and the baby had no one to care for it.

      She has not matured enough for responsibility of marriage and motherhood.
      Only thing you could do is get all her friends and family together and have a professional mental health person pull an intervention on her.
      If she doesn’t take the hint , then moving on is in order. I also detest the lying. How will you ever trust her. This is not a game or a laughing matter. This is life or death. Not just for her but your life will be miserable.

      You need some time away.

      Take care , And I am really deeply sorry about your predicament.

      Tin

  44. QUESTION:
    Gestational diabetes, no test strips, diet?
    I’m having problems with my insurance company not covering my test strips. They said they can only cover a certain amount a month so I cannot get any more for 2 and a half weeks. I see the doctor again 6 days before I can get a re-fill. I know the doctor is going to be mad. I cannot measure my blood glucose if I don’t have strips! I have argued with them and I have spoken to a nurse at my doctor’s office and she told me just to follow the diet and go and buy some test strips. Sorry, lady, they are 0 a box and I cannot afford that! I need an oil delivery at my house! Anyway, how would you know if your blood sugar is too high or too low? I’ve been keeping it well under control, but now that I have no test strips I cannot monitor my levels. Has anything like this ever happened to anyone on here? What did you do? I’m worried the doctor will put me on insulin or something just because he cannot monitor my levels and there is nothing I can really do about it! I haven’t needed insulin at all, and I don’t think I will, but what can I do? Also, did any of you have to change your diets at all as pregnancy progresses? I’m 33 weeks now, and I’ve been on this GD diet for close to four weeks and my levels have been generally in the same area, and I always keep to my diet. Could the diet change? Like, say you can have up to 45g of carbs for all three meals which I do, but then at say week 35, could this change to where you can only have 30? That 45 is too much? I can’t explain what I mean, hopefully someone can understand my rambling! Haha. Thanks in advance if you can answer!!
    I do stay on top of it, I eat exactly as the diet tells me to and I follow it all perfectly. I cannot afford them, regardless of the reason. Nobody can, diabetes is highway robbery.
    I’m looking into the ReliOn right now, thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I didn’t have GD, but I still had to go on a low carb diet because I somewhat failed the second test. (you know how they draw your blood 4 times, well, my blood sugar came back a little bit high on one of the blood tests) Your diet will remain the same for the remainder of your pregnancy. I am sure if you stick to your diet, everything will be fine.

      One thing though is that when you start early labor, screw that diet! You need those carbs for energy. I stuck to the diet and the nurses had my husband buy powerade for me to drink because they said I needed the carbs.

  45. QUESTION:
    Gestational Diabetes?
    Hi,

    I am in my 19th week of my pregnancy and took the Glucose test 2 days before. The report shows the sugar level as 124 mg/dl.
    I took that GCT in the evening without fasting after having 50gm of glucose . I gave the blood sample one hour later after having the glucose.

    Kindly let me know whether it is too high?
    How to control this level if it is too high.

    Thanks in Advance

    • ANSWER:
      Gestational diabetes: Checking your blood sugar
      If you have gestational diabetes, you need to know when your blood sugar level is outside the safe range. Fortunately, you can see what your blood sugar level is anywhere and anytime by using a home blood sugar meter. Within a minute or two, you can know what your blood sugar level is.

      Key points
      Knowing your blood sugar level helps you treat low or high blood sugar before it becomes an emergency.
      Knowing your blood sugar level also helps you know how exercise and food affect your blood sugar and how much insulin to take (if you take insulin).
      Checking your blood sugar helps you feel more in control of your diabetes during your pregnancy.
      Four keys to success in monitoring your blood sugar are:
      Keep your meter and supplies with you at all times.
      Make it a habit to check your blood sugar level. Build it into your routine.
      Prick the sides of your fingers, not the tips. The tip of a finger is more sensitive than its sides.
      Check your blood sugar meter’s accuracy when you visit your doctor. Compare your results with your doctor’s results.

      http://diabetes.webmd.com/home-blood-sugar-monitoring-when-you-have-gestational-diabetes#tp17112

  46. QUESTION:
    Please answer if you know about gestational diabetes UK?
    I have been diabetic my whole life and have managed to keep good blood glucose levels with diet and metphormin.

    I am now just over 5 months pregnant and have been on insulin since about week 8 of my pregnancy. I was speaking to a friend today who is type 2 diabetic and just had a baby who also went on insulin during her pregnancy.

    She was shocked to learn that my insulin dosage with meals is about 40 units (she was only on 12units with meals by the time she gave birth)

    I guess my question is IS 40 units an abnormally high dosage for 5 months pregnant? I was told by my doctor that my dosage would go up and up throughout the pregnancy, I control my own dosage but he didn’t clarify whether I am on track and I haven’t see him for a month and don’t have an appointment for another 2 weeks.

    I have also been having hypos the last 2 weeks. Could this be related to my high dosage of insulin? My readings an hour after my meals are normally between 6.5 and 8.0 but sometimes within 2 or 3 hours I will drop as low as 2.1.

    I don’t eat extra large portions and have not gained much weight with the pregnancy. I try to stick to brown bread and don’t eat sugary things. I eat plenty of veg and try to have 1 or two portions of fruit (usually bananas or apples) everyday. If the pregnancy cravings are driving me insane I have a packet of crisps, diet coke or toast with low sugar jam. I do occasionally have more than two portions of fruit if I have a hypo.

    Is there any other pregnant diabetic out there with a similar experience or concerns? I feel a little worried my dosage is so drastically higher than my friends was when she was so much further along. Should I be aiming for a lower dosage?

    Also if this matters, my nighttime dosage is much lower at 14 units. Sometimes I have a hypo in the middle of the night and keep chocolate by my bed for when this happens.

    • ANSWER:
      It doesn’t matter what anyone else’s requirements are.
      It is YOUR body. Not theirs.
      If you are having hypos, you need to cut back though.
      You need to see your doctor or diabetes nurse as low sugars are dangerous for the baby’s development (high sugars also affect the baby).
      Satisfying the odd craving is ok too as long as your sugars don’t go too high.
      Be careful with the caffeine in the diet coke. It will stimulate the baby.
      Good luck

  47. QUESTION:
    Could labor be induced if ?………………… Please help!?
    Ok this is my situation, im 32 week and 3 days I have diabetes, type 2 ,my pancrus work off and on, i take insulin and i also take pills and diet to control my levels, but since i hit my 7th month my levels wont get under control, i am eating the same way i was before and am taking higher doses of meds then i use to, but it is simpaly not working, my question is can this affect my baby this far alone in pregnancy and if so can i request for my pregnancy to be induced for thr safty of my baby, i have had two previous miscarriages and i would just die if something happened to this baby this far along in pregnancy i am very concerned for my unborn childs well being, also i went to go my ultrasound two weeks ago and the doctor says that she is measuring the size of a 3 month old and weighs 5lbs, and 8 oz already, if my blood sugars are staying out of control, that means i cant have a c-section if she is too big, so can you please help i dont know what to do my nerves are on edge. HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      I’m so sorry you are going through such a tough time….

      I gave birth to my first child 8 weeks ago and had Gestational Diabetes. When you have diabetes, your sugar levels automatically go out of control because of the baby’s placenta – it lowers your insulin levels. I had to increase my insulin dosages every week because of changing hormones.

      My doctor induced my labor 4 days before my due date – with Diabetes, they will not let you go past your due date; however, 32 weeks is far too early. Your baby’s lugs aren’t fully developed yet, so you want to keep her in as long as possible. Don’t worry, she is not the size of a 3 month old – 5 pounds 8 oz. is totally normal for 32 weeks! She’s a little on the big size, so she might weigh 9 pounds when you hit full term, but a lot of people deliver 9 pounds babies!

      By following the diabetic diet and taking my insulin, my daughter was born at 7 pounds 1 ounce. Don’t let those doctors scare you, you and your baby girl will be just fine! =)

      Oh, be sure to ask for non-stress tests once a week (maybe even twice a week). It checks your baby’s movements and heart rate, if she passes those tests, then she’s doing perfectly in there, and there’s no need to induce. If you can keep her in to at least 37 weeks, you’ll both be a lot better off!

  48. QUESTION:
    Honeymoon phase of diabetes?
    I have been a type 2 diabetic for about 10 years following a serious bout of pancreatitis. At first my blood sugars were bad, some fasting values of over 400, but as it wore on I got a little better and just needed to control it with diet and exercise.

    Whenever I got pregnant I would have to go on insulin, after the births my levels would get better.

    Now I’m pregnant again, at the beginning of my pregnancy I went on insulin and oddly had to stop, 2 hours after a meal my levels would drop to 40. Now I act like I’m not a diabetic anymore, which is very strange for me now that I’m nearing the 7th month. By now I’m usually on a pretty large dose of 2 different insulins, but I don’t need anything now.

    My endocrinologist said he thinks my pancreas is working overtime for some reason, we’ll have more testing when I go back. He said most people recover from post pancreatitis diabetes within a few months, but I’ve hung onto this for 10 years.

    Has anyone experienced anything like this and what happened? My fasting levels now are usually 78-90 and 2 hours after a meal its about 90-100. If I am in the honeymoon phase, how long will this last since I’m older (31) doesn’t it last longer?
    He does an A1C every visit. It’s excellent most times.

    • ANSWER:
      Your endo should be doing an A1C on you, not just an overnight fasting or after meals. An A1C checks the average level for about three months. I hope you have recovered from the pancreatitis though and can go off the insulin altogether.

  49. QUESTION:
    Could this be a diabetes warning, Some thing else, or Nothing at all? (Also Pregnant)?
    What it is:
    I’ve been feeling like I have a fever (tired eyes, cold things almost feel weird to touch, and my skins chilled but the inside of me feels hot) but my temp is just fine. Also I’ve been having this Vertigo-ish type feeling, not necessarily dizzy, but like, slight dizzyness mixed in with a feeling that i just can’t seem to focus my eyes right. I’ve heard a few diabetics talk about this, And Diabetes runs rampant through both sides of my family, Here’s another reason I worry

    During my first pregnancy when they make you drink all that glucose stuff to see if you have diabetes, If you throw up or your sugar level goes high, it’s supposed to mean that you very well may have it. I did throw up, but the nurse didn’t have the time to retest so I never got accurate results. (Granted I also had Hypermesis but had it under control at the time) During labor my blood pressure dropped low enough that they had to give me medication, and I was super cold. I always seem to be cold now, even when everyone else is warm

    Some people have told me it could be a blood pressure problem too, or just simply the fact that I never drink water (Though I have started to now that I found out I am preggo with little one number 2) And it could be really bad dehydration. Any Thoughts? I’m 21.
    Some nurses actually do come on here, but I’m only asking for opinions. And thank you to everyone who answered me honestly.
    Also, I’m about 2 months in with #2

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same symptoms early in both my pregnancies. Though my doctor thought it was due to Gestational Diabetes, I tested out only borderline with my first. I too have Type II in my family as well. It was found to be caused by my high blood pressure. Though it went away around the 5 month with my first and the 2nd month with my second. I would go back and have them test you again for the 3 hour and explain to them you need to drink much slower than the 5 minute allotment. Sometimes having to drink that pure sugar crap is just too hard for pregnant women. I got so ill but managed to keep it down the 2 times they made me do it.

  50. QUESTION:
    Got my sugars under control after insulin….so why do I feel so bad?
    I’m 11 weeks pregnant, and a diabetic. My endocrinologist decided to start me on Levemir starting dose 5 units in the morning (its usually dosed at night but because of my history of hypoglycemia he figured it was best to dose in the morning).

    It has really improved my numbers, my fasting sugars aren’t super low anymore, and I see more balance in my blood glucose levels. The first day I was on it, I felt better immediately. But now, I feel horrible. My sugars are great, 109 before meals.

    I felt just fine until my second day on this insulin. I’ve taken Novolin before, with my last pregnancy and didn’t ever feel bad. Am I having an allergic reaction to it, or is it normal to feel this way at first?

    I feel a little depressed, so daggone tired and grouchy, like my sugars were high then crashed, but like I said, my numbers haven’t been this good since the last time I was on insulin.

    I almost want to stop the insulin and tell him to please put me back on Novolin.

    • ANSWER:
      You really should discuss how you are feeling with him and go from there. I had an allergic reaction to insulin once and what happened was a little red itchy bump like a mosquito bit at my injection site other than that I’m not sure what kind of reaction one might have if allergic to insulin. Hope this Helps and you feel better soon.


Controlling Blood Sugar Levels Through Diet

In my earlier articles, I covered information about diabetes, its symptoms and how to prevent diabetes. So without going into much detail about diabetes, I will provide what fruits a diabetic person can eat and keep his blood sugar level controlled in this article.

Diabetic patients are always worried about choosing what they can eat and what they cannot, as they have to keep their blood sugar level under control. Many patients can not enjoy eating fruits because of their high sugar content. But fortunately, there are many fruits that a person suffering with diabetes can enjoy and can keep his blood sugar level controlled and to some extent even cure diabetes.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    High blood sugar levels 14 or 15 at bedtime, but eats very little through out the day?
    My mother is 81 and has diabeites uses pills and diet not insulin to control her blood sugar levels, with her diet she eats very little and her blood sugur levels will be 14 or 15 at bed time sometimes,what would cause this. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      The author means high blood sugar. Europeans use a different scale than Americans for measuring blood sugar. Their 14 or 15 blood sugar is about the same as 260 for us.

      http://diabeticgourmet.com/Tools_and_Calculators/convert-sugar-readings.shtml

      As for the original question… It could be stress, wearing off of the pills, or a rebound where the body fights to increase it’s bloodsugar because it is too low. You should probably consult a doctor who is familiar with your mother.

      Good Luck!

  2. QUESTION:
    how can i control better my blood sugar levels?
    Okay so I’m 17 year old (female) and i have type 1 diabetes. I was diagnosed at age 11. The thing is i wanna know if while i’m on my period does it affect my blood sugar levels. I notice when im in that time of the month my blood sugar levels spike from 214 up to 450. I hate it when my blood sugar is really high it makes me feel sick. Another thing is that when im not on my period my bloodsugar sometimes spikes. I do exercise and i also think that im using alot of insulin for my age. I follow my diet plan very strictly but sometimes i eat less and i dont eat my snacks to prevent my blood sugar from getting high. It worries me because i have to eat little(which makes me weak sometimes),exercise more, and use alot of insulin just so my blood sugar can be from 130-180 a day and sometimes it goes to 300. My goal is to be able to have these blood sugar levels through out the day (from 80 up to 120).Another thing that worries me is that i can’t do too much exercise because i have a hip condition and my doctor says that i have to rest. I dont expect for my blood sugar levels to be perfect but i just want to able to control them better.

    • ANSWER:
      Based upon the information that you have provided your diabetes is poorly controlled. You really need to work with your physician and a diabetic nurse educator to gain control of your disease. There is no disease where patient education is more important that diabetes. There have been several studies that have demonstrated that when patients are in control of their diabetes as opposed to their physician being in control that outcomes are better. Being in control means that you should know how to adjust your basal and bolus insulin every 3 to 5 days based upon your glucose readings. If you email me your glucose regimen, typical fasting readings, typical postprandial readings, and typical bedtime readings I will try to provide a more thorough and thoughtful response. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless.

  3. QUESTION:
    Diabetes – When to test blood sugar level?
    I was recently diagnosed with diabetes (controlled through exercise and diet, no meds at this time). I’ve gone to a ton of websites and read literature on diabetes, but cannot find a straight answer about testing my blood sugar.

    For diabetics out there….
    When should I test?
    Should I test after fasting (say after sleeping) or before a meal?
    How soon after a meal should I test?
    How many times a day?

    Thanks for your help! :-)

    • ANSWER:
      Testing for Type 1′s and insulin using Type 2′s is a bit different from your case. Type 1′s need to regularly test to ensure their BG level is not in a dangerous range and adjust their insulin. They may test up to 12x a day is some cases. Type 1′s using an insulin pump usually test often. Most Type 1′s average about 6x per day if they use multiple daily injections.

      If you are a new Type 2, you may want to start on a regular plan just to see how your levels are fluctuating during the day. You aren’t on meds or insulin, so you don’t need to worry about low blood sugar. Your main goal is to make sure you are not running too high and are unaware of it.

      For the first few days, test in the a.m. (fasting), 2 hours after breakfast, before lunch, 2 hours after lunch, before supper, and you guessed it…2 hours after dinner. You may also want to throw in an evening pre-bed check or two.

      You want to see if your fasting (before eating) levels are in range at all meal times, and how your are doing after you eat.

      That way, you will know if you need medication, or just need to adjust your diet (eat less carbs at dinner, for example).

      If all is fairly well, and you are following a healthy diet and exercising, you can test randomly on different days to make sure you are staying in range. If not, call your doctor to see if you need medication.

  4. QUESTION:
    I am 38, recently diabetic, can i use metformin for some time?
    I was prescribed by a doctor tab:metformin 500 twice a day, I do not want to use it for life long, I want diabetes to be controlled through diet and exercises, I want to be on medicine only for some time. Can I discontinue the medicine after some time when the blood sugar levels are below normal levels.

    • ANSWER:
      If you are really dedicated to a Low Glycemic Index diet and daily exercise. By the amount of Metformin you are taking , I would be safe to bet that you can get off this drug in 3 months. And I am dead serious about DEDICATION.

      There are 4 key steps to controlling glucose levels.
      Here are the 4 keys:
      1) Knowledge- http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/index.ph… This is a great site for info
      2) Meds. Metformin to start. Never , ever take Actos or Avandia. They may kill you. Bone fractures, heart problems and what diabetics really don’t need is that they change Bone Stem Cells to Fat Cells.
      3)diet- A low carb diet is in order. I can’t count carbs so I use Mendosa’s Glycemic Index Diet. Great for the whole family. http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm
      4) EXERCISE- Walking is fine but Nordic Walking is Great. Exercise also lowers Glucose levels , lowers Cholesterol and lowers Blood Pressure. Google it.

      I Nordic walk 1 1/2 hours a day. It has lowered my Glucose levels , lowered my Cholesterol and blood pressure. Go for it.
      Take care

      Tin

  5. QUESTION:
    does not eating for 16 hours raise or lower blood sugar?
    borderline diabetic. doc gave me an accucheck meter to monitor and control sugar through diet and life style changes.
    i will see the doc again this friday and discuss my results with him.
    doc has been using blood tests from the lab and an accu check in his office to monitor me several times a year, always close, but never into the diabetic range.

    my level all day stays below 140.
    fasting is out of control. first thing in the morning im averaging 120.
    “Dawn Phenomenon” was suggested in another question, which i wil discus with the doc.

    as an experiment, i did not eat anything for 16 hours. reading was 128.

    can not eating push it up that high?

    should i try several small meals through the day?

    or is my something wrong? have i become a diabetic over night and i cant control this anymore? should i call the doc on monday?

    thanks everyone, this is new to me and im just not sure when it becomes critical and i should worry.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, not eating can raise your blood sugar and it can be dangerous to some people.
      Your eating habits should be consistent. Eat breakfast,a mid morning snack,lunch,afternoon snack, supper and an evening snack.This could be too much for you to do but diabetes is a trial and error disease but not too much error.Monitor your blood whenever your not sure.It’s better to be safe than sorry.Best of health to you!!! Take Care!

  6. QUESTION:
    Pcos which is best?
    if i have pcos and knowing that it can be controlled and made better through diet control,regarding weight loss i know that the GI diet and having low sugar or sutting out refined carbs is advised,but in regards to the wight loss could i still just eat low fat sugar diet and less calories and lose weight? All my friends who have lost weight have just eaten less,i was thinking of eating little and often and not follow what my friend did,as she has been very stressed as she is going through case with social services with her children at mo,so she has just had reduced appetite,and also wanted to lose weight,she was sometimes only having breakfast and then just having a eve meal,or no breakfast at all and eat maybe the odd thing otherwise just eating one meal in the eve,admitidly she lost weight and looks good,but not sure how healthy this is to do,plus i know i could not go all day without food,think this would also be cause of my blood sugar levels and insulin probs due to the pcos
    But is this true even if you are not gaining anymore weight,that i still deserve more help from GP? he has briefly mentioned metformin/not sure what other medicine in uk is equivalent to this or other types,but we do have metformin,my weight is because i also eat badly well over lifetime,not exercised enough,but also cause the effect the pcos has on my body,and problems it causes,also makes weight loss harder,plus i have bad skin,of which he has tried me on a pill i’ve already had before a year ago.i was just taking it then for contraceptive reasons,and we didn’t know i had pcos then. He says it may help with the hormone inbalance?! But am scared about weight gain and acne getting worse as the pill can do this,but have only got 3mth trial then going back to him. In line with taking something for insulin probs and to help weightloss,what else would they implement with this? Eg diet/other advise or necessary things to do whilst taking met or other

    • ANSWER:
      you should be getting more help than this, i was prescribed metformin and orlistat and lost 4 stones. my gynacologist said that because of the pcos i had more insulin in my body than a bodybuilder would use to bulk up!!
      see your doctor and say auntie rachel said, help me more.
      as you probably know all about the condition one of the problems is carb cravings. if someone’s trying to give up smoking they are prescribed nrt thus for our condition we should receive equivalent support.

  7. QUESTION:
    what does this mean about sugar?
    Health Issues: Simple sugars have been documented to contribute to and/or aggravate health problems, including: asthma, mood disorders, mental illness, nervous disorders, diabetes, heart disease, gallstones, hypertension, and arthritis.
    Insulin Impacts: Sugar raises insulin levels, inhibiting the release of growth hormones which depresses the immune system. Further, too much insulin promotes the storage of fat, so that when you eat foods that are high in sugar, you’re enabling rapid weight gain and elevated triglyceride levels, both of which have been linked to cardiovascular disease.
    Degenerative Disease: Sugar has no real nutritional value (minerals, vitamins and fiber) and as a result, has a deteriorating effect on the endocrine system, causing sugar consumption to be one of the 3 major causes of degenerative disease.
    Cancer Culprits: Turns out that cancer’s preferred fuel is none other than glucose. Controlling one’s blood-glucose levels through diet, exercise, supplements, meditation and prescription drugs – when necessary – can be extremely important to a cancer treatment program.

    • ANSWER:
      There is a book called “Sugar Blues” by William Dufty.
      The whole book is about the not so nice things about sugar.
      It even discusses how the demand for sugar was one of the corner stones for slavery in the U.S.

  8. QUESTION:
    whats happening to my blood glucose levels?
    Hi I am 25 years old, female and i’m 13.5 stones. In April this year I was diagnosed with type 2 diabeties. I went through a very bad time, I get very anxious with any sort of medical appointment, and the month I was diagnosed, every day I had some sort of letter through the post telling me about this appointment and that appointment. I decided to fill in a form to say I did not want to attend the appointments and didnt want any mail regarding it. I am just diet controlled so I cut out all sugars, lowered my carbs and for about 3 months I managed to control my blood glucose very well. I lost 6 stones in 5.5 months and joined a gym. I felt like a new person. I tested my blood sugars using a blood sugar monitor about 5 or 6 times a day to ensure I was in control. (very expensive)!

    Suddenly, my blood sugars went from 4.6ish waking and 2hrs after meals (which is where it was since after diagnosis), to the mid 5′s mmol, then the next week the mid 6′s, then the mid 8′s, then 10mmol and so on and so on, and now it’s at the mid 16mmol with a reading of 17.9 on return from work today.

    These rises have happened in a matter of 2 months and where I thought, perhaps i’m coming down with something, i havn’t and they continue to rise. I tested my urine for ketones just now and it is showing a very dark purple (I assume that means I have ketones in my urine). I’ve been feeling okish, a little vague and weak on some days, I just generally feel lazy. Nothing has changed, I’ve been eating the same foods, doing the same excercise etc.

    I’ve got an appointment booked with my doctor tomorrow which i’m scared about, i think he will be happy with my weight loss, but im so concerned now about my blood sugars. any ideas on what my body is playing at and what my doctor may suggest? thanks for reading.

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, I salute you for taking proactive steps to control your diabetes. You have done everything ‘right’ and the proof of that is your good blood sugar control initially.

      Unfortunately though, diabetes is a progressive disease and no matter what one does, sometimes, one can’t fight against it. It’s like somebody diagnosed with myopia, another progressive disease. Myopia often gets worse over the years no matter what the person does or doesn’t do (eat more carrots, only read in well-lit areas etc). It sounds like that’s what is happening with your diabetes.

      There is also another possible explanation and that is that you have been misdiagnosed and actually have Type 1 diabetes. The difference is as follows: In Type 2, the person still makes insulin, but their body does not respond to it well. Low carb/diet/exercise can improve insulin sensitivity and thus blood sugar levels can be controlled.

      In Type 1, the person’s body attacks itself, and they do not produce any insulin anymore. No amount of diet/exercise is going to help. They have to inject insulin to survive.

      While diabetes is progressive, the type of rises in blood sugar that you describe are just too rapid and too severe. It really sounds to me as if you might actually have Type 1. Many people, including many in the medical profession, think that only children get Type 1. But people can get Type 1 at any age. I got it at age 38, and I know a few people who got it in their 50s.

      So when you see the doctor, please ask to be tested for Type 1. Ask to be tested for antibodies. Also ask for a C-peptide test. This measures how much insulin your body is making. Type 1s make very little or no insulin while Type 2s make normal/large amounts of insulin.

      Good luck. I hope this gets sorted out soon.

  9. QUESTION:
    Is any of this true about how good bananas are??
    Never, put your banana in the refrigerator!!!
    This is interesting.
    After reading this, you’ll never look at a banana in the same way again.

    Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy.
    Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes.
    But energy isn’t the only way a banana can help us keep fit.
    It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

    Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.
    PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

    Anemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.
    Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

    Brain Power: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.
    Constipation: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.
    Hangovers: One of the quickest
    ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.
    Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

    Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.
    Mosquito bites: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.
    Nerves: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.

    Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at wor k leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.
    Ulcers: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.
    Temperature control: Many other cultures see bananas as a “cooling” fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.

    Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.
    Smoking &Tobacco Use: Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.
    Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.
    Strokes: According to research in The New England Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!
    Warts: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, “A banana a day keeps the doctor away!”
    PASS IT ON TO YOUR FRIENDS
    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time! I will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe…polish with dry cloth. Amazing fruit !

    • ANSWER:
      i shall start eating a banana a day from tomorrow

  10. QUESTION:
    Cat has a really sensitive back?
    This is a strange question..but for about the last year, my cat has had a very sensitive back. When you pet it..and get to about the middle, he raises his head and looks back. Sometimes he’ll start scratching when you touch his back..similar to what dogs do when you find that “spot.” Well..today I gave him a pet..and he meowed really loudly and looked back as if it hurt.

    I’m not sure if this has anything to do with it, but he has feline diabetes..and we’ve been able to control it through a proper diet (a half a can of cat food in the morning..half at night).. so he’s no longer on insulin and his blood sugar level is fine. However..we’ve noticed that he’s gotten really skinny. He’s a really big cat…very long..but now he only weighs about 11 pounds. Before his diet he was 14. We’ve been asking the vet on his checkups if he’s underweight..but they brush it off and say no. I’ve noticed as of late..his spine kind of.. sticks out..just a bit..as if he’s too skinny and his ribs are showing.

    Could this be the problem maybe? Like I said..his spine sticks out a bit..maybe that’s the cause of his back being so sensitive? Also, do you think he’s underweight? 11 pounds probably sounds fine..but like I said..he’s an incredibly big cat.

    Any feedback is appreciated..thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      It may be simply that he likes to be rubbed there very much and that is why he reacts as he does.

      The thing the that jumped out at me when I read your question was “.. so he’s no longer on insulin and his blood sugar level is fine. However..we’ve noticed that he’s gotten really skinny.”

      How do you know that his “blood sugar level is fine?” Are you using a glucometer (glucose meter) to measure it once or twice a day? And – there is no single blood glucose level. In a health animal, the level goes up and down. When the animal eats, the level goes ups. Between meals, it goes down.

      The fact that your cat is loosing weight makes me very suspicious as to whether his diabetes is actually under control.

      Diabetic cats, and humans, can have what are called Honeymoons. It is a period of time during which it looks like they are no longer diabetic. Virtually all honeymoons – 99.999% – end and the cat or human again needs insulin. It may be that your cat went on a honeymoon which has ended and he once again needs insulin.

      It is a fact, a sad fact but a fact nonetheless, that most vets do not know how to properly treat or monitor diabetic cats and your cat may not know as much as you assume he or she knows.

      Once a cat is diabetic, even if it seems to be controllable with diet, you have to continue to measure the cat’s blood glucose levels. You can’t assume, because they seem to be good for a few days or weeks, that blood glucose levels will remain good.

      Very few diabetic cats can be controlled only with diet. Most, if not all of them, require insulin for the rest of their lives.

      We have been treating diabetic cats for the past 10 years. Simon was diagnosed, on February 26, 2000), about 13 years after he joined the family, and we have adopted three other diabetic cats since then, knowing that they were diabetic when we adopted them.

      When we were talking to the owner of the fourth diabetic cat we adopted, she asked me for a reference. I gave her my vet’s name and telephone number. A few days later she called me back and told me that the vet had said “I can’t think of anyone in the area that can care for a diabetic cat better than Bob”

      I know what I am talking about and you need to figure out why your cat is losing weight.

      I suspect it is because his diabetes is NOT under control.

      Weight loss is one of the classic symptoms of untreated or under treated diabetes.

      You need to measure his blood glucose, more than once, and see where it is during the day. A health cat’s blood glucose level will range from about 50 mg/dL to 120 mg/dL (2.7 mmol/L to 6.6 mmol/L).

      An untreated or undertreated diabetic cat’s blood glucose levels can be well over 300 mg/dL (16.6 mmol/L)

      If you have the vet measure your cat’s blood glucose levels, be aware that stress elevates blood glucose levels (in cats, humans, any mammal) and they vet will see levels higher than the normal range. What is important is how much higher they are – if they are above about 250 mg/dL (13.8 mmol/L) the cat’s diabetes is not under control.

      If your cat’s diabetes is really under control, then there is another disease at work here and you need to find out what it is.

      Weight loss in a cat (diabetic or not) is almost always a symptom of some sort of disease. Diabetes, hyperthyroidism, kidney failure (often called CRF) are but three of the possibilities.

      Now, it is possible that your cat is losing weight because you are not feeding him enough – half a cat of cat food twice a day sound like too little food.

      It is also possible, sort of, that his blood glucose levels are around the normal range because he’s not eating much – but you need to find out the cause of the weight loss – period!

      Here is some information about diabetes:

      Clinical Symptoms of Diabetes:
      - Increased urination
      - Increased thirst
      - Weight loss
      - Increased hunger
      - Lethargy

      Laboratory Symptoms:
      - Excessive glucose in blood
      - Glucose in urine

      The increased urination often results in the cat urinating outside the litter box. Theories are that the cat needs to urinate so often that it simply gives up trying to get to the box or that it becomes uncomfortable or painful to urinate so much and the cat avoids the box because it associates the box with the pain or discomfort.

      Diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas no longer produces sufficient insulin to use glucose in the food or glucose created from protein and amino acids in the food.

      Insulin’s main job is to help cells take in glucose from the bloodstream. Without insulin, only brain and nerve cells can take in glucose.

      Without sufficient insulin, the amount of glucose in the blood increases to quantities that can be as much as 10 times normal. The kidneys filter out glucose and then return it to the blood but with large amounts of glucose in the blood, the kidneys are unable to put all of it back into the blood and some spills over into the bladder with urine.

      This accounts for the increased urination.

      Because of the increased production of urine, more water is excreted and this increases the thirst.

      Because the body is unable to use the glucose, the body goes into starvation mode and this accounts for the loss of weight as fatty tissue is broken down to provide other substances that can be used by cells for “fuel” instead of glucose. This can also increase the hunger.

      A blood glucose test which shows extremely large amounts of glucose in the blood is the first part of the diagnosis. The second part is a urine glucose measurement showing any glucose in the urine.

      Normally, there is no glucose in the urine.

      A vet should have a glucometer which can use a small drop of blood to measure the cat’s blood glucose level.

      If you can take in a urine sample, the vet can use a dip test strip to check for glucose in the urine.

      If you can’t get a urine sample to take in, some vets can get a sample by expressing (squeezing) the bladder or using a syringe and needle to get a sample from the bladder.

      If your cat is diabetic, it will probably require two insulin injections per day.

      If your cat is diabetic, I strongly recommend that you get a glucometer and learn to measure your cat’s blood glucose levels at home.

      We have a web site about our Simon and his diabetes. This link http://www.sugarcatsimon.com will get you there. It is not fully up right now, all that is there is an “under construction” page, it explains why the site is not yet back up.

      If you look at the bottom of the page, you’ll find email addresses for me and Simon (Simon doesn’t keep track of his email so I have it forwarded to me :-)

      Feel free to use the email link there to email me or Simon. Please email me so we can make sure you vet is properly monitoring your cat’s diabetes.

      I will send you my cell phone number, my wife’s cell phone number, and my wife’s business telephone number (she owns and runs the business).

      Be aware that many, if not the majority of vets simply don’t know the correct way to treat diabetic cats.

      That might sound strange but it is sadly true.

      I learned it during the first months after Simon was diagnosed on Saturday, February 26, 2000 at about 11:20 AM – I remember that day very well :-(

      Over the years we have adopted three other diabetic cats, Stranger, Felix, and Kalib.

      Only Felix is still with us.

      There’s nothing about Stranger, Felix, or Kalib on the web site – it is only about Simon, I never got around to adding anything about them.

      I am working on an entire replacement for the site but it will be months before it is ready.

      As I said before, feel free to email me if your cat is diabetic and I’ll help you get started.

      Good Luck

  11. QUESTION:
    Which of the following is NOT a function of bones?
    Which of the following is NOT a function of bones?
    To protect organs
    To allow us to stand
    To provide places of attachment for muscles
    To help transport blood

    2: Which of the following is a difference between bone and cartilage?
    Bones are more flexible than cartilage.
    Bones are harder than cartilage.
    Bones are larger than cartilage.
    Bones heal more completely than cartilage.

    3: All muscles pull rather than push. How, then, is it possible for you to push a table or a chair across a room?
    Because muscles are strong
    Because muscles are arranged in opposed groups
    Because muscles contract in different directions
    Because muscle fiber has many different layers

    4: How does heart muscle tissue resemble voluntary muscle tissue?
    Because the heart has cross-striations
    Because the muscle tissues have one nucleus
    Because we can control our heart beat
    Because the heart is made of smooth muscle tissue

    5: What is a function of plasma?
    To allow blood cells to flow throughout the body
    To bring food to cells of body tissue
    To help fight disease
    To carry hemoglobin to muscle groups

    6: What is one way the blood is adapted to resist the invasion of micro-organisms?
    By carrying hemoglobin to all parts of the body
    By creating lymph out of plasma
    Through white corpuscles
    The blood does not resist invasion, other organs filter blood to remove micro-organisms

    7: Describe the pattern of blood flow through the heart, body, and lungs.
    Blood passes through the left ventricle of the heart to the arteries, through the muscles, into the veins, into the right ventricle of the heart, into the lungs, back into the left ventricle, and begins again
    Blood passes through the lungs to collect oxygen, into the right ventricle, into the veins, into the left ventricle, and into the arteries which lead to the lungs for replenishing the oxygen supply
    Blood passes from the left ventricle to the veins, through the muscles, to the arteries, to the lungs, into the right ventricle of the heart to begin again
    Blood passes from the right ventricle of the heart to the lungs, through the arteries, through the muscles, and back to the lungs through the veins

    8: Distinguish between an artery and a vein.
    An artery is carries much more blood than veins, which branch off of arteries
    Arteries carry oxygen-rich blood to muscle tissue; veins return blood with waste be replenished with oxygen
    Veins carry oxygen-rich blood to muscle tissue; arteries return blood with waste be replenished with oxygen
    A vein carries much more blood than arteries, which branch off of veins

    9: What is meant by “blood type”?
    The kind of cells that make up blood, varying with the ratio of red to white blood cells
    Hemophiliacs have a different blood type than healthy people, which is why their blood does not clot normally
    A classification of blood based on inherited differences on the surface of red blood cells
    A classification of blood based on inherited differences in the chemical compounds that bond to create blood

    10: How is the action of a hormone similar to that of a nerve?
    Because they both bring about responses
    Because they are both delivered through the blood system
    Because they are both issued from parts of the brain
    Because they are both essential in puberty

    11: What is diabetes and how is it treated?
    The pancreas does not supply enough insulin and excessive amounts of sugar collect in the blood. It is treated by controlling diet and injecting extra insulin into the blood.
    The thyroid gland is overactive and can cause weight-loss, irritability, and protrusion of the eyes. It is controlled through various medical procedures to reduce levels of thyroxin.
    The pancreas produces too much insulin and breaks down the sugar in the blood too fast. It is treated by controlled diet and injecting insulin-suppressors into the blood.
    The thyroid gland is under-active and people tend to become obese and slow in reactions. It is controlled by diet and injections of thyroxin.

    • ANSWER:
      1. transport blood
      2. bones are harder
      3. arranged in opposing groups
      4. smooth muscle tissue?
      5. blood cell flow
      6. white corpuscles
      7. Blood passes through the left ventricle of the heart to the arteries….
      8. Arteries to muscle tissue; veins return blood to heart
      9. A classification of blood based on inherited differences on the surface of red blood cells
      10. Because they both bring about responses
      11. The pancreas does not supply enough insulin and excessive amounts of sugar collect in the blood. It is treated by controlling diet and injecting extra insulin into the blood.

  12. QUESTION:
    hormone/ birth control questions?
    HI! question. yes. I have seen my doctor and several others. No good information was given. Its all hit and miss.

    I have been on the depro shot for three years. doc gave me 250mg per two and 1/2 months. Over the years I realized it was affecting my central nervous system. I asked him to lower the dosage. He did a couple of times. I got feed up with the PANIC attacks and weakness and blood sugar levels. I just told him to hit the road, I did not want to take another shot. I feel much better now. I feel so much better that I dont fear things as much and have to fight everyday with Panick attacks. I have not had a period now for over three years. I stop the depro and got on the Nuva ring. I leave in for three weeks and take it out and put another one in right away. I do this so My hormone levels wont drop.
    My question is to you…….
    I have been on the ring now for about four months straight, should I take a week break at this point?I am not sure if the depro is out of my system completly or not so I would not know if It would even make a difference. My second question to you at this point, is has anyone gone through what I am going through now? Would this depro be out of my system just yet after five months. I have been getting yeast infections and I am not sure if its due to my diet or the Nuva ring. I noticed I have been having yeast infections more often with the ring.I am not sure what to do @ this point.I have noticed that I am also getting melasma on my face as well now. Should I let my body take a week break or continue this course with the nuva ring. I do have depression and suffer from PMS w/o birth control or hormone assistance.I am on anit-anxiety meds to help but, i really still need the hormones.I am 35, had one child. white female slender in build if this information helps, all doctors comment on fragile bones and age so any input please?

    • ANSWER:

  13. QUESTION:
    biology questions help :) ?
    How do human bodies respond to changes inside them and to their environment?
    1. What does the nervous system enable humans to do?
    2. What does a receptor detect?
    3. Where are the receptors, which are sensitive to changes in the position of our body and to help us keep our balance?
    4. What are receptors on the tongue sensitive to?
    5. What three stimuli are receptors in the skin sensitive to?
    6. How does information from receptors pass to the brain?
    7. What does the brain decide from the information it receives?
    8. What are automatic, rapid responses to stimuli called?
    9. What are the names of the three types of neurone involved in this response?
    10. What structures in the body respond to the impulses sent by a motor neurone? (notes)
    11. What is the name of the chemical substances that coordinate many processes in the body?
    12. What produces these chemicals?
    13. How do they get to the organs that they will affect (the target organ)?
    14. What two ways does the body lose water?
    15. Through which organ does the body lose excess water? What substance is it lost in?
    16. What temperature does the body need to be maintained at? Why?
    17. Why do blood sugar levels need to be controlled?
    18. Which two hormones are involved in promoting the release of an egg in the menstrual cycle?
    19. Which gland is FSH secreted by, and where can the gland be found?
    20. What two actions does FSH cause?
    21. Which structures secrete oestrogen?
    22. What two actions does oestrogen have on the body?
    23. What action do the hormones in oral contraceptives have?
    24. What action has FSH when given as a ‘fertility drug’?
    What can we do to keep our bodies healthy?
    1. What two things does a healthy diet contain?
    2. What word describes diseases that you might get with an unhealthy diet?
    3. What word describes people who eat an unbalanced diet?
    4. What two conditions mean that you need less food?
    5. What is your metabolic rate?
    6. What three things make this vary?
    7. What two factors in the developed world are leading to high levels of obesity?
    8. What are the diseases linked to excess weight?
    9. What does processed food often contain high proportions of?
    10. Where is cholesterol made?
    11. Where is cholesterol found?
    12. What do high levels of cholesterol in the blood cause?
    13. What does the amount of cholesterol made by the liver depend on?
    14. What is cholesterol carried around the body by?
    15. Which lipoproteins carry ‘bad’ cholesterol?
    16. What do these cause?
    17. Which lipoproteins are ‘good’ cholesterol?
    18. What can too much salt in the diet cause for about 30% of the population?
    19. What type of fats increase cholesterol levels?
    20. What two actions do mono-unsaturated and polyunsaturated fats have?
    How do we use/abuse medical and recreational drugs?
    1. What are many drugs made (derived) from?
    2. When scientists develop new drugs, what has to happen to them?
    3. What are drugs tested in the laboratory for?
    4. What are they trialled on humans for?
    5. Why is the impact of legal drugs on health much greater than the impact of illegal drugs?
    6. What was the drug thalidomide developed for?
    7. What effect did it cause in pregnant women?
    8. What were the unknown side effects of the drug on pregnant women?
    9. What is thalidomide used to treat now?
    10. What action do drugs have on people’s bodies?
    11. If people become dependent or addicted to the drug what do they suffer if they stop taking the drug?
    12. What two drugs are very addictive?
    13. What is the addictive substance in tobacco smoke?
    14. What is a carcinogen? (notes)
    15. What gas does tobacco smoke contain that affects a foetus?
    16. How does this gas affect the blood of the mother?
    17. What two effects does this have on the foetus?
    18. How does alcohol affect the nervous system?
    19. How does too much alcohol affect the body?
    20. What organs are damaged by drinking too much alcohol?
    What causes infectious diseases and how can our bodies defend themselves against them?
    1. What are micro-organisms that cause infectious diseases called?
    2. What happens to bacteria and viruses when they get inside the body?
    3. When do viruses damage our cells?
    4. Which blood cells help to defend us against pathogens?
    5. What three things do they do to help us?
    6. What is an antibiotic?
    7. How do antibiotics work?
    8. Why can antibiotics not be used to kill viral pathogens?
    9. Why is it difficult to develop drugs which kill viruses?
    10. How can people be immunised against disease?
    11. What cells do vaccines stimulate?
    12. What chemicals do these cells produce?
    13. What do these chemicals do?
    14. Why is the body then immune to future infections by that micro-organism?
    15. What does the MMR vaccine protect children against?
    thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      ok… You cannot be serious!

      I will only do a few…

      1. Respond to stimuli in the environment
      2. Stimuli (?)
      3. in the ears (or just behind)
      4. taste (chemicals)

      6. Sensory neurone
      7. how to respond
      8. reflexes
      9. Sensory -> Relay -> Motor
      10. effectors (muscles, glands etc)
      11. hormones

      13. bloodstream
      14. sweating, breathing (water vapour)
      15. bladder – urine

      18. FSH and LH
      19. Pituitary gland
      20. matures the egg and stimulates the release of oestrogen
      21. ovaries?
      22. builds the lining of the womb and stimulates the release of LH

      24. matures the egg

      That’s the first lot – do you want the rest??

  14. QUESTION:
    this is interesting,i know they are long people’s but their good! this also is a mother in law thing! lol?
    Subject: FW: [Fwd: Fw: THE BANANA]

    There may be some truth in this one

    The Banana

    Never, put your banana in the refrigerator!!!

    This is interesting.

    After reading this, you’ll never look at a banana in the same
    way again.

    Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and
    glucose combined with fibre. A banana gives an instant,
    sustained and substantial boost of energy. Research has proven
    that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous
    90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one
    fruit with the world’s leading athletes. But energy isn’t the
    only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help
    overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and
    conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

    Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND
    amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much
    better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain
    tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into
    serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and
    generally make you feel happier.

    PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it
    contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your
    mood.

    Anaemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of
    haemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anaemia.

    Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high
    in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood
    pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has
    just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for
    the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and
    stroke.

    Brain Power: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school
    were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at
    breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain
    power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can
    assist learning by making pupils more alert.

    Constipation: High in fibre, including bananas in the diet can
    help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the
    problem without resorting to laxatives.

    Hangovers: One of the quickest
    ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake,
    sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with
    the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels,
    while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

    Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body,
    so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for
    soothing relief.

    Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to
    keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness

    Mosquito bites: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try
    rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin.
    Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling
    and irritation.

    Nerves: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the
    nervous system.

    Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology
    in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort
    food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital
    patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to
    be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid
    panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood
    sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two
    hours to keep levels steady.

    Ulcers: The banana is used as the dietary food against
    intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and
    smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without
    distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes
    over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of
    the stomach.

    Temperature control: Many other cultures see bananas as a
    “cooling” fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional
    temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example,
    pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a
    cool temperature.

    Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Bananas can help SAD
    sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer
    tryptophan.

    Smoking &Tobacco Use: Bananas can also help people trying to
    give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the
    potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover
    from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.

    Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize
    the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your
    body’s water balance When we are stressed, our metabolic rate
    rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be
    rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.

    Strokes: According to research in The New England Journal of
    Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the
    risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!

    Warts: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you
    want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place
    it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the
    skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When
    you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein,
    twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times
    the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and
    minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best
    value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known
    phrase so that we say, “A banana a day keeps the doctor away!”

    PASS IT ON TO YOUR FRIENDS
    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the
    time! I will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes??
    Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the
    shoe…polish with dry cloth.

    Amazing fruit!

    • ANSWER:
      This is the best information I have received in awhile.
      Thank you for sharing..

  15. QUESTION:
    Do you know how wonderous Banana is?
    This is interesting.
    After reading this, you’ll never look at a banana in the same way again.

    Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy

    Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes.

    But energy isn’t the only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

    DEPRESSION: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

    PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

    ANEMIA: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.

    BLOOD PRESSURE: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

    BRAIN POWER: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school ( England ) were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power.. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.

    CONSTIPATION: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.

    HANGOVERS: One of the quickest ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

    HEARTBURN: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

    MORNING SICKNESS: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.

    MOSQUITO BITE: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.

    NERVES: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.

    Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and chips. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.

    ULCERS: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.

    TEMPERATURE CONTROL: Many other cultures see bananas as a ‘cooling’ fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.

    SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER (SAD): Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.

    SMOKING AND TOBACCO USE: Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.

    STRESS: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.

    STROKES: According to research in The New England Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!

    WARTS: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four
    POLL: Do you think it is interesting?
    The ending paragraph:

    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, ‘A banana a day keeps the doctor away!’

    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time! I will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe…polish with dry cloth. Amazing fruit !!!

    • ANSWER:
      Superb info. Thanks a lot. Now I have started eating Bananas and really they are helpful!! Thank You.

  16. QUESTION:
    What do you think is the most nutritious fruit and vegetable in the whole world?
    I love fruits and vegetables much because these are good for my diet especially banana. I will share you something about banana. I received this e-mail from my friend in Japan.

    Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

    PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

    Anemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.

    Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

    Brain Power: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.

    Constipation: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.

    Hangovers: One of the quickest
    ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

    Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

    Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.

    Mosquito bites: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.

    Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.

    Ulcers: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.

    Temperature control: Many other cultures see bananas as a ‘cooling’ fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.

    Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.

    Smoking & Tobacco Use: Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassiu! m and ma gnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.

    Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.

    Strokes: According to research in ‘The New England Journal of Medicine, ‘eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!

    Warts: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

    • ANSWER:
      Perhaps it would be Spirulina which is one of the green super foods that also include Chlorella, Barley Grass, Wheatgrass and Alfalfa.

      Spirulina is rich in complete protein, beta carotenes (vitamin A precursor), vitamin B12, chlorophyll and iron as well as antioxidants, enzymes, amino acids, minerals and vitamins.

  17. QUESTION:
    Do you know about these banana facts?
    BANANAS�

    A professor at CCNY for a physiological psych class told his class about�
    Bananas. �He said the expression ‘going bananas’ is from the effects of�
    Bananas on the brain. �Read on:�

    Never, put your banana in the refrigerator!!!�
    This is interesting.�
    After reading this, you’ll never look at a banana in the same way�
    Again.�

    Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose�
    Combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial�
    Boost of energy.�

    Research has proven that just two bananas provide�
    Enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the�
    Number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes.�

    But energy isn’t�
    The only way a banana can help us keep fit.�It can�
    Also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and�
    Conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.�

    Depression:�
    According to a recent�
    Survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt�
    Much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan,�
    A type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you�
    Relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.�

    PMS:�Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it�
    Contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.�

    Anemia:�High�
    In iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and�
    So helps in cases of anemia.�

    Blood�
    Pressure:�This unique�
    Tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it�
    Perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug�
    Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims�
    For the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.�

    Brain�
    Power:�200 students at a�
    Twickenham (Middlesex) school were helped through their exams this year by�
    Eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain�
    Power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning�
    By making pupils more alert.�

    Constipation:�
    High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel�
    Action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.�

    Hangovers:�
    One of the quickest�
    Ways of curing a hangover is to�
    Make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach�
    And, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while�
    The milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.�

    Heartburn:�Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if�
    You suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.�

    Morning�
    Sickness:�Snacking on�
    Bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning�
    Sickness.�

    Mosquito bites:�Before reaching for the insect bite cream,�
    Try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people�
    Find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.�

    Nerves:�
    Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.�

    Overweight�
    And at work? Studies at the�
    Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on�
    Comfort food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients,�
    Researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs.�
    The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to�
    Control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every�
    Two hours to keep levels steady.�

    Ulcers:�The�
    Banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its�
    Soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten�
    Without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity�
    And reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.�

    Temperature control:�Many other cultures see bananas as a�
    ‘cooling’ fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of�
    Expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to�
    Ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.�

    Seasonal�
    Affective Disorder (SAD):�Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood�
    Enhancer tryptophan.�

    Smoking &Tobacco�
    Use:�Bananas can also help�
    People trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the�
    Potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects�
    of nicotine withdrawal. < BR>

    Stress:�Potassium�
    is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the�
    brain and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our�
    metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be�
    rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.�

    Strokes:�According to research in The New England Journal of�
    Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death�
    by strokes by as much as 40%!�

    Warts:�Those�
    keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a�
    piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out.�
    Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!�

    So, a banana�
    really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it�
    has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the�
    phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins�
    and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods�
    around. �So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, ‘A�
    banana a day keeps the doctor away!’�

    PASS IT ON TO YOUR FRIENDS�
    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time! I�
    will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the�
    banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe…polish with dry cloth. Amazing�
    fruit�!�

    • ANSWER:
      Omggg Ahhhh that is seriously so cool!
      im going to show my whole family haha.
      :) Thaaaankss.

  18. QUESTION:
    For Girls: Is it true……………?
    that the natural smell of a male body is far more sexually potent than the deodorant he uses to mask it?

    DID YOU know that the odour of your man’s body is probably what makes you want to touch him? You may scoff at the idea, especially since there is such a plethora of products to disguise this- deodorants, body washes and creams. But the reality is that the natural, unscented smell of a male body and sweat is far more sexually potent than the Axe spray he applies to mask it!

    According to a study by the UK-based Social Issues Research Centre, females often get attracted to the scent of male sweat. Our bodies release certain chemical substances, called pheromones that are sensed through the nose and trigger sexual urges in prospective partners. These are secreted by sweat glands largely present in underarms, nipples, genitals, and outer ears.”

    Body odour often influences a partner’s sexual behaviour and women are more receptive to it,” says Dr ( Col) V K Wadia, consultant, psychosexual medicine. ” During a sexual intercourse, specific odours are secreted by men and it’s a woman’s perception how she gets influenced by them,” he adds.

    Not only is body odour significant in sexual behaviour, it plays a decisive role in mate choice as well. “Men and women tend to prefer the odour of individuals who are genetically dissimilar to them,” says Dr Anoop Misra, director, department of diabetes and metabolic diseases, Fortis Hospital.

    This reduces the chances of inbreeding and renders offspring more resistant to diseases and infections. However, odour preferences can vary according to hormonal changes. “Studies say that women often prefer the odour of men with good parenting skills in the ‘fertile period’ or the postmenstrual phase,” says Dr Misra.

    ON THE other hand, men find women more attractive during ovulation. This is mainly due to the specific odour of women in that period. It has also been found that women who are emotionally bonded with their partners perceive the odour of other men less pleasant.

    So, what makes our odour so specific? Usually when we perspire, sweat reacts with bacteria present on our skin. This releases some chemicals, hence causing body odour. But it’s not just an outcome of sweat. “All of us have a signature odour. This uniqueness is marked by genetics, diet, age, gender, hormones, and environmental factors,” says Dr Sushila Kataria, senior consultant, internal medicine, Medanta – The Medicity.

    This explains why babies smell different from adults, and how odour changes with the onset of puberty. This also explains why some of us have specific unpleasant odours. Bad breath or strong sweat can be a sign of underlying physical problems. “Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis can have a fruity odour in their breath and skin,” says Dr Misra.

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is a condition of excessively high blood sugar level that leads to formation of chemical substances called ketone bodies. Their presence causes the typical smell. The best way to prevent is to keep one’s blood sugar levels in control.

    “In case of chronic kidney problem, or dysfunctional kidneys, the patient’s body odour may resemble that of ammonia. This is because such patients retain more wastes or urea in the blood, that spreads to skin and evaporates with sweat,” says Prof ( Dr) S C Tiwari, director, nephrology, Fortis Group of Hospitals.

    Moreover, a musty odour in hair, breath or skin could be a sign of a genetic disorder called phenylketonuria (PKU). Left untreated in early childhood, it could lead to mental retardation or brain damage later. “Similarly, bad breath could be a symptom of non-healing ulcers in the throat, lungs or respiratory tract,” points out Manoj K Goel, director, pulmonology, Delhi Heart and Lung Institute. Bad breath could also be sign of bacterial pneumonia and chronic bronchitis.

    “Cough accompanied by foul smell may be a symptom of lung abscess. Such infections pose immense risks as these could result in cancer if left unattended,” he cautions.

    • ANSWER:
      I get aroused by the smell of a really good cologne!

  19. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to improve eyesight by getting diabetes under control?
    The reason I ask is because a student of mine, who happens to be a senior citizen, told me that when she lost weight on a low-carb diet in order to get her blood sugars to a normal level, she noticed a significant improvement in her eyesight. Her diabetes is managed only through diet.

    What do you think?

    • ANSWER:
      absolutely possible!! higher glucose levels adversly effect eyesight! Getting them down to normal or near normal helps all sorts of body functions.

      Good on your student for taking control of her future!! It is very important.

      Unfortunately, type 2 diabetes is progressive and will progress as IT wishes no matter what we do to try to control it. Some can go for years on just food plan and exercise alone without meds and then there are those of us who no matter how many hours we spend doing exercises and very very low carb food plan add more and more medications to our regime!! It is very individual!!

  20. QUESTION:
    Questions on Gestational Diabetes?
    I am 32 weeks and found out I had GD at 29 weeks. I’ve been controlling it through diet and exercise so far. I am scheduled for an Ultrasound on Friday to check the baby’s size, although I see I shouldn’t get to concerned with what that says since it looks like the accuracy isn’t very good this far along.

    I check my levels 4 times a day.

    My fasting (which is supposed to be between 70-90) is pretty consistently 100-117 (average so far is 105 even though I’ve had a few in the low 90’s, but never below 90).

    My after breakfast (which is supposed to be between 70-120) is almost always between 100-120 (average so far is 107).

    My after lunch (should be between 70-120) is usually OK and has been better lately. It’s average so far is 122.

    My after dinner (should be between 70-120) is usually OK too and has also been better lately. I’m averaging 119 for it.

    I’ve never had a fasting above 117 or a 2 hour after meals over 147.

    How does this compare to your levels? I’m sticking to the diet exactly and am exercising as much as possible.

    Also, my doctor has talked about maybe starting me on oral meds (before going to insulin) if my fasting numbers don’t get more control. If you were put on medication, at what point and did it help?

    I’m also interested in when you delivered and how much your baby weighed? Were you induced or when went into labor on your own? How many weeks were you then? Did you have the baby vaginally or by c-section? How much did your baby weigh and did that vary from the ultrasound estimate if one was done? Did the baby have low blood sugar or have to go into NICU after birth?

    Thanks for sharing your experience. You see so many questions here from pregnant mothers w/ GD, but not so many that check in after the birth to tell how everything went.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I myself do not have gestational diabetes ( I’m 36 weeks with baby no2) but my partners aunt is controlling her gestational diabetes with insulin ( she’s just found out she has diabetes and the doctors need to control things quicker now rather than later)

      She is having fortnightly growth scans to see how the baby is getting on. Although I don’t agree with this as it can scare mothers into thinking they’re having a large baby. Growth scans can have a margin of error by as much as 1lb! and in baby weight, it makes all the difference. Your obstetrician will know by the time you reach 36 weeks if you’ll need a c-section or induce you, as they don’t like to run the risk of the baby being too big.
      My mother had G/B with my sister and me and my sister was delivered 10 days early at 9lbs 3oz I was delivered by c-section 3 years later 1 week early at 10lbs 8oz… please bear in mind though, it was my mothers 3rd and 4th pregnancy.

      But, if you’re controlling your diabetes by diet, then you could end up having a normal sized baby for a woman with G/B. I’ve heard of women who control their G/B with diet alone and have had a 8lb baby. I think you are getting yourself worked up too much. Your doctor/midwife and obstetrician will not let you get so big that you can’t have your baby naturally ( unless you don’t want to)

      Also, usually a big baby will still not be delivered ( even by c-section) until at least 37 weeks unless your health is at risk.

  21. QUESTION:
    2 Hours Glucose Test Results, Borderline Gestational Diabetes?
    Hey Guys,

    I just came back from my OB appointment and they informed me of my 2 hours glucose tolerance test which I had to do since I failed my 1 hour glucose tolerance test.

    2 of them (the fasting one, and the one after 2 hours) are normal, but the one after 1 hour was 10.8 and it should be 10.6! =S they said its borderline GD and has referred me to the nutritionist!

    I do not understand…. is it really that bad =|

    I read on internet that in America where they have 3 hours test (4 blood samples) if 2 of them come back normal (50%) they say you passed!! My 2 out of 3 were normal =O

    I’m feeling very upset…. though the doctor said, it can be controlled through diet since the result is not very high, and no medicine would be needed, I still would need to monitor my sugar levels numerous times a day =( really scared since I’m a HUGE needle phobic! Not looking forward to that part…

    Any similar experiences, advise? what do you guys think?

    I’m currently in my 30th week and have gained 11 pounds so far, and I exercise around 50 minutes on treadmill, 5 times a week!

    • ANSWER:
      First, borderline is NOT as bad as it sounds, so calm down! I know it is very scary to be told something like that. Remember, too, that just because you happened to have one bad test does not mean that you are like that all the time. Everybody can have a fluke once in a while. I had one bad test and told them I was not going to go through the 3-hour test but they could prick my finger and take my blood as much as they wished. And it was never high again, never even close to borderline again, actually.

      From your exercise and weight gain, it sounds like you are doing great. Most likely, you’ll just need to cut out sweets and that will be plenty.

  22. QUESTION:
    36 wks with Gestational Diabetes…insulin fears?
    Hi, I am almost 36 wks pregnant with gestational diabetes. Once I was diagnosed, I was able to quickly work my diet to get my blood sugars at the proper level, so I would not need insulin. A few weeks ago, I started getting highs after my breakfast test (with even one serving of carbs). So I started eliminating carbs from breakfast. I usually have a protein shake with soymilk for breakfast and a few pieces of turkey sausage, and then after my morning bg test I will have a piece of peanut butter toast or fruit. My question is, now my lunch numbers are becoming more sensitive and if I have my max carbs (which my dietician said was ok since I was carb-free for breakfast), my bg levels are over, usually in the 140′s. My dietician now wants me to go on insulin. My doc has seen my bg readings for the last 2 weeks and didn’t seem so concerned. I would love to get through these last few weeks (I only have three because I am having a scheduled cesarean at 39wks) without having to prod myself further and give a shot every morning. What should I do? As of now, I am waiting to see my doc next week before making a final decision. I don’t really want to give myself a shot every day, but of course, baby comes first and I want to do what is best. I have not gained very much weight this pregnancy, but my baby is gaining and measuring average. Any expert advice? Go for the insulin or try to control more carbs? I don’t want to be on the Atkins diet while prego, that can’t be good for baby. Thanks:)

    • ANSWER:
      Just go on the insulin. It makes control much easier and will take some of the stress off of you. It is for your good health as well as the babies. I went on insulin and wish I had done it a lot sooner, because now I have good BS levels almost all of the time. You should also know that 65% of women that have had gestational diabetes end up developing type 2 later in life. So keep an eye on things even after you have the baby.

  23. QUESTION:
    Science again?
    1.How is the action of a hormone similar to that of a nerve?
    Because they both bring about responses
    Because they are both delivered through the blood system
    Because they are both issued from parts of the brain
    Because they are both essential in puberty

    2: What is diabetes and how is it treated?
    The pancreas does not supply enough insulin and excessive amounts of sugar collect in the blood. It is treated by controlling diet and injecting extra insulin into the blood.

    The thyroid gland is overactive and can cause weight-loss, irritability, and protrusion of the eyes. It is controlled through various medical procedures to reduce levels of thyroxin.

    The pancreas produces too much insulin and breaks down the sugar in the blood too fast. It is treated by controlled diet and injecting insulin-suppressors into the blood.

    The thyroid gland is under-active and people tend to become obese and slow in reactions. It is controlled by diet and injections of thyroxin.

    • ANSWER:
      1 = because they both bring about responses
      2 = the pancreas does not supply enough insulin and excessive amounts of sugar collect in the blood. It is treated by controlling diet and injecting extra insulin into the blood.

  24. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had the Gestational Diabetes test in the first trimester?
    I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes during my first pregnancy. It was easily controlled with diet (I actually never had high blood sugars in all the time I was testing). Due to that diagnosis, it is requested that I take the test during the first trimester of my current second pregnancy. I am wondering if my glucose readings are abnormal this time around in the one hour test if I will be required to take the 3 hour challenge test, or if “failing” one will be sufficient for a diagnosis. I don’t mind regularly checking my blood glucose levels, but I’d like to not sit through the three hour test since it does make me queasy and ill. Since they know I have a history of this, might they let me off at the first test if it comes back abnormal?

    • ANSWER:
      They usually try to have you just do the 3-hour in the first trimester if you’re at a high risk of gestational diabetes. If they ask you to do a 1-hour, and you fail, then they will make you do a 3-hour, generally. But, it’s probably just easier to do a 3-hour if you are at higher risk. If I were you, I’d ask to just do a 3-hour without bothering with the 1-hour. That’s what I did!

  25. QUESTION:
    I had my one hour glucose test, and the nurse called….?
    She said that she wants me to come in and have a three hour test done and my blood sugar is only at 149. With my last pregnancy my blood sugar was at 163 after my one hour test and my doctor didn’t do anything about it. I was never on insulin and we just controlled it through diet. So, I told the nurse that I am not coming in for the test, that I feel it is unnecessary and that I will definitely watch my diet and cut out all sugar and complex carbohydrates. I know that they are not going to put me on insulin at that level and I have to pay out of pocket towards my deductible if I go. My brother is a doctor also and doesn’t seem worried about it at all. So, my question is… Do you think that 149 is high? What was your blood sugar after the one hour test? And did you have to go for a three hour test?
    I guess it’s the ‘cut-off’ levels I really don’t understand. Like Mishele says, her doctors cut-off is 130, my doctors is 140. But my last OB with my first pregnancy, her cut-off was 160. Where do they get these numbers?

    • ANSWER:
      I also had this problem. My doctor wanted one done early (at 11 weeks) and their cut off was 130 and I was 137. They then ordered a 3 hour test and like you I ALSO feel this was unnecessary. So when I went to the perinatologist last week they asked if I had scheduled it and I told them no. The one hour test seemed like eons and I’ve never had to have a 3 hour test before, so I’m resistant to do it. They said my insulin level was high (i think the norm is up to 15 and I was 17) and they said it’s a sign of early insulin resistance. Puhleeze….. I do not think I’m going to do the 3 hour one unless the repeat one hour one at 18 weeks comes back funky.

  26. QUESTION:
    Is it mandatory to tell a soldier they are flagged? (part 2)?
    My original post was from 2 weeks ago, so it has expired and I can no longer add to it so….here it is along with more info:
    Is it mandatory to tell a soldier they are flagged?
    I am a SGT/E-5 int the army, I just printed out my ERB, and I’m flagged for Weight Control. I have always had a struggle with my weight, however, this is the first time I have ever been flagged. I tried researching if the Soldier needs to be told they are flagged or not. I was surprised about the flag, because I had never been notified.
    2 weeks ago (Tiebreaker)
    Additional Details
    Hmm…you just knew? But isn’t there a counseling involved to enter into the weight contro program, then you go see a doc to see if its a medical condition preventing the Soldier from meeting the standards, then Soldier sees a nutritionist and after that is completed, then the Soldier is to be flagged.
    Thats how I have understood it form other Soldiers that were on the program before.
    2 weeks ago

    I AM NOT ATE UP! Im a single mother of 2 little ones….
    I did not meet the standards due medication I have been on for Fibromyalgia (FMS)…with that being said I can not take supplements and cant work out hard enough in order to lose weight, Im already on a 1200 calorie diet..little to no carbs
    2 weeks ago

    Some ppl answered it with smart ass remarks and that is why i added to the question, i have more to add so this is why i created another; Well, the correct answer to this question, is YES!
    A soldier must be told, regardless if they are aware that by regulation they are to be flagged for whatever reason, in this case its for failure of a tape test. In the Regulation, AR 600-9 it clearly states that the soldier must be notified in writing by the commander initiating the FLAG, but FIRST they are to inform you (by written statement), give you a written counseling ensuring you know what is going to be expected of you due to failure of tape test, and they must refer you to your units medical personnel your local TMC, and the doc will issue blood tests and refer you to a dietician/nutritionist and they will guide you on how to improve your diet. After the blood results that doc will determine if your sugar levels are high, hightened thyroid, or etc…which maybe the cause for you to be unable to meet the standard set forth to all personnel…it may be meds you may be on that can cause you an inability to lose weight, or an illness….once the doc clears you that it is not a medical reason, he then calls the commander and informs them it is ok for the soldier to be entered to the overweight program, then the commander has a green light to FLAG the soldier. the soldier is entered into program and 30days from then the soldier is to be weghed and taped to ensure progress is being made through the MFT’s remedial or special pops exercise plan.
    IF the doc determines it is a medical reason, then he will decide how long you will be exempt from meeting the standard usually its 30-60days or a profile will be written if it is determined that it is impossible for you to maintain the standard and that may dictate a chapter in the future.
    Now, that info is put out, in my case, I read the reg, and went to my commander to ask why i had been flagged if proper procedure was not follwed….well, i didnt get a reasonable explanation, so, I called IG requesting guidance on the situation,..
    I ended up filing an IG complaint, b/c i wasnt arguing the overweight part but arguing the fact procedure wasnt used properly and didnt even take into consideration that I am ill and am on a blend of medication that may cause a problem with my weight..I am not looking for an excuse to not be flagged but if the chance was given to others to determine if a medical reason may be the cause then, why not give it to me,..knowing that I do have an illness that may be the cause?
    The command ultimately decided to single me out in front of the whole company and moved me out somewhere else in the brigade as reprisal for having used IG for what it is solely there for, in-turn, reprisal is a no-no for having exercised my rights as a soldier to rectify an issue….
    why they would do that to themselves, is totally beyond the level i imagined it would go…but anyhow, the point of this post is….
    When you know you are right about something, give your command a chance but if they fail to do the right thing after they have been informed then exercise your rights….stick up for the right thing and the right reasons…
    I have never been in trouble, i am an average soldier, no i dont meed the standard right now, but I am trying to do what i can with my body to best of my abilities due to my illness…I am an E-5, so, if the command is willing to do wrong to an E-5,…what are they willing or what have they already done to E-4 and below…
    The regs are there to be read and followed……

    • ANSWER:
      YES! Go back to civilian life!

  27. QUESTION:
    Type 1 diabetes: Tired of being tired?
    I’m a 31-year-old male and was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when I was 15 years old. Aside from trace amounts of protein in my urine several years ago, which subsequently went away through pre-emptive treatment of ACE inhibitors, I have had no complications associated with the disease. However, I am a ‘brittle’ diabetic, meaning that despite being in reasonably good control and testing myself several times a day, my blood sugar swings from lows to highs on a regular basis. For the past year or so, I’ve noticed a significant decrease in my energy levels. I could easily lay in bed all weekend and sleep. I’ve tried just about everything; I thought perhaps it may be ‘adrenal fatigue’ (I’ve been a caffeine junkie for years) and so weaned myself entirely off diet cokes and red bulls. I’ve switched to an Atkins diet. I walk at least two miles a day. I’ve tried amino acid supplements. But despite this my default state is one of exhaustion. I despise it, I want to be more productive! Help?

    • ANSWER:
      While there could be many causes for your fatigued feeling, some that are common to the type 1 diabetic are the swings from low to high in blood sugars, and kidney disease. If you have a history of renal disease, such as you pointed out with the protein in the urine and its treatment with ACE inhibitors, both the Atkins diet and the amino acid supplements are not a good idea and could, in fact exacerbate kidney disease. Has your doctor performed a 24-hour urine collection for protein and creatinine lately? Have you noticed any edema (swelling) in your ankles or legs? Even small amounts of swelling can be an indication. As I said, though, there cuold be a number of reasons for your fatigue, including if you are not drinking enough water. Dehydration can also be a contributor to fatigue, as could more serious problems, such as heart disease (e.g. congestive heart disease). You need to talk to your doctor, who can perform testing to help determine the cause. Good luck to you!

  28. QUESTION:
    Any way to kill off the insulin producing area of your pancreas without killing the rest?
    If you have reactive hypoglycemia that doesn’t respond to diet, it makes your life a living hell. Wouldn’t it be better to just become a diabetic and control your insulin via injections instead of constantly getting low blood sugar and adrenaline spikes? At least then you can keep your sugar up when you sleep instead of waking with an adrenal spike every 2-3 hours EVERY night from having low sugar?

    We have worked with the top specialists at the University hospital and they can’t stop the high insulin levels. They don’t respond to meds and they have checked for insulin tumors and found nothing. When fasting, the levels remain normal but ANY food is a trigger for a massive dump of insulin. We have tried no carbs, minimal carbs, and no change.

    So wouldn’t it be preferred to be able to eat normal food again and sleep through the night as a trade off for diabetes?

    My son is going thru hell with this and the Doctors won’t do anything to help. They told him he will be a diabetic in less than 2 years at this rate because his pancreas will “burn out” but won’t operate and just make it happen now so he can go back to a semi normal life.

    • ANSWER:
      Diabetes isn’t exactly fun either. Sometimes it’s not as easy as simply taking an injection. Theres more to diabetes than just taking an insulin injection.

      I’ll use myself as an example (and I know I’m not the only one that this happens to). I’m a type 1 diabetic, I take injections with every meal, and check my blood sugar. Sounds easy, right? Well, the shot and blood sugar check is the easy part. I’ve got no problem with that. Its everything else that makes it hard. I figure my insulin dose based on carb content. If I dont count carbs exactly right, then I end up taking a little too much, or too little of insulin, which causes a low/high blood sugar a few hours later. Sometimes theres days where my diabetes seems to do whatever it wants. My routine doesnt change, diet doesnt change, amount of exercise doesnt change, but the diabetes does.

      any kind of stress affect blood sugar levels.
      illness affects sugar levels.
      exercise does to. You got to think about how anything you do during the day will affect your sugar levels.

      Also, different foods affect blood sugar differently even though they have carbs.

      I’d much rather be hypoglycemic than diabetic.

  29. QUESTION:
    Asalam w.do u know how fasting can actually improve your health?
    I read this article and it helped me learn what are the ways that fasting can improve someones health.Also on tv the sheik advises anyone with any health problem like high blood pressure ,diabetes,cholestrol to fast even during the fitr days .

    1. Attitude About Juice Fasting: One key to juice fasting over water fasting is the ability to prevent ketosis (disrupted carbohydrate metabolism in response to chronic starvation) by continuously providing simple carbohydrates that are used by your body for energy and nutrition to the cells. Some individuals, however, believe that carb overload is the reason why Americans are fat.
    2. Attitude about Skipping Meals: One study suggests that skipping a meal occasionally is not all that bad, especially if weight loss is a goal. However, be aware of changes in metabolic rate (see below).
    3. Autonomic Nervous System: According to this article, fasting appears to have a normalizing effect on the overall tone of the autonomic nervous system. This normalization decreases possibilities for a number of issues ranging from digestive disturbances to anxiety disorders.
    4. Awareness: Fasting can heighten awareness, depending upon the health of the individual, the goal for fasting and the ability to eliminate toxins from the system.
    5. Back Pain: Back pains caused by muscular tightness and stress rather than from bone disease or osteoporosis may be alleviated with a lighter diet or juice fasting.
    6. Bad Health Habits: In some people, fasting has helped break cravings for alcohol, tobacco, caffeine and some drug addictions.
    7. Blood Pressure: Water fasting may correct your high blood pressure to a safe range within two weeks without drugs. This level of pressure can be maintained if the diet is changed rather than going back to old eating habits. This study was conducted in a controlled setting.
    8. Cell Proliferation: This study, done on mice, showed that intermittent fasting slowed cell production, which also showed cancer development. Slowing down the rate of cell proliferation essentially buys time for the cells to repair genetic damage that may cause cancer.
    9. Cholesterol: One study about a 30-day Muslim fast showed significant decrease in LDL (”bad” cholesterol), total serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides at the end of the fasting period. There also was a significant increase in “good” cholesterol (HDL) that showed at the end of the fast and continued to show for one month after the fast.
    10. Chronic cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure: Fasting can reduce triglycerides, atheromas, total cholesterol and may increase HDL levels.
    11. Energy Flow: Through this logic, fasting enables the body to slow down to the point where the individual can listen to the body through the mind. This ‘vital force’ is clouded when the body is filled with toxins. However, one study with flies showed that the value of diminished appetite to an animal’s survival may vary with the infecting microbe.
    12. Fat Mobilization [PDF]: Fasting may move the body to mobilize fat stores from adipose tissue (the fat under your skin) to consume that fat as energy. Short fasts also may protect proteins in your body with the release of a growth hormone.
    13. Heart Health: The day-long, once-a-month fast many Mormons undertake as a part of their faith may help explain the lower rates of coronary artery disease in this population, according to a study presented at the American Heart Assn.’s scientific sessions in Orlando, Florida, in 2007.
    14. Homeostasis: Basically, your metabolic equilibrium, or ability to heal, could undergo a change during fasting. When fasting is employed as a therapeutic measure, it changes the playing field for disease and infection. This article quotes Louis Pasteur, “The pathogen is nothing, the terrain is everything” for an argument on why fasting can be used as a cure for injury or disease.
    15. Insulin and Blood Sugars: A study from the National Institute on Aging found that skipping meals frequently can help mice maintain healthier glucose and insulin levels. The study provides insight into the possible effect of fasting on glucose metabolism.
    16. Life Span: The point behind this list of articles and studies is that caloric reduction, overall, is one way to increase a life span. Lower metabolic rates, slower cell proliferation and less body fat that holds toxic matter all lead to a healthier life. This translates, for many people, into a longer life.
    17. Lifestyle: If you want to change your life to feel healthier and more productive, this author believes that fasting provides the pivot for that change.
    18. Mental Alertness: When toxins are removed from the lymphatic and blood systems, this change improves mental clarity. Eating less also results in energy conservation, which can be used by the brain for thinking tasks.
    19. Metabolism: While many people believe that a fast metabolism is key to weight loss,
    ramadan kareem

    http://current.com/1ubgm4c

    • ANSWER:
      Ramadan Mubarak……..
      thanks for the info……….

      @ batman, it doesn’t need proving, medicine proves it ask doctors & they will say that too… it relaxes the stomach.
      actually fasting is in all religions, not only islam…. the other prophets did it, just the months or day was different….

  30. QUESTION:
    I just found out that I’m pregnant- I’m 15, and need some help on exactly what I should do. Details inside.?
    I was on the birth control patch. However, I am on the epilepsy medication trileptal and I was prescribed the antibiotic keflex for a cellulitis infection I had from my diabetes. I was just informed by my doctor that both these medications significantly decrease the effect of the birth control, which is what led me to get pregnant.
    So yes, I am diabetic and epileptic. Now I’m pregnant.
    I am not going to get an abortion, and I know I need to keep my blood sugars below 180. This is going to be seriously difficult, but I am willing to do anything I can to make sure my baby does not get hurt. I will most likely go on a strict low carbohydrate diet and I believe I must go off my epilepsy medication because it is level C in the harmful effects towards pregnancy.
    Does anyone have any specific guidelines or pieces of advice which may help me through this? I really don’t need anyone to say that I have to figure it out by myself because I was stupid enough to have sex at such a young age. I already know that. I just want to step up and do everything to my ability so my child does not get affected because of my mistakes. Thanks for reading this, I really do appreciate it.
    My parents also know everything that is happening, I told them the second I found out.
    I have a doctors appointment tomorrow as well.

    • ANSWER:
      My advice would be to get a referral for an obstetrician from your doctor.

      You should alert the doctor who prescribed you the Trileptal (or the generic form, oxcarbazepine) that you are pregnant. I’m pretty sure there are other medications for epilepsy that aren’t a danger to pregnancy.

      Make sure you eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Also, you’ll have to get in 500 more calories a day (from healthy sources).

      Good luck with everything. By the way, make sure that the next time you’re on birth control, your doctor doesn’t prescribe anything that could interfere with it. A drug handbook is a good investment for checking out the things you’re prescribed. You could take it with you to the doctor’s office, and if he mentions a certain drug, you can look it up to see if it interferes. I recommend “Saunders Nursing Drug Handbook 2010″. It’s actually one of my textbooks for my pharmacology class.

  31. QUESTION:
    Someone please help me with my health homework? 10 POINTS?
    Question 1- The virus that causes __________ also causes itchy, red bumps.
    the flu
    chicken pox
    athlete’s foot
    an urinary tract infection

    Question 2- Pathogens are microorganisms that cure disease.
    True
    False

    Question 3- What is the common cold’s pathogen.
    Bacteria
    Virus
    Fungus
    Protozoan

    Question 4- Which childhood disease causes infantile paralysis?
    Mononucleosis
    Chicken Pox
    Mumps
    Polio

    Question 5- What is one disease most children are vaccinated against?
    Strep throat
    Measles
    Intestinal disorders
    Yeast infections

    Question 6- __________ are single celled organisms.
    Protozoans
    Inchworms
    Viruses
    Bacteria

    Question 7- Viruses are treated with antibiotics.
    True
    False

    Question 8- Diseases are spread only through direct contact with one another.
    True
    False

    Question 9- Which pathogen cannot be cured with antibiotics?
    Virus
    Bacteria
    Fungi
    Protozoa

    Question 10- Infectious diseases can be spread by any of the following ways except:
    candy.
    insects
    sunlight.
    water.

    Question 11- __________ is caused by a virus.
    The flu
    Toxic shock
    Botulism
    Tetanus

    Question 12- Polio is a disease that can be transmitted by the bite of mammals.
    True
    False

    Question 13- What deadly virus causes raised bumps all over the face and body?
    Chicken pox
    Tetanus
    Smallpox
    Bird flu

    Question 14- What disease is caused when fungus grows in the warm, moist area of the groin?
    Tapeworm
    Ringworm
    Jock Itch
    Athlete’s Foot

    Question 15- The pathogen for ringworm is __________.
    fungi
    virus
    bacteria
    protozoan

    Question 16- __________ is caused by fungus.
    The flu
    Pneumonia
    Athlete’s foot
    Diphtheria

    Question 17- What are two diseases transmitted by mosquitoes?
    West Nile virus and malaria
    Cold and flu
    Smallpox and chickenpox
    Rabies and Lyme disease

    Question 18- Viruses can be transmitted to humans through the bites of insects.
    True
    False

    Question 19- A disease that is characteristic of a particular local region is called:
    endemic.
    pandemic.
    disastrous.
    uniform.

    Question 20- Lockjaw is one possible effect of:
    anthrax.
    tetanus.
    E. coli.
    TB.

    Question 21- Insulin is:
    a component of blood that helps with immunity.
    not necessary for good health.
    made in the stomach to help break down fatty foods.
    a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life.

    Question 22- Which drug is used to control diabetes?
    Orvillin
    Insulin
    Penicillin
    Sulfa

    Question 23- What increases your risk for Type II Diabetes?
    Being overweight
    Regular exercise
    Healthy diet
    Lack of sleep

    Question 24- What are two factors that increase a woman’s risk for breast cancer?
    Maintaining a healthy weight and exercising regularly
    Eating a low fat diet and getting enough sleep
    Obesity and genetic factors
    No family history and no drugs or alcohol use

    Question 25- Two symptoms of someone having an asthma attack are:
    vomiting and diarrhea.
    the airway become swollen and produces thick mucus.
    insulin levels drop and headaches.
    insulin levels rise and breathing becomes easier.

    Question 26- When a tumor is benign it means:
    it causes cancer.
    the cancer is fatal.
    the tumor does not contain or cause cancer.
    the cancer will spread to other parts of the body.

    Question 27- A heart attack is a/an:
    aneurism in the aorta.
    blood clot that occurs in the brain.
    blood clot that occurs in the heart.
    aneurism in the lungs.

    Question 28- Two symptoms of diabetes are:
    chest pain and shortness of breath.
    constipation and no appetite.
    excessive thirst and frequent urination.
    stroke and body rash.

    • ANSWER:
      1. chicken pox
      2. false
      3. virus
      4. polio
      5. measles
      6. protozoans
      7. false
      8.false
      9. bacteria
      10. candy
      11. flu
      12. false
      13. smallpox
      14. ringworm
      15, fungi
      16. athlete’s foot
      17.west nile and malaria
      18.true
      19.endemic
      20.tetanus
      21. made in the stomach to break down fatty foods
      22. insulin
      23.being overweight
      24, obesity or generic factors
      25, airway becomes swollen and produces thick mucous
      26.the tumor does not contain or cause cancer
      27.aneurism in the aorta
      28.excessive thirst and and frequent urination.
      16.


Controlling Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

You can control and reverse high blood sugar levels with a new diet that has become very successful in the USA and England. The diet can give a normal blood sugar level and has many stopping their medication. Diabetes is a very serious disease that attacks the cells of the body. This illness is extremely serious and kills the body parts by ruining the cells. Those with this illness are advised to take it very seriously and not to delay fixing the problem. It is possible to control or reverse high blood sugar levels.

The enemy of the person with high blood sugar is time. As the diabetic waits, there is a spreading poison in the bloodstream. The high poison blood glucose damages the body. Here is why this is bad news many diabetics wait and or tries the old typical sugar free diets that have never healed diabetes. Sugar free diets cannot remove the poison blood sugar or stop the insulin problem that is causing the body to become destroyed. As the diabetic delays, the poison continues to spread. This is why many diabetics have had to have their legs removed. The legs were cut off because they were poisoned and the circulation was dead. You must reverse or control high blood sugar to save the body.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are some ways to control BLOOD SUGAR naturally?
    I am 17 years old and male. I haven’t been diagnosed with diabetes. I often feel tired, lightheaded and dizzy and want to feel better.

    What are some ways to control my blood sugar level naturally to prevent these symptoms?

    Please help.

    Cheers.

    • ANSWER:
      Why are you assuming your symptoms have anything to do with abnormal blood sugar? Light headed and dizzy may have nothing to do with your blood sugar at all.
      However, low glycemic level foods can keep your blood sugar stable. Do a Google search for “glycemic index” and include more low GI foods in your diet. If that doesn’t help, then your problems probably aren’t associated with your blood sugar level.

  2. QUESTION:
    how necessary is glucose testing during pregnancy?
    I have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) naturally. This is my second pregnancy. During my first pregnancy I also had gestational diabetes (high blood sugar). My baby doctor told me I had to go for glucose testing and said I had no choice. The reason I dont want to go is, the sugar drink made me very sick when I took it during my first pregnancy. When I was diagnosed with Gestational diabetes, all they did was send me to a diet class and give me another sugar blood tester which I already have. I do not at all believe I have gestational diabetes, I would know if my sugar levels were as out of control as they were when I had it during my first pregnancy. Even if i had it, I know how to eat, Im already diabetic. Is it really necessary to get tested? They give me the sugar drink, make me sit in the waiting room for hours, as I feel like im going to pass out, then they take my blood. Whats the point? My nurse yelled at me today and told me I need to get it done. Is it really necessary?
    no prescription needed for test strips or blood glucose supplies, i buy them at the drug store
    Neato, that is good to know but I am against inductions. I had a terrible time when I neared my due date with my son.My doctors were trying to force an induction on me, but I refused it. He came out 2 weeks late naturally, they checked the placenta and it was great. ty tho.

    • ANSWER:
      First you say that you have hypoglycemia the you state you have diabetes .This is confusing.
      First figure out what you have and make sure to do everything you have to for your own sake and your baby’s life.

      If you have a prescription for testing strips your insurance can pay for them and you don’t have to pay out of pocket.

  3. QUESTION:
    Has anyone with PCOS/PCOD lost weight and then conceived naturally?
    Hi,

    I am 26 and have always had irregular periods (sometimes going 8 months without a period). I had never been over weight. Docs said it was normal!?
    In december 2009 we had my implant taken out (which i had had in for 2 years roughly) and caught straight away.
    When i was pregnant with my son i put on a whoping 8 plus stones (i was a woman posessed with a hunger for donuts!). My son is now almost one and we have been trying for baby number two since March 2011 (6 months). I have not had a period since April 2011 6 months ago.
    I have now been diagnosed with PCOD. My doctor has finally refered me to a gynecologist who i am awaiting to hear from.
    Since having my son, i have lost 5 and a half stone. I now weigh about 13stones 12lbs and i am 5ft 6.5 inches. So i am still classed as obese. My doctor has said that because of my weight the gynecologist may well turn me away and refuse to treat me with any mediation. I have explained to my doctor that i can only lose weight so fast. She accepted this but said that they can be strict as to who they treat. Since then i have put myself on a really really strict diet and am in the process of joining a gym. i already do a lot of walking but what with the rubbish weather i need to join the gym really. its funny you know… my weight loss sort of stopped around the time of april 2011. this is exactly when i have stopped having periods. I think i had the pelvic scan in june. They saw the cysts then. I wonder if the fact that i had stopped losing weight and maybe eating not as good as i was when i was losing the weight has anything to do with my periods stopping. dont get me wrong i wasnt eating wildly as i didnt put any weight back on but at this weight i suppose i can eat a fair bit without putting weight on (i hope that makes sense). I think this because PCOS is all caused (as i understand it) from high blood sugar levels and its affect on insulin which therefore plays bloomin havoc with your old hormones! so hmmmm i am starting to wonder if my weight is playing a much bigger part in all of this, or rather my diet.
    Im guessing i have roughly 10 weeks (from last weds) when i will actually see the gynecologist. I am aiming to lose 3 lb per week so fingers crossed i will have lost 30 lbs by then. this would be fantastic. I am just dreading going to see the gynecologist and he turn me down because of my weight. i will be heart broken.
    however, in an ideal situation it would be fantastic if i lost this 30 lbs and my wonderful periods (never thought id ever say that!) come back to me!

    I would love really to hear stories from women and men in the same position as me and my partner to see there is hope or otherwise. I am praying it is my weight causing this problem because my weight is prob the only thing i have power to control. So, has anyone been diagnosed with PCOS/PCOD and lost weight and then started having periods again? And has anyone been treated by a gynecologist with medication Metformin or even better Clomid while they have been overweight?

    i hope i havent babled on too much just wanted to give you the full picture!

    thanks in advance for your replies! (please reply!)

    • ANSWER:
      I have PCOS. I was diagnosed at 16 years old, I am now 28. I was put on Glucophage (Generic name is Metformin) about 8 years ago to regulate insulin levels. I weighed about 200 lbs when I started. I now weigh 150. I am 5’7. I am still not where I want to be but I have lost a good amount of weight thanks to that medicine. We were unable to conceive naturally. We tried for 16 months on the Metformin only and had no luck. Then I took one round of Femara, which is another fertility drug out there right now. We conceived on the first cycle. They will probably start you out on the Metformin. It not only helped my weight, but it regulated my totally crazy periods I was having. I took Femara again this cycle and we are trying for baby #2. Good luck to you =)

  4. QUESTION:
    hwo can i get rid of a vaginal infection naturally.?
    my ph levels are really high. and i think its because of my un controled diabetes what are some natural ways to get rid of the infections along with keeping a controlled blood sugar it should go back to normal right?

    • ANSWER:
      Been there !! For yeast infections & vaginitus I take vitamin B6 & acidophilus daily, year round. I eat yogurt as a preventative measure. If you are infected you can put plain yogurt in your vagina. It really does work. I have gotten this advice from my OB.

  5. QUESTION:
    I really dont understand im 15 and i have to deal with this weird kind of polycystic ovaries?
    I’m 15 going to be 16 in september and was diagnosed with polycystic ovaries via a scan. I went to my doctor recently because i wasn’t getting my periods regularly which i thought wasn’t healthy, so i wanted him to prescribe something for me which were birth control pills. He said he has to do a blood test to see how my blood sugar (L.S.H & F.S.H) level was to confirm that i had Polycystic ovaries and he called today to let me know that my blood sugar level was actually low and he told me that its usually high when you have polycystic ovaries.
    I dont actually understand what that means I’m a size us 38 and am 5ft8 and i weight 64kg so i don’t think i really need to loose weight as i pretty much have none to loose. The only thing i have are irregular periods, and no other symptoms.

    1) Does that mean i have PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) or PCO (polycystic ovaries)?
    2) Do i still have polycystic ovaries even though i have low blood sugar levels?
    3) Would it be harder for me to conceive?
    4) Would it be harder for a woman with high insulin levels or low insulin levels to conceive whilst having polycystic ovaries?
    5) What do i need to do to prevent any damage to my ovaries and help regulate my periods naturally so i can be healthy enough to conceive in 5 years?
    6) Should i still take the BC pills?
    7) Does that Blood test confirm that i have Polycystic ovaries?

    (please answer my 7 questions)

    • ANSWER:

  6. QUESTION:
    Can you take Metmorphin (Glucophage) as needed?
    My mom went to the doc recently, and they gave her 3 different medications- synthroid for hyperthyroidism, metmorphin for high blood sugar, and zocor for cholestorol.. She checks her sugar every day though and usually is able to control it with the food she eats and things like that, naturally. She doesn’t want to take the metmorphin (which was prescribed to help lower her sugar levels) if she can handle herself naturally. She took it the first day and ate double portions, and it did what it said it would do. It lowered her sugar to 114 when normally if she eats just small portions (half of what she ate w/ the med), it’ll read at around 120. So she wants to just eat the small portions and just take the synthroid for thyroid and the cholesterol med. But she also said that she’ll take the metmorphin to lower her sugar on days where she wants to eat more and stuff like that.

    The bottle says take every day with your biggest meal. She wants to just take it when she needs it. I was wondering, could that be bad for her? Is glucophage (metmorphin) a drug that you can take as needed, instead of regularly?

    • ANSWER:
      Metformin needs to be taken every day, no occassionally. You need to maintain a current level in your blood at all times and if you don’t, your blood sugar may fluctuate dangerously.
      It has no bad side effects, so don’t be nervous about taking it all the time.

  7. QUESTION:
    I really dont understand im 15 and i have to deal with this weird kind of polycystic ovaries?
    I’m 15 going to be 16 in september and was diagnosed with polycystic ovaries via a scan. I went to my doctor recently because i wasn’t getting my periods regularly which i thought wasn’t healthy, so i wanted him to prescribe something for me which were birth control pills. He said he has to do a blood test to see how my blood sugar (L.S.H & F.S.H) level was to confirm that i had Polycystic ovaries and he called today to let me know that my blood sugar level was actually low and he told me that its usually high when you have polycystic ovaries.
    I dont actually understand what that means I’m a size us 38 and am 5ft8 and i weight 64kg so i don’t think i really need to loose weight as i pretty much have none to loose. The only thing i have are irregular periods, and no other symptoms.

    1) Does that mean i have PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) or PCO (polycystic ovaries)?
    2) Do i still have polycystic ovaries even though i have low blood sugar levels?
    3) Would it be harder for me to conceive?
    4) Would it be harder for a woman with high insulin levels or low insulin levels to conceive whilst having polycystic ovaries?
    5) What do i need to do to prevent any damage to my ovaries and help regulate my periods naturally so i can be healthy enough to conceive in 5 years?
    6) Should i still take the BC pills?
    7) Does that Blood test confirm that i have Polycystic ovaries?

    (please answer my 7 questions)

    • ANSWER:
      1) with abnormal blood sugar levels and irregular periods it is likely that you have polycystic ovarian syndrome. the reason your blood sugar is low is because your body is producing too much insulin (the hormone that levels out glucose levels in the blood). the excess insulin then causes the other issues with cysts on your ovaries and excess androgens which cause your period to be irregular or non-existant. do you have acne or abnormal hair growth? these are also signs of PCOS.

      2) yes you most likely still have polycystic ovaries. they say that you cannot actually cure PCOS or polycytic ovaries, although the symptoms can be alleviated

      3) yes it can be harder to conceive once youre ready to have a family. if youre not ovulating they can put you on a drug called clomid which will induce ovulation and make it so that youre able to conceive. vitex berry is a good supplement to help regulate your periods and may even help ovulation return to normal. the other thing is that its good to be on metformin when you want to have a baby because the miscarriage rate with PCOS is about 50/50. metformin reduces this risk to about 8% which is even lower than in normal pregnancies which have a 15% risk.

      4) having your insulin levels messed up doesnt affect conception directly, but it does mess with your other hormones (estrogen, progesterone, androgens) which then in turn messes with conceiving and sustaining a pregnancy. it also gives you a risk for developing gestational diabetes.

      5) there wont be any damage to your ovaries. however, the clock can tick a bit faster for women with PCOS so its good that youre planning on having a family in your 20′s. getting a prescription of metformin will help to regulate your insulin levels. but, you can also help your body with this by cutting out all refined sugar and white flour. sticking to a diet of mainly fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and some whole grains makes it so that your glucose doesnt spike, which means your insulin wont spike as a result and then leave you with low blood sugar and feeling tired. your doctor doesnt sound that educated in regards to PCOS. i suggest seeing a OB/GYN… preferably a female as sometimes they just ‘get it’ when it comes to our hormones and everything.

      6) its a good idea for now to continue with your birth control pills since these will help to regulate your cycle

      7) the blood test only confirms if you have the syndrome… an ultrasound confirms if you have cysts on your ovaries. what i dont understand is that your blood sugar was messed up and he thought this was fine. its not fine. also, even though most women with PCOS are overweight, many are thin… in fact it’s about half. there are several PCOS support groups on facebook.

      i had two miscarriages in the past year which made me seek out an endocrinologist. i had an ultrasound showing that i had polycystic ovaries, but all my bloodwork came back perfect. while i was waiting for the results (two weeks) i researched all this stuff in depth. its very manageable and if you go into trying to start a family with some knowledge of whats going on, then you can definitely avoid the heartache of infertility and miscarriage. good luck to you =)


Controlling Blood Sugar Levels For Diabetics

Treatment of yeast infection does not cause yeast infection, but treats the yeast infection.

Re-infection occurs if the treatment course is not completed, or if one partner with an active yeast infection is not treated. It is best to finish the entire treatment course and to recommend partner treatment if they are infected. An allergic reaction to treatment may produce additional lesions, so it is important to note if the infection is not getting better during treatment.

Recurrent or relapsing Candida balanitis that present after a full course of medications is not uncommon and it may be due to an increased susceptibility to chronic yeast infections (e.g. diabetes, uncircumcised penis, etc).

Despite therapy, recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, defined as 4 or more episodes of infection per year, can occur in less than 5% of healthy women. Recurrences may be caused by other species of Candida that are not equally susceptible to the usual first-line treatments with antifugal creams. Appropriate fungal cultures may be taken to identify the species.

Yeast infection medications are the same for men and women, and can be prescribed by the doctor or obtained over the counter (OTC). The medications prescribed by the doctors may have a shorter course than OTC yeast infection creams, however both still do a good job of treating yeast infections in both men and women. Recurrent infections require longer courses of antimycotic therapy for 10 to 14 days.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Why is aspartame dangerous for diabetics? How does it affect one’s blood sugar level control?
    I’m doing a research paper on aspartame being a bad thing and I really need help. I know aspartame keeps blood sugar levels out of control, but HOW? I need an explanation badly. Thanks!

    and if u could include other reason why aspartame is not safe and explanations why, It’ll be of great help. =D

    • ANSWER:
      Aspartame is an artificial sweetener and is approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose, or table sugar.Upon ingestion, aspartame breaks down into natural residual components, including aspartic acid, phenylalanine, methanol,and further breakdown products including formaldehyde and formic acid, accumulation of the latter being suspected as the major cause of injury in methanol poisoning. High levels of the naturally-occurring essential amino acid phenylalanine are a health hazard to those born with phenylketonuria (PKU), a rare inherited disease that prevents phenylalanine from being properly metabolized.because its breakdown products include phenylalanine, aspartame must be avoided by people with the genetic condition phenylketonuria (PKU).

      asprtme helps to contro blood sugar..
      it does not directly control blood sugar, but indirectly patient take lee amount of sugar, so diabetes is conrtolled.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the “normal”, (non-diabetic) blood sugar ranges, before and after meals?
    I have diabetes II, and want to use diet and exercise to improve my health. My doctor doesn’t spend much time answering my questions, and I can’t get a straight answer about the normal ranges for blood sugar for non-diabetics, which I want to compare to my own, to see how far off I am (rather than just pulling out pills or insulin to normalize my blood sugar levels. If I find a particular food or activity makes my condition worse, I want to modify my activity level, or food choices. I want to take control of my condition, not just be lazy and take pills.
    I am 62, and have diabetes II. I am not significantly overweight (only 20 lbs). I want to take control of my own health, and use diet and exercise to improve my health. I know how my blood sugar reacts when I eat certain foods, but would like to know what the ranges are for “normal”, non diabetics, (before meals, 2 hours after, etc.) so that I can have a goal to work towards. I can’t seem to get a straight answer on this. My doctor said to use insulin “temporarily”, then later said that most people have to stay on it once they start. I know other diabetics whose blood sugar levels are much worse (double what mine are), who don’t use insulin, (though significantly overweight, and inactive) and while I want to improve my condition, I don’t want to do anything stupid, and make my condition worse.

    If I have the “normal” range as a goal, and can see how certain foods or activities effect me, I can attempt to modify my food choices and activity level to improve my health.

    • ANSWER:
      I just received this information that you are asking for from my nutritionist last week.

      People without Diabetes
      Fasting – 70-100
      2 hours after meal – 70-120

      People with Diabetes: Ideal
      Fasting – 80-120
      2 hours after meal – 100-140

      People with Diabetes: Target
      Fasting – 80-140
      2 hours after meal – 100-160

      I am a T2, diagnoised 2 months ago. My doctor set these goals for me.

      Fasting – less than 105
      2 hours after meals – less than 130

  3. QUESTION:
    I have read that Chromium supplements can reduce Diabetic Blood Sugar, does anyone have any experience of this
    I started taking Chromium supplements about 2 months ago.
    The form is ‘chromium Picolinate’ 200 micro grammes per tablet.
    I started with 1 tablet per meal and am now up to 3 tablets per meal.
    The results are not conclusive.
    Is is safe to up the doseage to 4 per meal to see if there is a beneficial result on the lowering of Blood Sugar levels ?

    Has anyone had any experience with Chromium supplements, that might help Diabetics control their Blood Sugar levels ?

    Thank you for any suggestions
    Naresh
    I am so grateful to everyone.

    Your suggestions have helped me and hopefully anyone else with a similar condition.

    I must stress that I did take advice from my doctor and since I was on the doorstep of Injected Insulin, he suggested that I try it.
    With no information about safe tolerance levels I had to experiment and see how my body reacted with pre and post meal Glucose testing.

    The doseage on the side of the chromium picolinate bottle did not have any effect over a period of time and is designed to protect the manufacturers from any lawsuits.

    Yahoo answers has allowed me to receive your gifts of knowledge and experience. Thank you.

    I hope the answers help others, as everyone’s metabolic rate, lifestyle and stress levels are different.

    Once again, please discuss any changes to your dietary supplementation with your health advisor.

    I look forward to all suggestions.

    Kind Regards
    Naresh

    • ANSWER:
      Chromium is but a small part of a complete diet, exercise, and supplement treatment for diabetes. Read my diabetes info page for more:

      http://www.geocities.com/seabulls69/Type_II_Diabetes.html

  4. QUESTION:
    Diabetes – When to test blood sugar level?
    I was recently diagnosed with diabetes (controlled through exercise and diet, no meds at this time). I’ve gone to a ton of websites and read literature on diabetes, but cannot find a straight answer about testing my blood sugar.

    For diabetics out there….
    When should I test?
    Should I test after fasting (say after sleeping) or before a meal?
    How soon after a meal should I test?
    How many times a day?

    Thanks for your help! :-)

    • ANSWER:
      Testing for Type 1′s and insulin using Type 2′s is a bit different from your case. Type 1′s need to regularly test to ensure their BG level is not in a dangerous range and adjust their insulin. They may test up to 12x a day is some cases. Type 1′s using an insulin pump usually test often. Most Type 1′s average about 6x per day if they use multiple daily injections.

      If you are a new Type 2, you may want to start on a regular plan just to see how your levels are fluctuating during the day. You aren’t on meds or insulin, so you don’t need to worry about low blood sugar. Your main goal is to make sure you are not running too high and are unaware of it.

      For the first few days, test in the a.m. (fasting), 2 hours after breakfast, before lunch, 2 hours after lunch, before supper, and you guessed it…2 hours after dinner. You may also want to throw in an evening pre-bed check or two.

      You want to see if your fasting (before eating) levels are in range at all meal times, and how your are doing after you eat.

      That way, you will know if you need medication, or just need to adjust your diet (eat less carbs at dinner, for example).

      If all is fairly well, and you are following a healthy diet and exercising, you can test randomly on different days to make sure you are staying in range. If not, call your doctor to see if you need medication.

  5. QUESTION:
    Why is sugar bad for diabetics?
    With all the trouble diabetics have to go through to monitor and control their blood sugar, what is so bad about about fluctuating sugar levels? What are the long term effects from fluctuating or high levels of sugar?

    • ANSWER:
      There are MANY complications that can result from long term high blood sugars.

      If you think about it, blood travels through pretty much every part of your body. High levels of glucose can damage blood vessels by essentially weakening the walls of the blood vessels:
      *in the retina, can cause retinopathy which can lead to vision impairment or blindness
      *take longer for wounds to heal, resulting in problems with controlling infections
      *kidneys, nephropathy, kidney failure (leading cause of kidney failure in the developed world)
      *increased progression of atherosclerosis
      -coronary artery disease
      -stroke

      High levels also can damage nerves resulting in peripheral (nerves of legs/arms/feet/hands) neuropathy or autonomic neuropathy (nerves assisting internal organs, eg. stomach, intestine, and many more).

      There are literally hundreds of diabetic copmplications arising from prolonged elevated blood sugar.

  6. QUESTION:
    Can any one get Diabetics, who does not have a family history of Diabetics?
    Is it possible to get affected by diabetics who is not having a history of the same in his family? I mean, wheather it is a disease purely controlled by genes or heridity or any one can got affected? I am 40 years of age and there is no diabetic history in my family. Recently when I checked the blood sugar using a glucco meter it showed more than 3 times the normal blood sugar level. Is it dangerous to not to go for medical assistance? or can it be cured by controlling food only?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of diabetes is multifactoral. It involve interaction of our gene and our diet and lifestlye. People with family history of diabetes is more prone to get diabetes compared to those without family history especially if he/she do not control their diet, take sugar excessively and seldom exercise. But if they control their diet and avoid sugar, they might not get diabetes eventhough they have family history.

      To determine whether you have diabetes, you have to take blood during fasting, usually in the morning before breakfast. If you take blood half an hour after meal then your blood sugar will be high eventhough you dont have diabetes. The glucometer reading usually not so accurate as the result given by analyser in the hospital laboratory. If you are worried, please see a doctor and do a fasting blood glucose. Only then you can tell whether you have diabetes or not.

  7. QUESTION:
    What is a good birth control for diabetics?
    I’m a diabetic and I want to go on birth control, but I don’t know how it will react with my diabetes…so is there any good birth control out there that won’t mess with my blood sugar levels or…what is a really good birth control in general?

    • ANSWER:
      I have never heard of any birth control method causing any problem for someone with diabetes.

      What is good for you is partly a matter of preference and convenience (can you remember to take a pill every morning) and partly a matter of effectiveness.

      A gynecologist would be a good resource for an informed opinion on the options you have.

  8. QUESTION:
    What are some at-home remedies to drop blood sugar in type 1 diabetics?
    My boyfriend got diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 23. It’s been a little more than a year, but his diabetes is not very well controlled. His meals are usually between 29 and 35 carbs, sometimes a few over that. He eats when his sugar is at about 130. Usually when its lower than that, but a lot of the time he ends up dealing with levels near 250, sometimes near 300. He and I are both wondering if there is something he could maybe eat or drink that would drop it (besides beer, since that doesn’t work all the time) thanks for any input.

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    How long should one wait before starting on an after-dinner walk in order to reap the full benefits?
    This question has great relevance especially for diabetics trying to control blood-sugar levels. So, please try to provide a medically sound answer .

    • ANSWER:
      usually wait about 30 – 40 mins that way the food is somewhat digested and you will have the most energy at this time.

  10. QUESTION:
    any ayurvadic medicine for TYPE I DIABETICS.?
    am a 17-year-old boy and am suffering form type I diabetics and now am on daily insulin twice a day. using human insulin N and R in daily basis and i would like to know that is there any ayurvadic medicines which can be effectively control my blood sugar level without assistance of any insulin…..

    • ANSWER:
      All people with type 1 need insulin daily.

      When it was discovered in the early 1920′s, insulin was [ and still is ] a life saver.Prior to that , people just died.

      Remember how lucky you are to have insulin so that you can live a normal life.

      http://www.discoveryofinsulin.com/Home.htm

      http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/445672_2

      http://www.ehow.com/facts_5498585_diabetes-before-insulin-discovered.html

  11. QUESTION:
    do you think this would be a good christmas present? (diabetics?plz answer)?
    my uncle has type 2 diabetes. balsam pear tea is supposed to help control blood sugar levels in that type. i was thinking of getting him some for christmas but i don’t know if he even likes tea. but it could help him.

    so what should i do? should i get him some to put on the side with my parents present? or should i just forget about it and get him some other small gift? non edible because i obviously would not want to give him sugary xmas stuff.

    • ANSWER:
      My husband is also type 2 diabetes. I would try it as a gift you never know he just might like it and to know that you care about him like that is very thoughtful. And if you want to make the gift a little nice try to find a cup that he would like. If he has a team that he loves or even one that looks funny or has a funny saying on it that he could use all year round that would be a nice gift set all together.

      Hope this helps you.

  12. QUESTION:
    Do blood sugars jump around in non-diabetics?
    I’m not a diabetic, but my friend is, so I decided to check my blood sugar for two days (yesterday and today). I took the test today fasting and my first reading came back 88. I decided to test again, so I did and it was 94. I thought that was high, so I used his control solution to test the meter and the meter was accurate, so I tested again and my level was 104. Yesterday when I tested fasting I had 83 the first time and 82 the second time. Is it normal for blood sugar to jump around like this when your not a diabetic? I know all of my levels are considered in the “normal” range, but 104 was scary to me. Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      a NORMAL blood sugar reading is ANY reading in the range 80-120 a 94 is great, and so is the 104.

      NO ONES blood sugar stays at one constant level. The actual reading depends on WHEN, WHAT, adn HOW MUCH you ate, how much you have exercised, your general health level (do you have a cold), AND your personal stress level.

      FOOD is the primary reason that blood sugar goes high. If you eat birthday cake and cola before taking the test, your reading WILL be high — maybe 300 or more. But 4 hours later, you will be hungry again, and your blood sugar reading may be 115. ONE high blood sugar reading is NOT to be worried about!

      Exercise is supposed to lower you blood sugar level, but in fact, during the exercise and for about an hour after, exercise actually RAISES your blood sugar . it is the LONG TERM effects of exercise that are important, NOT the immediate changes.

      Your physical and mental health conditions have large effects. If you have an infection your blood sugar WILL go high. Your body is producing its own sugars to help the white cells fight the “invading” germs. ANd your mental health level ALSO affects blood sugar . If you have job or marital stress, your blood sugar will be high. It is important that you always deal with stressful situations in a quick and positive manner. Don;t “stuff” stress! Don’t hide it — talk it out!

      If you don’t eat for 10 hours (like, going ot bed), then you blood sugar will be LOW. If it drops lower than 70, you need to talk to your doctor about possible Hypoglycemia.

      Blood sugar readings jump around ALL the time. In fact, if you use the same meter and take another test 30 minutes later, you will get an entirely different reading.

  13. QUESTION:
    diabetic pt who is out of control. her blood sugar fluctuates from low to high. Goes low every night?
    my aunt has battled type 1 diabetes for years and has never taken care of herself properly. she would drink and smoke and just generally not care about her health. She was started on the insulin pump awhile back and her pump was faulty and was sending her out of whack insulin levels. But she has since got a new pump and she is still always running low. She uses people that love her and medications to her advantage. she will sleep all day and will not eat. she will drop so low that she can not eat or drink and she will have to get a glucagon shot then drink cokes. she regularly has a blood sugar in the teens. She is know living with my elderly grandmother who can barely take care of herself let along another person. My grandmother has to set the alarm every two hours to check her sugar cause my aunt will not wake up and check it herself having to give her a shot or atleast make her eat or drink something. I am wondering if there is a home thats for diabetics or is that just a nursing home? I do not know what to do. i know it is a matter of time before she kills herself and my grandma whos already suffered two strokes. anyone that has any information that will help us is greatly appreciated. PS my grandma has been cooking her three full meals daily so i know she has been eating but is still low. maybe she is boosting her pump to much herself? i jsut dont know what to do
    thanks for your input. see thats the thing i know its like a drug addict she needs to want to take care of herself. im a paramedic student myself. She has a specialist and has had one for years. She will be up around 300 before bed and a few hours later my grandma will hear her she will be in her low 20s even teens. Then medics come give her D50 and she comes back she drinks and eats and denies transport. its a regular thing. I am concerned more with my grandma because this is causing her problems. her diabetes have been like this for years so i dont see her changing. but i know my grandma would rather die trying to help her rather than kicking her lazy ass out and making her grow up and take care of herself. did i mention shes almost 50 and had diabetes since she was ten years old. i repeat nothing, we just dont know what to do. reason i am asking on here is i live out of state and can do nothing for them physically

    • ANSWER:
      oh gosh this is very bad indeed :( Being that she’s a type 1 diabetic, her pancreas is not making any insulin at all which makes her insulin dependent and therefore she absolutely NEEDS insulin to survive. The fact that she drops low and high also is very dangerous. If she drops too low she could go unconscious and may need to be rushed to the hospital. Going too high can also cause progressive iriversable damage to her kidneys, eyes, blood vessels…

      I would really think it would be helpful for her to speak to her health care physician. Why is she not monitoring her glucose? There must be a reason. Perhaps someone could ask/discuss the issues with her. Her doctor needs to discuss with her how much insulin she she needs to be taking. This will depend on how much food she eats and what her blood sugar is when she checks it. There usually is a “scale” they give people so they know how much insulin to give themsevles for how much they ate.

      Sorry if I wasn’t more help but ultimately it is up to her. There’s no diabetic clinics that I know of but an assisted living home would be an alternative.

  14. QUESTION:
    Does diabetes make you moody?
    I’ve been a Type I diabetic for 16 years, no complications yet, but lately I’ve felt as if my mood and energy is negatively affected by changes in my blood sugar levels. I’m in reasonably good control, test several times a day, but inevitably it is a balancing act and having diabetes implies that glucose levels are never stable. I have, however, noticed that my mood improves when I limit my carbohydrate and starch intake, eating more protein. I also tend to get very, very tired when my blood sugar is above, say, 180 or so and I literally fall asleep when it hits about 230. I feel cognitively lethargic when it gets to this level as well, which is incredibly frustrating. Anyway, it’s a constant balancing act, and I’m just wondering whether other diabetics also feel as if their moods are more volatile compared to non-diabetics?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, type 1 is definitely a constant balancing act. Everything that you do will affect your blood sugar level. I agree that our moods are more volatile compared to non diabetics. When my blood sugar goes above 200, I also feel very lethargic. When it drops too low, I become Satan. Every time my ex-boyfriend and I would get in a fight he would tell me that I needed to check my blood sugar because I was being mean. It would infuriate me, especially when he was right.

  15. QUESTION:
    Diabetes & Birth Control…help?
    Hey, I have Cystic Fibrosis related diabetes, and it’s well controlled, I am able to maintain my A1c very well, and I am at a very healthy weight, I’m about 126 and 5’7, and 21 years old. I am going to my OB-GYN in a few weeks, and I know I will get better answers from them, but what the heck kind of birth control do you use for diabetics? I have been with my boyfriend for about 4 months, and we’ve been sexually active, but I still want that extra re-assurance of birth control, but everything that I have read pretty much says that BC pills and hormones make blood sugar levels rise. I really don’t want to change what I have going, because it took me a really long time to get where I am today, so I wanted to hear from other female diabetics and their birth control experiences. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Diabetics can take any birth control so do not worry.
      The oral contraceptive pill is as effective on a diabetic as any other woman.
      Any changes in sugar levels will be almost non existent.
      I am diab and have been on pill without any side effects (or failures) for years.
      Good luck

  16. QUESTION:
    Diabetic Father With Problems. Help Please…?
    My Father, 46 years old was told by the doctor that he’s a diabetic a few years ago. He wasn’t experiencing much problem by then and continue living a normal life. Unfortunately, recent happenings have me wondering about his health. When he went for a body check and blood test last week, he was told by the doctor that his blood sugar level is rising very rapidly and might have to get injections to help stabilize it. I know it’s quite critical now, so, if any of you out there have any ideas how to lower blood sugar normally without injections, please, tell me. I need your help, especially diabetics with good control over their blood sugar level. Your help will be highly appreciated. Thank you…
    I really need help, so please don’t fool around…. Like the 1st answerer… Please, i really need help. Go fool somewhere else…PLEASE

    • ANSWER:
      Diet and medication can control his sugar. Your best bet would be to see a Nutritionist, I am surprised that your Dr. did recommend one for him. Find out from your healthcare insurance if you need a referal to see a Nutritionist, then have your Dr. give a referal to see one. your dad needs to stick to his diet and watch what he eats. He needs to monitor his sugar very closely.
      If your dad is not insulin dependent your Dr. may prescribe a combination of pills, diet and insulin injections.
      To read more about Diabetes & assistance you can go to the American diabetes association website. They give information about diabetes and they can get you in contact with support groups if you’d like. remember though your Dr. can only give a proper analysis of what your dad needs right now. Good Luck.

  17. QUESTION:
    Have you read that lady’s fingers and barley could be used to treat diabetes?
    I posted this question yesterday, and it got reported this morning for violation. I don’t know why anyone would report something that might be life saving. Anyway, here’s posting the question again with the information.

    I received an email from a friend with the following information. If you are diabetic or if you have friends who are diabetic, perhaps you could consider the following information? The recommendation isn’t meant to replace insulin treatment – rather it is to complement the existing treatment – I suppose there is no harm trying the recommended treatment, since lady’s fingers and barley are natural, healthy vegetables and grains. :)

    +++

    “Please note that another name for Lady Finger (Bhindi ) is ” OKURA “. Last month in one of TV program I learnt of a treatment of Sugar (Diabetes). Since I am diabetic, I tried it and it was very useful and my Sugar is in control now. In fact I have already reduced my medicine. Take two pieces of Lady Finger (Bhindi) and remove/cut both ends of each piece. Also put a small cut in the middle and put these two pieces in glass of water. Cover the glass and keep it at room temperature during night. Early morning, before breakfast simply remove two pieces of lady finger (bhindi) from the glass and drink that water. Keep doing it on daily basis. Within two weeks, you will see remarkable results in reduction of your SUGAR. My sister has got rid of her diabetes. She was on Insulin for a few years, but after taking the lady fingers every morning for a few months, she has stopped Insulin but continues to take the lady fingers every day. But she chops the lady fingers into fine pieces in the night, adds the water and drinks it all up the next morning. Please. try it as it will not do you any harm even if it does not do much good to you, but U have to keep taking it for a few months before U see results, as most cases might be chronic.”

    —–

    “Diabetics should eat more barley as the fibre will prevent blood sugar levels from rising too high. It also provides relief from constipation or diarrhoea for those suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome.”
    I am not sure how much scientific support and research have been done on this recommended treatment. I suppose you could google “lady’s fingers”, “barley” and “diabetes”. It is up to your discretion on whether you want to implement this treatment, and how best to implement it.
    I guess some westerners may not know the asian natural methods of healing and health. They have no concept of heatiness and cooling effects that food can give, though it’s a generally known fact amongst asians. Lady’s fingers are common in asia, especially in third world countries, though I think many supermarkets in USA should sell them.
    Thanks for your faith-filled words, bro gj3. Thanks for your kind words too, sis Tallulah. I received the testimony from a friend’s email, so I thought it’s encouraging to share with people here. I think complementary medicine sounds great – I agree with your doctor’s advice.

    • ANSWER:
      Most of the medical doctors restricted taking a herbal supplements during their treatments. The reason being is FDA did not approve to use it and there is no money making behind this. My doctor do not want me to take herbal supplements during my chemo therapy. But I still taking it. God said “I will provide everything that you need here on earth.” That is including this herbal supplements. In Revelation Jesus talking about the leaves of the tree of life will heal the nations. I know this is for the future events. I believed that there is application here for our own good. Like for example these herbs that they discovered that good in our health. In the same thing the “organic foods” that available to us right now. If we will stay on this “organic foods” I believed that we will live longer and healthier. We made our own problems when we use our own idea to make more money and forget about our health. I’m not saying all but some of the farmers that they produce our food at the market, they put steroids on their plants, animals and we end it up eating these and the result is obesity that cause of cancer, diabetics and many more disorder in us. The FDA should attack this issues but they were silence about this because they make money out of this things. Our food right now are so infected of hormones, pesticides, and all other things that will kill us slowly. Yes, I believed some of the herbs were located in the third world countries. I came from the Philippines and we used all kinds of herbs to heal our wounds, sore throat, common colds, and many more. Even though God blessed us with His wisdom and talents to make our own medicine from chemicals is not a bad idea and God provides us with these herbs to heal and cure our body. Now we need to choose what to eat. Organic or not. These will accomplished in according to His will, and His own time in our life.

  18. QUESTION:
    Diabetes Question & Your Teeth?
    I have been to the dentist on many of occasions. I have had teeth removed, x-rayed, and filled. The dentist told me that my teeth were all hallow inside. The jaw teeth both bottom and tops. The teeth are nice and shinny on the outside of the teeth because I brush them often and floss them. Before, I told him that I had diabetes. He looked at me and said, “You must be a diabetic.” I ask him about it and he told me that in some diabetics the pulp in their teeth dies and disappears because their blood sugar levels is out of control or their blood is not normal. He said it was a way for him to know if a patient has diabetes even it the patient does not know they have it. How much truth is in his statements. Could someone do research into that area of study? I later ask my youngest son’s dental surgeon whom works at the Children’s Hospital and, he said the very same thing.

    • ANSWER:
      It’s called Periodontal disease, sir, and it’s more common in diabetes patients. This does NOT mean, however, that all diabetics will suffer with it.

      There are many pages on the internet that offer advice and explanations about periodontal disease. Here are just a few.

  19. QUESTION:
    Teenage diabetic type 1 help?
    Well. I am a sixteen year old teenage girl and I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a year and a half ago (precisely 13 Jan 2010…had an exam the next day and I was clueless about it).

    So far, I find myself able to control my levels…if I bother. As in, if I check my blood sugar levels regularly, I usually manage to accurately estimate how much insulin I need to take for a meal…with the occasional mess-up here and there.

    The main problem is in the following fact. I am desperately unmotivated, at times, to regulate my blood sugar. It may be the fact that I get annoyed by how I have to check how much I am allowed to eat, what I am not ‘allowed’ to have, how everyone who knows about my ‘situation’ seems to avoid wanting to talk about it and mostly how I find myself unable to talk to another girl about certain issues which affect us…in terms of our menstruation cycles and pregnancy and what not.

    Now I want to go to someone to talk…be it a consultant or a psychologist. I just feel the need to converse with someone who will treat me like I am a mature and sane person (and I am…personality wise at least) and not relay everything back to my parents, since my mom openly worries a lot until it gets suffocating ( but she is getting better ) and my dad is in denial of the fact that I am indeed ill and that there is a problem which needs to be solved. So when I start a topic of wanting to go to someone and talk about it, my dad brushes it off, saying that ‘There is no need sweetie. There is no problem. If you want, we can make an appointment with your endocrinologist…where one of my parental units will attend.
    My mom, on the other hand, started crying and then, after calming down, offered to talk with me about it, on the basis that she was a type 2. But I do not deal well with crying women…especially if I am the cause. So I tend to not tell anyone in my family if I am going high or low unless it is somewhat a bigger than usual problem.

    School is not really an option…because our system is a ridicule in, and of itself. There is no order whatsoever and you can kiss confidentiality in the a**. Of course, that is ignoring the fact that out ‘consultant’ is very hard to find in school, if she even exists.

    Now, all I am searching for in this long speech of mine…is help, since obtaining any in real life is incredibly…hard.

    I want someone to give me motivation. Because, no matter what I do, there is always this week where I refuse to take insulin, until after the meal by 2-3 hours…when I start feeling parched and guilty. Self-motivation can only take you so far.

    And if it wouldn’t be too much trouble…are there any diabetics who got the condition before getting pregnant? I am still young, and I do not plan on even attempting the act before I am 22, but I am really afraid… I want to give birth, but I refuse to have my babies harmed in any way. Would you please provide advice or a way of communication…it is one topic which keeps nagging in the recess of my mind during the day.

    Second thing: While I can control my blood sugar when I choose to(most of the time), my snacks are usually unhealthy. Any tips for integrating healthy habits into my daily routine…like kinds of fruits(I eat most of them…aside from apples.) or home-made, satisfying meals, would be greatly appreciated.

    P.S. The reason for the excessive details was a silent request for whoever would provide the advice to seek help from a doctor/other professionals. I am not willing to face the trials in order for that to happen. What I basically want, is assurance backed with firm evidence.

    Oh…and I am usually hyper and un-depressed, so no need for any worrying from that sense

    Thank you in advance.

    Cheers :D

    • ANSWER:
      Here’s a second recommendation for tudiabetes.org. It is an online networking site for diabetics. I call it ‘Facebook on insulin’. Almost everyone on there has diabetes themselves, and if they don’t, they are the loved one of a diabetic. There are discussion groups for various interests including a few for teens/young people with Type 1. I think you would be able to find people who really understand what you are going through.

      For what it’s worth, here’s my two cents. So diabetes sucks big time and so we all wish we didn’t have a horrible incurable disease. But the complications of diabetes suck even bigger time. That’s what motivates me to keep going – I concentrate on a picture of myself blind, limbless and attached to a dialysis machine and I think, no thanks. That’s not going to be me. And the best way of making sure that’s not going to be you, is to take control of your diabetes and not let it take control of you.

      Something you said about what you are ‘allowed’ to eat. Actually, as a Type 1 diabetic, you are allowed to eat anything you want. You just have to bolus insulin to match your food. You have complete flexibility over your diet! Of course, you shouldn’t go insane and drink 3 gallons of regular Coke in one sitting. But if you wanted to have a donut (22g carb), French fries (32g carb for a small serving) or a KitKat (15g carb) – go ahead and do it! Just make sure you inject the insulin to match that. If you don’t know how to carb count, now’s the time to learn.

      You will find it most mentally liberating once you realize you CAN eat anything. It is just a matter of matching insulin. Of course, you have to be sensible about this, but you sound like a sensible person.

      As for pregnancy – I was diagnosed with Type 1b last June and am now 15 weeks pregnant. There is no reason why diabetics cannot have safe pregnancies like everyone else. The main issue is that blood sugar levels need to be kept as close to non-diabetic as possible. That means A1C of under 6.5 before you try to conceive. Under 6 is even better. When blood sugar is at non-diabetic levels, the risk goes down to the same as a non-diabetic woman. But when blood sugar is uncontrolled, diabetic pregnancy is high-risk and faces the chance of birth defects, stillbirths, and harm to mother and baby.

      Finally your question about ‘unhealthy’ snacks. Well, define unhealthy. From a diabetes management point of view, anything that raises your blood sugar beyond the safe range is unhealthy. I don’t eat ‘healthy’ snacks like bananas or granola bars because they are extremely high in carbs and raise my blood sugar beyond the safe range. Yes, I could inject insulin for them but those things don’t excite me enough to want to inject insulin. Whereas ham and cheese roll ups won’t raise blood sugar by much, neither will nuts, avocados or olives. The point is that you have to think about what ‘healthy’ means because when you have a serious carbohydrate metabolism dysfunction, what is ‘healthy’ for you is not the same as what is ‘healthy’ for people with normal metabolisms.

  20. QUESTION:
    What is a good diabetic meal plan for a 35 year old diabetic man ?
    Please help me out. I need to know the answers to these questions but i dont have the book because i cant afford it for class :(

    Your client is a 35 year old male diabetic who maintains his weight and controls his blood glucose levels on 2600 calories a day. His usual eating pattern is:
    breakfast:3 starch, 1 fruit, 2 milk, 2 meat
    lunch: 3 starch, 2 fruit, 2 veggie. 3 ,meat
    snack: 2 starch, 1 fruit, 2 meat
    dinner: 3 starch, 2 veggie, 4 meat
    bedtime snack: 2 starch, 1 fruit, 1 meat

    2. use table D-1 in the appendix of your textbook to determine the grams of carbohydrate in each meal and his total grams for the day.

    3. how many of his calories should come from carbohydrates each day (use the AMDR range for carb of %45-65%)

    4. Hiw many grams of carbohydrates should he consume each day (use your answer from question 3)

    5. Does his usual eating pattern contribute more or less carbohydrate than what he should consume?

    6. Diabetics’ carbohydrate intake should be evenly distributed throughout the day to help maintain constant blood glucose levels. How would you adjust his eating patter to attain a more even distribution of carbohydrate?

    7. Develop a 1-day meal plan for this client by translating his usual eating pattern into food choices (use appendix D for serving sizes and foods in each food group.)

    8. If he is hungrier than usual but does not want to increase his blood sugar levels by going over his “allowed” carbohydrate levels, what are three foods he could safely eat?
    dinner: 3 starch

    • ANSWER:

  21. QUESTION:
    Major Help Please! How can a juvenile diabetic lose weight safely?
    Hello there, and thank you so much for reading this!
    Okay so first things first i am a diabetic diagnosed at the age of 12. Im 16 yrs old, about a good 165lbs, 5’3ft tall (not really sure if this helps) and i am struggling to get my blood sugar levels under control (as well as my weight) I’ve been to my doctor recently and she’s constantly telling me i need to exercise more. Lately, I’ve been jogging (or fast paced walking) on a treadmill for 30 min each day at around 3 mph
    I would like to know if this enough exercise for me or do i need to do more work.
    Also, i would love to know if any other diabetics have lost weight by actual exercise. I would love to hear some stories to get me motivated :)

    *Additional details*

    I absolutely DO NOT want to resort to weight loss pills. I have heard they are unsafe and only result in making your weight worse. My closest friend tried them and she tried selling me some.

    I started cutting down on fats and sweets as well as my portions.

    Also, since im using a treadmill, do I need running shoes? I’ve been running in my Converse lately and find my ankles hurting after I exercise.

    And finally, any tips on how to control your blood sugar levels? Oh, and my chorestrol levels are on the bad side right now :( If you could give me some tips on how to lower them down (besides eating cherrios) that would be very kind of you :)

    Thank You so much to anyone who answers my question!! :) This would certainly help me alot and hopefully help me to have a more healthier lifestyle! and p.s im sorry i wrote so much

    • ANSWER:
      As you probably know by now, anything you do will affect your blood sugar. The safest thing to do it just eat healthier and exercise more. Keep checking your blood sugar often and stick to the carb limits your Dr has set in place. Doing those things will allow you to lose weight and be as in control as a T1 can be.

  22. QUESTION:
    How important is the Diabetic diet?
    Hiya,

    I have been going out with my diabetic (type 1) bf for over a year. Everything I have read about it seems to suggest that people with diabetes should be on special, healthy diets etc.

    He doesn’t follow any special diet at all. He eats pizza,etc /drinks occasionally- often not on the diet shown for diabetics. And we both eat loads of sweets and biscuits.

    He says he can eat what he wants providing he takes the right amount of insulin.

    I went to hospital with him and they said his sugar control is very good – he seems to be able to tell, though he almost never checks his blood sugar levels.

    I love him so much and although his diabetes affects him, other peoples lifestyles seem to be more affected by it. I was wondering why the strict diet for diabetics? Is there anything wrong with what he does? Can other people with diabetes share their experience or tell me why some people see the diet as so important?

    • ANSWER:
      Your Bf is correct.You treat for the carbs you eat.
      It would be best if he did check his sugar more often so he is sure of what he is dealing with .

      We are allowed to make poor nutritional choices like everyone else.

  23. QUESTION:
    what is a proper blood glucose level for insulin resistant people?
    My Dr diagnosed me with it and told me to keep my sugars under control with diet and exercise and Glucophage. But he failed to tell me how often i should be testing and what the normal level is. I remember when i was pregnant it was 120 but is that only for gestational diabetes or all diabetics? HELP.

    • ANSWER:
      you should try to get as near 100 as possible!! Any reading over 125 is damaging to eyes and nerves.

      You should be checking fasting – when you wake up, and randomly during the day.

      Journal everything!! a steno pad works well for journaling. Put down your readings, your foods, your exercise and for a while when you’re sleeping! It will give you a clue as to what foods you really don’t want in your food plan, no matter what the dietician or CDE suggests for you to eat.

      Yep, your doc patted you on your butt and said watch the sugars!! they do that!! Dumb doctors!!! they can’t explain so they avoid.

      did he give you reference to dietician? to CDE? to Endo? give you Rx for meter and strips?

      did he tell you that glucophage/metformin works best if taken at the beginning of a meal?

  24. QUESTION:
    Can anyone recommend a diabetes cookbook that matches all this criteria?
    I don’t actually have diabetes but have a high blood sugar level that has to be kept under control to avoid getting it.

    - GI ratings for every recipe and detailed nutritional information including calories/kilojoules etc

    - Desserts that are suitable using either concentrated fruit juice (perhaps unlikely because it is a high GI sweetener but I guess it is possible the overall recipe could be low GI) or stevia/stevioside that are created in such a way to hide the bitterness and licorice flavour of the stevia or no sweetener at all.

    - All genuinely good for diabetics without too high a GI or too many carbs

    - Ingredients that can easily be obtained in Melbourne, Australia (but it can be from US or other country because I can easily convert the ingredients)

    - Most of the recipes must be reasonably easy to cook (don’t have to be all that easy) but preferably a mixture of easier and more complex dishes and not too many recipes that take an awful long time.

    - Not have salt added or be ok without salt or some alternative to salt such as balsamic vinegar

    - Recipes created mostly from scratch without having to resort to commercial supermarket items that have added salt, sugar, preservative etc

    - And of course they must taste good.

    • ANSWER:
      Don’t buy a cookbook. There are plenty of recipes online that don’t cost you a thing. Try going to www.dlife.com not only do they have recipes they also give the nutritional values of each. Here are a couple of more sites that give the nutritional values of the recipes as well.
      www.nubella.com
      /www.changingdiabetes-us.com
      www.diabeticlivingonline.com

      Also you might want to take a look at a web site called
      www.fitday.com and www.sparkpeople.com
      Both of these are great sites for helping to manage what you eat, your exercise, and overall health.
      Hope these help you. Good luck.

  25. QUESTION:
    I am a diabetic, and at night…?
    I wake up to use the bathroom a lot. Sometimes I even get up four times a night. Sometimes I go, and then I wake up an hour later and have to go again. I don’t always even have to go that badly, but I can’t fall back asleep because I’m uncomfortable. I’m 19, I’ve had diabetes for 16 years, and went on the pump almost four years ago. My blood sugars were good until my parents started to let go and I started to take over, but now they’re getting better because I’ve been working and I have better control. I exercise several times a week and I’m eating much healthier. I know that diabetics urinate more frequently, but seriously, this is annoying! My sugar levels aren’t even high anymore. Is there a reason why i’m going so much (I use the bathroom too much during the day too, it’s embarrassing, but it’s more inconvenient at night), and is there anything I can do?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there my friend! Well, you might check your blood sugar at night. When I get up frequently at night its because my sugar is either too high or too low. Even though it’s controlled during the day, the liver dumps sugar into the bloodstream at night. When this happens, your sugars can go sky high. If it’s too low, then just have a snack before bed, carrots or celery, something of that nature because you don’t want to gain weight. Just try taking your glucose level when you find yourself getting up a lot. This should help. Your kidneys are working overtime and that’s no fun either. Diabetics don’t naturally urinate more than anyone else unless their blood sugar levels are off. When mine are normal, I usually urinate between 5 and 6 times a day and rarely at night unless my sugars are too high.

      You might want to try a Macrobiotic diet. I know that it helps me greatly. (I’m type 2) It’s based on whole foods, grains, vegetables, fruit in season, nuts and seeds. You don’t eat breads, dairy, meat, or any sugar, but you can have fish once a week. It’s a natural diet. If that is too strict for you, then you might want to check out the diet that is in The China Study. It’s a heart healthy diet that also works for diabetics. It is pretty much a Vegetarian diet, however you can have some meat on it.

      Best of luck and I really hope this helps you!

  26. QUESTION:
    Diabetics: what would you do if your doctor…?
    I am a low-income Type 2 diabetic. I receive health care through a community clinic, so I am limited in my options.

    I have been seeing my new doctor since December last year. After getting my lab work back, he was relieved to see that my kidneys were fine. He asked how long I had been diabetic and then responded, “Oh, you haven’t been diabetic long enough to have kidney disease.” Like the simple fact that I am diabetic means that I’ll get diabetic complications. My A1c has been in the 5% range for YEARS.

    The last time I was there, he was so impressed with my A1c and blood sugar log that he told me that he thought I was misdiagnosed as diabetic. I was taken aback. When I was diagnosed, my A1c and random blood sugar were off the charts. There’s NO doubt that I am diabetic. I insisted that I am, told him why I thought so, and that I just work really hard to control my blood sugar, but he said, “I still think you may not be diabetic.”

    Right now I’m feeling like he’s a raging incompetent about diabetes. I know that beggars can’t be choosers and I should just be glad I have health care, but I’m sort of disgusted and wondering if I should request to switch doctors at the clinic or maybe go elsewhere. The only reason I’m reluctant is because I don’t want word of this getting back to him if I can’t switch and I don’t need any special treatment or an endo because I have good control. He’s “sufficient.” I was offended that he had so little faith in me, condemning me to kidney disease, and then I was another level of horrified when he said I wasn’t diabetic.

    What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, congrats on your exemplary glycemic control.

      I don’t have any statistics at hand but from talking to my GP, I get the impression that most diabetics do not have such good blood sugars.

      For instance, my GP told me I am the only diabetic patient with the clinic who has a 5% A1C.

      I think some doctors even believe that diabetics can never have normal blood sugars. Also in the past, diabetics invariably deteriorated because people knew a lot less about blood sugar management. But things have changed so much now, and as you yourself know, diabetics have so many tools to control their disease and not let it control them.

      We also know that the higher the A1C, the greater the risk of complications. Sadly, the risk never goes down to zero, no matter how good the A1C.

      Finally I’d like to suggest that if that doctor spends a lot of time working in low-income areas, it is likely he sees lots of poorly controlled diabetics who, for various reasons, end up eating a high carb diet. He probably sees them deteriorate quickly and thinks that everybody’s going to end up like that.

  27. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have type 1 & type 2 diabetes?
    If A = If you’re fit and have diabetes, and your family has a history of diabetes, there’s a good chance you’re Type 1.
    B = If you’re fat, there’s a REALLY good chance you’re Type 2.
    So if I’m fat but I’ve been overweight my whole life but always tested no hi glucose levels or hi cholesterol & I’m healthy otherwise for years until recently I found out I have a enlarged heart and high blood pressure I’m on beta blockers & I’m on both a long lasting insulin shot 1x a day & take2 glipizide pills to control my levels.They say glipizide is type 2 that I take but I also take a insulin shot 1x a day which is type 1 so I’m confused I take both so am I type 1&2?I think I may of inherited or my genes because my father he wasn’t fat or unhealthy until around 50 he became a diabetic & had high blood sugar & kidney failure& quad bi pass & skin cancer & colon cancer.So I think I may of got diabetes by heredity from my fathers bad genes not because being fat.He was skinny.Allot people just automatically think I’m diabetic because of my weight. I believe it’s heredity.I have a 21yr old daughter that’s overweight but tested neg for diabetes& is very healthy,my son is 24 & he eats more then me & daughter & he is super lazy&does less exercise but is skinny as a board all his life he can eat a ton an not gain 1lb. I have learned allot people have their own opinions but really don’t know diabetes info allot doctors still learning.So how do I figure out what type I am or is it possible to be both types 1&2?I’m confused & my doctor is a idiot he seems to not know what type I am 1or2.I’m currently trying to find a diff doctor. I’ve learned a regular MD can not help me I’ve been to 2 neither has helped me get my sugar under control & are not smart.I have fought with being overweight my whole life my weight has not caused the diabetes. I have been obese since birth & no amount of exercise has helped at all &I’ve tried all.The kicker is I gain a little each year no matter what that I can’t loose ever I’ve spent a ton on diets & weight watcher programs nothing will make me loose & I don’t over eat I’m lucky if I eat two reg meals not large meals or unhealthy fattening meals no sugar intake at all with no snacks daily,but I stay fat. What kind of specialist can get my diabetes,high blood pressure &heart issues & unknown reason for a hi white count diagnosed and treated & get all under control & maintain control that will help me with all these issues to stay well?What type diabetic am I or is it possible to be both & what type doctor do I seek?Another question where do diabetics dispose of their used needles at I asked my pharmacist he said throw away hide in middle of my trash which I’m sure is not right!can anyone help with info?

    • ANSWER:
      Wow! Can you write or what? 8^)

      First of all, yes it is possible to have both type 1 and 2, but I think it’s rare. I have diabetes in my family, various deceased ancestors who lost legs and kidneys and died relatively young. But nobody in the family knows whether they had 1 or 2, and I wonder if they even had the distinction at the time. Type 1 and type 2 are completely different diseases, but with the same symptoms and the same results.

      Type 1 used to be called ‘juvenile diabetes’ but lots of people get it later in life. You can get it at any age really. Type 2 does NOT just happen to people who are fat. I’m Type 2 and was never that fat, though I’ve lost weight since.

      Type 1s need insulin to live, because their pancreases don’t produce enough. But these days lots of type 2s are using insulin also, to help overcome their insulin resistance. The nice thing about insulin is that it isn’t even considered a drug. Our bodies make it. So it has no bad side effects, unless you take too much of course. On my e-mail list there are lots of type 2s who have just started using insulin after being diabetic for years and years, and they all say they wished they’d tried it sooner, that it makes blood control just that much easier. Insulin is also used for patients who react negatively to the other blood-control drugs, like glipizide

      If you really want the details, ask your doctor if he can refer you to a diabetologist. That’s a doctor who specializes in diabetes. I’m surprised there aren’t more of them these days, since diabetes is almost an epidemic nowadays.

  28. QUESTION:
    Diabetics have you ever had this problem?
    Hubby is a diabetic. lately he has been having more trouble keeping his sugar at an acceptable level.We knew this was coming as the doctor told us that over time it gets harder.But what really concerns me is he is so wiped out lately. today at 5 pm he took his sugar for the first time today( note our household runs on a third shift schedule so this would actually be early to mid day for him) and it was 235 and he hadn’t eaten or drank anything at all. He is due back to the doctor on the 25th of this month but I’m thinking he needs to go back earlier.My sister in law tonight said she was wondering it it was his adrenal system(? okay I admit I’m clueless on this). He’s tired all the time, no energy,has to force himself to eat, and I might add he also has had a back surgery.He became diabetic after the surgery.What scares me the most is he says he feels like he is dying! wtf! I guess my question is if you are diabetic when did keeping your sugar under control become harder and does any of what is going on with the hubby sound familiar to you. his blood pressure ,triglycerides, and weight are all good also the last time we were at the doctor his A1C score was a 6.5. Any idea what is going on?

    • ANSWER:
      Sometimes diabetes doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. Take those mornings that your husband wakes up with blood glucose that’s higher than it was when he went to sleep. You’d think that not eating for those seven or eight hours would give him a lower blood glucose.

      The dawn phenomenon is a natural rise in blood glucose between the hours of 4:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., and it occurs because of hormonal changes in the body.

      Treatment for dawn phenomenon depends on how he treat his diabetes. If he take insulin, he may be able to adjust his dosing so that peak action occurs closer to the morning rise in his blood glucose. If he has type 2, diabetes pills provide options as well adding Metformin as it aids the liver.

      The Somogyi effect, named for researcher Michael Somogyi, PhD, who studied and first described it, is his body’s response to a low that he had while he was sleeping. The body responds to those hormones by raising blood glucose—sometimes too much.

      He would treat this the opposite way of how he would treat dawn phenomenon. He could have a snack before he goes to sleep or reduce his insulin infusion at night. If he takes NPH, he can switch to an insulin that won’t dip him down at 3:00 a.m. It’s a good idea to check his blood glucose if he wakes up sweating or with headaches, as those are signs of a low.

      Sometimes his insulin just runs out or wears off. Then it’s a matter of him and his doctor adjusting his insulin regimen accordingly. If it’s insulin waning, he could look at splitting your basal insulin or taking it at a different time of the day. If he takes NPH at supper, he could move it closer to bedtime.

      Before he and his doctor can adjust his diet or medications to handle high morning blood glucose he has to know what’s the culprit. There’s one simple way: Check his blood glucose at 3:00 a.m. for several nights in a row. You need to see where his blood glucose is at bedtime, at 3:00 a.m., and in the morning. If his blood glucose is fairly even between bedtime and 3:00 a.m., but then rises between 3:00 a.m. and morning, chances are he’s experiencing dawn phenomenon.
      If his blood glucose is low at 3:00 a.m., he’s most likely experiencing the Somogyi effect.
      If his blood glucose is higher at 3:00 a.m. than at bedtime and higher still in the morning, his insulin is probably waning or not working properly.

      His having diabetes, chances are he’ll experience the occasional high morning blood glucose. That’s not something to fret about too much. But if it happens regularly, then it’s time to call your doctor. He should also suspect a problem when his morning blood glucose is the highest of the day, and when it is consistently high for the rest of the day after that. If it’s significant, it should be dealt with because those who have high blood glucose in the morning tend to have high blood glucose all day, so its important to seek his doctor’s care and have him/her get your husband’s blood sugars stabilized in order to prevent diabetic complications– try to do this as soon as you can.

      Hope this helps.

  29. QUESTION:
    are you struggling with type 2 diabetes?
    i was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 3 years ago. for the first years i struggles to control it with diet before the doctor gave me metformin. the metformin gave me acute upset tummy and i have struggled for 2 years with it.
    then i came across a book saying i could reverse my diabetes. so i thought… i have nothing to loose. My sugar was peaking at between 30 and 32.

    The book explained that type 2 diabetics hold fat molecules in their muscle cells. it is these fat molecules that stop the body from using the insulin it produces.

    the solution it seems is easy. If your body holds on to fat molecules then don’t put fat into your body.

    so 2 weeks ago i started a vegan diet. 1 week into my new diet and i had a check up with my nurse.
    my normally high blood pressure was totally normal for the first time in 3 years. my sugar level has almost halved and was peaking at 17.
    i weighed in over 12 lb lighter than i had previously.

    on week later (2 weeks into my new lifestyle) my sugar is peaking at 7.9, i am (according to my nintendo wii) 6 lb lighter than i was this time last week and i have so much more energy than i have had in years.

    the book said give it a month. i have reversed my diabetes in 2 weeks.

    i don’t feel like i am on a diet, actually im not on a diet i have just stopped eating meat and dairy products. i love cooking with spices and i have discovered tofu and lentils.

    really people… i don’t get that if it is so simple to do then why are doctors not recommending this to everyone

    • ANSWER:
      Your numbers are a little exaggerated . 32 is very close to US numbers of 600. I doubt that you would have survived for 2 years with these numbers.
      Besides it not possible to really control if you are eating tons of carbs.

      Nice story though !

      Tin

  30. QUESTION:
    What is a good diabetic meal plan for a 35 year old diabetic man ?
    Please help me out. I need to know the answers to these questions but i dont have the book because i cant afford it for class :(

    Your client is a 35 year old male diabetic who maintains his weight and controls his blood glucose levels on 2600 calories a day. His usual eating pattern is:
    breakfast:3 starch, 1 fruit, 2 milk, 2 meat
    lunch: 3 starch, 2 fruit, 2 veggie. 3 ,meat
    snack: 2 starch, 1 fruit, 2 meat
    dinner: 3 starch, 2 veggie, 4 meat
    bedtime snack: 2 starch, 1 fruit, 1 meat

    2. use table D-1 in the appendix of your textbook to determine the grams of carbohydrate in each meal and his total grams for the day.

    3. how many of his calories should come from carbohydrates each day (use the AMDR range for carb of %45-65%)

    4. Hiw many grams of carbohydrates should he consume each day (use your answer from question 3)

    5. Does his usual eating pattern contribute more or less carbohydrate than what he should consume?

    6. Diabetics’ carbohydrate intake should be evenly distributed throughout the day to help maintain constant blood glucose levels. How would you adjust his eating patter to attain a more even distribution of carbohydrate?

    7. Develop a 1-day meal plan for this client by translating his usual eating pattern into food choices (use appendix D for serving sizes and foods in each food group.)

    8. If he is hungrier than usual but does not want to increase his blood sugar levels by going over his “allowed” carbohydrate levels, what are three foods he could safely eat?
    dinner: 3 starch

    • ANSWER:
      That is FAR too much starch for a diabetic. Bet this guy’s blood sugar levels are well above safe levels.

      He should be checking his blood sugar to see what a safe level of carbohydrate is.

      Fruits are pure sugar and will raise blood sugar just like starch.


Controlling Blood Sugar Levels Gestational Diabetes

In Diabetes especially type 2 the signs and symptoms might not be so apparent, because the condition evolves gradually during a period of many may be acquired inside a

routine medical check-up. Signs and symptoms are rapidly relieved once diabetes is treated and stored in check. For those who have any of these signs and symptoms speak

to your Physician. Early diagnosis, treatment and good charge of diabetes is essential to prevent developing serious diabetes complications.

How diabetes could be stored in check naturally?

Tacoma Diabetes is among the quantity of illnesses which are more prevalent today than in the past. Conventional

healthcare leads individuals to think that there’s not a way for stopping diabetes which diabetes sufferers should be on medication for that relaxation of the lives. However, you

will find quantity of natural options you can use together with healthy diet to deal with as well as cure diabetes. Many doctors is only going to prescribe medicines for diabetes

and won’t give what other advice.

A couple of good examples of natural alternative and outline of a good diet plan for diabetes sufferers.

Diet Recommendations: – A dietary plan composed of fruits, veggies, whole grain products, and beans is fantastic for somebody who has diabetes. Diabetes

sufferers can tolerate fruits because fruits retain the sugar fructose. Digestion of those meals is slow leading to sustained energy for lengthy amounts of time. Blood sugar

increases gradually to ensure that blood insulin need not hurry directly into turn the sugar into body fat. Consequently, you won’t get really hungry soon after eating. These

kinds of meals assistance to safeguard other illnesses enable you to lose and control weight, and take away waste out of your colon.

Celery, cucumbers, and string beans are specifically advantageous for diabetes sufferers. The skins of natural bean are extremely wealthy in silica plus some the body’s

hormones which are carefully associated with blood insulin. String bean tea may serve as an alternative to blood insulin. Cucumbers have a hormone that’s utilized by cells

from the pancreas to create blood insulin.

Herbal Medicine

Many diabetes sufferers are going through the options of herbal medicine to cope with their condition. Bitter melon, Onion, and Garlic clove have been shown to help lower

bloodstream sugar. Extracts from Bitter Melon can be created into tea and brought regularly. Another essential nutritional supplement may be used is Sugar Crush and Sugar

Crush Daily for Type-1, Type 2 diet, Gestational Diabetes sufferers and Pre diabetes sufferers also. Sugar Crush works within the

digestive tract while Sugar Crush Daily works within the Bloodstream stream. Both of these supplements compliment one another.

The advantages include

  • It will help to keep healthy bloodstream sugar levels
  • It will help to keep healthy glucose metabolic process
  • It will help to aid healthy weight reduction
  • It will help to aid healthy pancreatic function
  • It will help to stabilize fasting and publish-meal bloodstream sugar levels.

Only your timely detection and treatment can cure your diabetes. Know more about the Seattle diabetes and diabetes cure

at: http://www.seattlediabetes.com

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is a high level of blood sugar during gestational diabetes to have big babies?
    I am consistently checking my blood sugar and it is usually 95-105 in the morning. I am usually 115-160 after eating. I am wondering if these levels are too high and will cause me to deliver a large baby? I do not take insulin or diabetic pills, so far I have been diet controlled. What are high levels that WILL cause you to have a large baby.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you’re too high. Based on your numbers, I would say that you’re not diet controlled. You need to stop the refined carbs, and switch to more wholesome natural foods if you want the healthiest possible baby. You should also include some daily exercise and bring your weight down. Instead of concerning yourself with numbers that might cause a large baby, you should be shooting for normal blood sugar levels and let the baby develop naturally.

  2. QUESTION:
    low blood sugar while having gestational diabetes?
    I am 32 weeks pregnant with gestational diabetes. I have it pretty well under control and I tend to keep my blood sugar levels around 105-119.

    All day today it has been low. My highest has been 92. I’ve been dizzy. I’ve tried eating a sugary snack and nothing helps.

    What could be causing this? what can i do?

    • ANSWER:
      You should call your doctor. In many women their blood sugar will get noticeably lower shortly before they go into labor. This happened to me at 36 weeks and I went into labor 1.5 weeks later.

  3. QUESTION:
    What can I do to help my blood sugars? Gestational Diabetes?
    I am gestational diabetic and 28 weeks pregnant. I am the pickiest eater ever and I’ve been that way since I was a young child. I am a huge pasta eater. I have to go to a diabetes center every month and test my sugars 4 times a day and take insulin before each meal. It is such a hard thing to remember since I have only been on insulin for a month now. I am so used to being able to eat whatever I want. Thing is is when I was diagnosed with GD (about 10 weeks) my sugar levels were fine. Now I am seeing a little higher numbers. It seems more now than ever I am craving sugary sweets. My job makes it hard to eat the meals I need to eat. It frustrates me cause we are short staffed right now so I really do not have time all the time to eat a meal which I know is bad. I need some advice on what to do. I want a healthy baby. What are the risks if I can’t keep my sugars under control the highest my blood sugar has ever been was 180. never higher than that and that only happened once. Usually when it’s higher it’s 140-160 now. It’s so stressful. I’m not huge on alot of veggies but I love fruits and fruits cause my sugars to go up also. I can’t eat alot of fruit. 1/2 a piece of fruit is 15 carbs and I am only allowed 30 carbs for bfast and 60 for lunch and dinner. Any advice would be wonderful. The docs think I may have been diabetic before becoming preggers but wouldn’t my levels be much higher if I was previously diabetic? My 3 hour glucose test was technically normal one OB told me but they wanted to monitor it just to be safe.

    • ANSWER:
      First off, to answer your question: running sugars in the 140-160 range consistently WILL have an affect on your baby. The higher sugar puts extra weight on the baby – not only is that more difficult for delivery, or could cause you to have to be induced early, but it adds unnecessary fat cells to your child for life. Also, there is a complication that can happen where the placenta deteriorates in women with uncontrolled diabetes. It’s not common but the less control you have, the higher the risk.

      I’m not trying to scare you, but you do need to know the risks of running those numbers.

      You have insulin – haven’t you been advised to adjust your dosage up? If not, talk to your doctor because that is certainly an option. It’s completely normal and expected for your sugars to require more medication to control the farther you are along in pregnancy. It’s a function of pregnancy hormones.

      As for diet – my advice for a pasta lover is to seek out Barilla Plus Pasta. It’s high-protein pasta and it also tastes better than most of the whole wheat varieties. I have great blood sugar results with Barilla Plus.

      Any time you eat fruit you have to have protein with it. If you’re hungry, go up on your protein (or veggies, but you say you don’t eat them).

      Sugary sweet cravings is tough, but try to remember you’re in the home stretch. There are a few tricks, like taking unsweetened cocoa powder and mixing it with light cool whip. It’s really good but you still have to limit your serving size. Another one is to take chocolate protein powder (you can find these in GNC or similar stores) and shake it up with fresh popcorn. You still need to count the carbs in the popcorn but 1 cup of popcorn at a time is so low-carb that it’s under 20 calories if airpopped.

  4. QUESTION:
    How many weeks is normal for delivery with gestational diabetes?
    I am 33 weeks along with gestational diabetes. I have been doing very well with my blood sugar levels and my diabetes is controlled by diet.

    Is it likely that my doctor will let me carry to 40 weeks?

    • ANSWER:
      They will put pressure on you to induce early. I’m a type 2 diabetic and went 40 weeks + 1 day for my first pregnancy, and my daughter was 7 1/2 pounds. It’s not always medically necessary but a lot of doctors nowadays seem to push diabetic moms into early induction.

  5. QUESTION:
    In gestational diabetes, how to control the feeling of thirst? Is it reqd. to chk blood sugar level daily?

    • ANSWER:
      To control the thirst you need to make sure you sugar levels are under control and the ONLY way to do that is by testing REGULARLY! I have diabetes (I am pregnant but I was diabetic before) so I know how hard it is (I have to test 10 times a day).

      But it is very important for not only you, but for your baby as well.

  6. QUESTION:
    What do my blood sugar levels mean?
    I had a test last week for gestational diabetes and I failed the test (non-fasting, 50g glucose, blood tested 1 hour afterwards, result 9.2 mmol/L). I have another test coming up this week for confirmation. I know if it is confirmed I will get education about it but this diagnosis doesn’t just affect me, it affects my baby too so I couldn’t just wait a week not knowing. I got a blood testing machine and have been testing my blood sugar levels and googling it. I am now really confused. Can someone (with diabetes or a nurse or something) please tell me what my blood sugars mean?

    Yesterday
    5 hours after lunch – 4.7 mmol/L
    6 hours after lunch – 3.9 mmol/L
    1 hour after dinner – 5.9
    2 hours after dinner – 5.2

    Today
    Before breakfast – 4.0
    2 hours after breakfast – 6.7
    2 hours after lunch – 4.8

    Sorry I don’t know how to convert those numbers into the ones that are used in the US. As far as I can tell from googling, all of the numbers are normal except the one after breakfast today. What does that mean? Does it mean that my normal diet is enough to control it except for my breakfast (2 slices of raisin toast this morning)? The test was done in the morning too.

    Background info. regarding my risk factors – my dad and uncle have type 2 diabetes. I was at the top end of my healthy weight range before I got pregnant. Sorry the question is so long and thank you!
    Sorry I didn’t mean to offend anyone by implying that only overweight people got diabetes. It was my midwife that told me that was a risk factor. She was asking about my weight prior to pregnancy and looking at how much weight I had put on during the pregnancy.

    On the day I got readings in the normal range I ate a chicken and salad sandwich and a banana for lunch and pasta with tomato, spinach and pumpkin sauce for dinner so it was still carbs.

    • ANSWER:
      All the readings are OK except for the 6.7 and of course, the 9.2.

      It would have been helpful to know what you ate at the meals after which the blood sugar was in target range.

      It could well be that you are glucose-intolerant and that’s why you had high readings after the GD test (pure glucose) and the raisin toast (all carb becomes pure sugar in the blood, even whole grains). If that’s the case, then you might be lucky enough to be able to control your blood sugar simply by watching the carbs.

      As for your risk factors, it is a cruel myth that being overweight causes diabetes. It does not. Type 2 diabetes is strongly genetic.

  7. QUESTION:
    Diagnosed with gestational diabetes and my gluclose reader gives me different readings?
    I was just diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes and I have to prick my finger 4 times a day to be sure my sugar levels are normal and controlled.
    And yesterday I pricked myself and it read 97 i decided to double check and i wiped my finger off with a alcohol wipe and squeezed where the prick was and then it said 107?
    is this normal for the gluclose reader to be doing? is there really a difference in that first drop of blood? and witch answer would i go by?

    • ANSWER:
      I had gestational diabetes too and my machine did something similar. Not sure if the first or second is better or more accurate. I always used the first. Just be sure you have clean hands. Also be sure to rotate fingers and where on the finger you test, your fingers will get sore and eventually toughen up. I kept a journal that logged what I ate and then what my sugar was to help me adjust. It was a pain to test and watch what you eat, but it’s all worth it in the end and chances are it will go away after delivery. Mine went away right after birth, but I’ll most likely have it with this pregnancy too. Good luck :)

  8. QUESTION:
    What is the accurate level of diabetes during pregnancy?
    Hi i am 28 weeks pregnant and i am suffering from gestational diabetes and from last week i have been monitoring my blood sugar levels by following a special diet and regular exercise. And after all this my sugar level has come under control but sometimes it comes in between 5m/mol and sometimes its just under a required level that means 6.7m/mol (after meal). So i was just wondering as long it comes under 7m/mol is good or as lower is better?

    • ANSWER:
      Lower is better, but this is not something you should stress too much about as long as it’s under 7. Stress can actually raise blood glucose. Keep up the healthy diet, exercise daily, and don’t fret.

      You should be aware that many women who have had gestational diabetes will develop type two diabetes later in life. You should also be aware that you can prevent it. The most important thing you can do right now is learn all you can about a healthy, high nutrient, low carb Calorie diet. Basically what that means is more raw natural fruits and vegetables and fewer man made products which are often stripped of important nutrients. The nutrients that keep your cells and organs healthy. When cells become unhealthy, they become insulin resistant. That’s when your pancreas produces too much insulin as the blood sugar levels go up. That can cause several things to happen and that is why such a high percentage of the population is unhealthy. For more, look up metabolic syndrome to see exactly what is going on in your body. Watch the video linked below, it’s revealing:

  9. QUESTION:
    Gestational Diabetes… is there any way to avoid having a larger baby?
    I know that controlling my blood sugar levels is the main thing but are there other ways???

    • ANSWER:
      Having a larger than average baby is just one of the things that can happen when a woman has Gestational Diabetes. Not all babies born to moms with Gestational Diabetes are large. I had Gestational Diabetes with my 4th pregnancy. I did not have her until I was 41 weeks and she only weighed 6 pounds 14 ounces. Managing your glucose levels does help manage your diabetes and reduces the risk of having a large baby, but even than, sometimes babies grow larger than usual. Even in women who eat right, exercise, drink water, and test their glucose levels daily still end up giving birth to babies that are 9 or more pounds. When I had Gestational Diabetes, I was also 38 years old. My prenatal care was done at a high risk diabetic clinic. After my Gestational Diabetes diagnosis, at every prenatal visit I also saw the diabetes nurse. She would go over my glucose numbers and tweak my daily meal plan based on those numbers as well as my weight gain. For me, I had trouble gaining weight and it was common for the nurse to add extra food to my daily goals. If you have a nurse you see that helps you at your prenatal visits than this would be a good question to ask him/her. Or, you can ask your doctor if there are specific ways to reduce your risk of a larger baby. I have never heard of any specific techniques to reduce the risk, but it has always been my understanding that some babies are born large while others aren’t. Eating right and exercising along with monitoring your blood glucose numbers regulary are the main things when it comes to managing any form of diabetes. The side effects vary and I don’t believe there is any way to lessen the side effects.

  10. QUESTION:
    How often are women with gestational diabetes induced?
    I am 31 weeks pregnant and found out last week that I have gestational diabetes. It has popped up from no where as I am not in a high risk catergory except for the fact that my grandmother has low level type 2. Last week I was given a diet plan and have to test my blood sugar 4 times daily. My blood sugar levels have been fairly good (only highish twice) and I have been following my meal plan. However im still concerned about the risk factors (i.e. large baby, baby with hypoglycemia etc). I haven’t been for a scan since 20 weeks so I have no idea how big bub is and my midwife isn’t really giving much away as to whether I may need to be induced to lower the risk of a large baby. I am just wondering how many women have had to be induced or not due to gestational diabetes, and if their blood sugars where controlled or not.

    • ANSWER:
      I had gestaional diabetes with my first son. I had to control my diet, I didn’t have to use insulin. They diagnosed me at 28 weeks and I didn’t have any risk factors except that my grandma has type 2. They gave me an ultrasound at 37 weeks 6 days to measure how big he was. They estimated him to be 9 lbs 2 oz so they scheduled a c section for 3 days later because the doctor was worried about shoulder dystocia. He was born weighing 10 lbs 3 oz.

  11. QUESTION:
    gestational diabetes,do u have it?
    i was just diagnosed with gd but dont see the nutritionist until next week. i have a couple questions for those who have it or know A LOT about it. is it easy to control your blood sugar levels with diet,without having to use insulin? what kind of diet should i be on? do i have to eliminate ALL sugar such as yogurt,ice cream,smoothies,cake etc.? did your baby develop jaundice because of the diabetes?and lastly,did your diabetes go away after the birth? thanks for all questions answered =)

    • ANSWER:
      depending on hoe reactive your system is to sugars will make the differance – MOST GD is controlable with diet. breakfast was my most difficult to keep in range but i wasn’t overly nurotic about it as my best friend is diabetic and i know that even during pregnancy – not to let the Dr’s scare your too bad about “mild” overages …
      Try to find “Blue Bunny” yogurt products – they have a low carb line that is great – they have frozen yogurt bars and also a smoothie drink. Chicken, beef, fish ( mind what you eat due to mercery) and many fresh vegies are great for snacks. – ice cream & cake – umm not totally out of the question BUT… it will make your sugar go up – and leave very little for other carbs/sugars for that meal…
      Also stay away from aserpitame (sp?) not good for you or baby – the only artificial sweetner that is OK during pregnancy is Splenda. I OK’d it with my OBGYN and looke dit up on line too….

      As far as the baby – she was fine – 19 1/2 inches and 7lbs 4 oz. Delivered normally…. and even if your child did develop jayndice – they put them under special lights in the incubator and it works it’s self out.

      You will go back to not having diabetes as soon as you have the baby as the GD is a direct result of you being pregnant – How soon you ask – I asked the same question – Right away…

      With my breakfast #’s the endocrendonigist they had me seeing was pushing me towards insulen. I said no… but remember it was really only my breakfast #’s that went nuts. and they weren’t WAY OUT THERE…..

      Salads are great for you – and although i know the though of “rabbit food” might not tempt you remember grilled chicken or steak on top do wonders for a salad. Also it’s summer – and it’s all fresh
      Also it’s only for a few months at this point – so the grrrrr of it all will be worth it.
      Feel free to e-mail of you have any specific questions
      flirt762@yahoo.com – just be sure to list in the subject line ABOUT YOUR ANSWER IN QUESTIONS so i dont just delete it.

  12. QUESTION:
    What are normal Blood Sugar levels in 2 or 3 year old healthy kid.?
    Family history
    1) Mom was diagnosed with type 2 at 38 years and started on insulin at 49 years.
    2) Dad was daignosed with type 2 at 49/50 and went on insulin at 65.
    3) One brother (out of two) was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at 9 years.
    4) I had gestational diabetes in first pregnancy and was started on insulin from 12th week (started with 5 NPH). I had very good control during pregnancy though.
    Tested 7 times a day. Made drastic changes to my diet. Very few times my levels were above normal. Target was 130 after 1 hour. and less than 90 fasting. I was within range 90% of the time.

    My child’s readings.

    My kid is 2 1/2 year old now. Her 2 hour test was 115. Tested at home after dinner.

    Her Dinner was,

    1) White Rice cooked (2/3 cup)
    2) peas and paneer curry
    (Peas 2 about tsps,
    cheese half ounce,
    tamato + onion gravy 2tsp.)
    3) Plain yogurt 1/3 rd cup.
    4) Bite size snickers bar.

    She took her main meal in about 25 mins and ate her snickers 10 mins later.

    • ANSWER:
      Normal for anyone – kids or not is approximately 90-145. Anything over 200 and you can look at diabetes as something to be investigated.

      Having had gestational diabetes you do have a higher chance of developing T2 diabetes – exercising and watching what you eat can definitely make a HUGE difference.

      A non-diabetic will have almost no fluctuation with their eating – whereas a pre-diabetic can.

      In children that young – they will get Type 1 diabetes – or juvenille as some people call it.

      115 is just fine.

      Just look out for other symptoms. Excessing thirst, frequent urinating, lethargy without normal reasoning, sweet smelling breath.

      Check out websites such as www.diabetes-book.com and read up on it more.

      I am a type 2 diabetic diagnosed at age 39.

  13. QUESTION:
    Gestational Diabetes Question?
    Hello. At 20 weeks pregnant I have been tested early for GD and I do in fact have it. We tried controlling my blood glucose levels with diet & exercise, but my fasting blood sugar levels were still high, so I was put on 10 units of Insulin at night before I go to bed. Well after 3 nights and 3 mornings, my fasting blood sugar has been great (71-88). I am now finding though that my levels during the day are high. Why? I was doing really well during the day before the insulin. Now I’m afraid they’re going to make me take shots before every meal. Am I doing something to make my levels during the day high? I’m eating healthy. For example tonight I had grilled chicken, grilled asparagus & less than 1/2 cup of corn and my blood sugar was at 153 and hour later, wtf? I didn’t even have the amount of carbs I’m allowed to have. I’m feeling really frustrated and I can’t find any info on having to take shots before meals being pregnant so I’m hoping and praying someone out there can shine a light on this issue of mine. Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:

  14. QUESTION:
    At what point are blood sugar levels dangerous to my baby?
    Hi, I am about 4.5 weeks pregnant and have gestational diabetes. I had it with my last child, controlled it with diet and he is luckily fine. This time I am older and my fasting is often over 100 but not higher than 110. My after meal numbers are fine, usually in the 90′s.
    Any tips on how to get my fasting number lower? I am exercising, cut out sweets and balancing my carbs.
    Thank you!
    I go to the dr. next wednesday for my first check up. Is it ok to wait that long?
    Thank you everyone. I have not been re-tested for gestational diabetes but I know from my numbers that I have it again. I don’t have diabetes normally. My fasting was just 88 and 93 and I passed the glucose tolerance test as well. It stinks to have this the entire pregnancy but I will do whatever it takes to have a healthy baby.
    Thank you Doug. It’s frustrating because my a1c has been between 4.0 and 4.5. My fasting has been between 88 and 93 so I am not considered diabetic! I am overweight though-having children and no time to take care of myself has done that. I am going to take this weight off for good now so I don’t expect to ever be a full diabetic.

    • ANSWER:
      If you currently have “gestational diabetes” at 4.5 weeks, it’s more than gestational diabetes. It’s diabetes. Given that, in addition to an OB, you should be seeing an endocrinologist (diabetic specialist). While the “medical jury” is still out on this one and there are certainly varying opinions, gestational diabetes usually manifests after 13 weeks. Anything prior to that is regular diabetes and needs to very closely managed. Best wishes!

      Also, most docs will carefully watch blood sugars on patients that have had GD with a previous pregnancy and not wait until 28 weeks for labs.

  15. QUESTION:
    Why is my blood sugar so high?
    I am 39 weeks pregnant, diagnosed with gestational diabetes, and being induced on Friday. My blood sugar levels have been fine (controlled by diet, it hasn’t been high enough to require insulin). My fasting numbers are always between 75 and 95, and after meals they are typically below 110 – including meals that have a small amount of sugar.

    Yesterday, my between lunch and dinner snack was a muffin, and it had sugar in it. Then I had a completely sugar free dinner a few hours later. Two hours after my dinner, my blood sugar was 130. I assumed it was the muffin, so when I recorded it in my sheet for the diabetes clinic I made a note about the muffin so the nurse would know why it was high.

    Then today, I had NO SUGAR. At all. All day. My numbers were all good, until tonight. I just checked it (2 hours after dinner) and it’s 138.

    What in the world is going on??? I don’t understand how my numbers at night at high all of a sudden, especially after having no sugar!
    Wow, Pilot of the Storm. Thanks for that wonderful assessment.

    My baby is actually not going to die, he is quite healthy, and monitored twice a week via ultrasound and a fetal monitoring device.

    I am actually not fat, I have been unhealthily underweight my entire life regardless of diet and have a VERY hard time gaining weight.

    Not to mention that I do not have a problem “putting down the fork”, I actually have trouble finishing an entire meal due to my stomach being so small.

    Troll.

    • ANSWER:
      In pregnancy sugar can be high due to the effects of some hormones. How ever U will be normal after giving birth to the baby.

  16. QUESTION:
    Gestational diabetes?
    I am currently 34 week pregnant with gestational diabetes. I have question for the expecting mothers with gestational diabetes.
    If you were or are on dieat control instead of insulin, after how many hours do you check your sugar leveal, 1 or 2?
    How much sugar level is considered normal.
    How many times have your sugar levels shoot up and how much?
    How many ultrasounds have been performed or will be since the diagnosis of the diabetes?

    Have you find any thing in diet which seem to be helpful in controlling sugar levels?
    My doctor has taken just one ultasound at 32.4 week and second is scheduled at 37 week.
    I am doing 2 hour blood sugar test and there are times where my sigar has gone up to 145.
    I am talking about when one is diagnosed with gestational diabetes( i.s., you have failed one hour test, you have failed 3 hour test). and now doctor either wants you to control it with diet or with insulin. My doctor wants my level after each meal to be below 120 and fasting level should be below 105.

    • ANSWER:
      I did have gd and it was controlled by diet. I has to test 1 hour after meal, and be under 120. I had the normal amount of ultrasounds, the doctor just made sure to pay attention to the babies size because moms with gd somethimes have bigger babies, although my daughter was average size. Just try to cut out breads, pastas, sugars. Eat many small meals throughout the day, and drink lots of water. It is overwhelming at first to have to change everything you eat but hopefully you were eating healthy anyways. I did go over 120 a few times, not many. Really only when I cheated on my diet. Hope this helps! Good Luck on the diet!

  17. QUESTION:
    Question about gestational diabetes?
    I have gestational diabetes and I am wondering if I will really seriously have to continue checking my blood sugar levels 4 times a day up until I give birth. I’ve been recording my blood sugar levels in a workbook the nurse/dietitian gave me. I think I am controlling it a lot better. Today for example my readings were this:

    90=when I woke up
    91=two hours after breakfast
    87=two hours after lunch

    I am just wondering that if it shows that I’m improving my levels, do you think they will possibly let me decrease my checks from 4 to maybe 3 a day or so?

    • ANSWER:
      Since we have no baseline, we can only assume that your numbers were higher before today. Secondly, we have no idea what you are doing for treatment.

      Here’s my opinion… unless or until you know whether it’s a diet issue, a lack of exercise issue, or a combination… it’s better to err on the side of caution. This is not something you master in a few days. Until you find a diet and exercise combo that gives you consistent numbers, I would continue as prescribed.

      If you adopt the Fuhrman diet and walk a half hour a day, you should become stable enough to check only once in the morning (my opinion) in under two weeks. The key is consistency. I eat almost the same thing each day and exercise about the same each day. I rarely check my blood sugar anymore.

  18. QUESTION:
    Gestational Diabetes?
    i will be eight months pregnant this friday and everything is going perfectly fine, except for my gestational diabetes. i can’t keep it controlled to save my life, and it’s not like i’m not trying. i went for my first visit with the diabetes dietician, which was just a meeting to explain gestional diabetes, precautionary measures, etc. i go for my second meeting with the actual nutritionist monday to determine whether or not diet alone is controlling it, or if i need to be put on insulin, which obviously i will have to be. i’ve been following the sheet that the dietician gave with the the food “do’s and don’ts” and i also cut out all sweets and drink only water, with that being said, my blood sugar levels remain high. i have to check my sugar four times a day…in the morning before i eat anything, and then after every meal. i eat my snacks in between meals as well, as i am supposed to. my sugar seems to be fine when i test it first thing in the morning, it’s supposed to be between 60-95, and mine normally runs 70-100. but, for some reason after that, it goes up and stays up. if i check it one hour after i eat, it’s supposed <140 and if i wait two hours, it's supposed to be <120, well after two hours mine stays between 135-150. Saturday, it even went as high as 215, and it steadily went down after it spiked. beings that it was so high, i called the dr on call and was told that they would call me back shortly. well, that was a 4:30pm on Saturday...and at 10:30am Monday morning, they have yet to call me back...i thought this was a serious matter, but obviously i was wrong. i know i won't know exactly what to do as far as controlling it until i go and see the nutritionist, but i was just curious as to if anybody else had had this problem and could give me a little advice/peace of mind until i go. thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      Hiya,
      I’m currently 35 weeks with my second child and have been diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes too. I expected to have it this time, as I had it when I was expecting my son in 2009. I’m having so much trouble keeping my sugar levels normal as well. The diet doesn’t seem to keep it down, yet sometimes it just drops for no reason! My dietitian has given me Metformin to make my body more sensitive to my natural insulin – however I don’t think it’s working. I keep going lightheaded and dizzy, and I’m always hungry because the diet just simply isn’t enough. I’m hoping they may induce me at 36-37 weeks, as I’m so uncomfortable anyway and my baby is getting rather chunky!

      I wouldn’t worry too much about them not calling you back, GD isn’t generally too serious, except that your baby could be getting a rounded tummy! As long as you feel ‘generally’ ok in yourself, and you can still feel baby moving plenty, just continue doing the finger pricks as requested. At least you tried to call them, so you made an effort and did the right thing by trying to inform them! :-)

      Good luck and I hope everything goes well with the rest of your pregnancy and birth!

      xxxxx

  19. QUESTION:
    What does it mean? (Gestational Diabetes)?
    What does it mean if I test my blood sugars after dinner and their either normal or high, I go to bed, and then when I wake up in the morning my fasting sugar levels are still high? I feel like I can’t win here. I was diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes last week and they measure my baby while I was 27 weeks and my baby measure 31 weeks! I know I need to get this sugar thing under control but alot of times when I think I’m eating just right I end up too high or low, Its extremely difficult to get this in the in between. Anyone been in this situation have any advice? I’m trying so hard and am tired of the headaches I get. Please no rude comments.
    aww thanks so much for the help and the support! My son was born at 38 weeks and was 9.5lbs without diabetes. With him I was glucose intolerant not diabetic. As big this baby is already measuring I know I’m in for it! I do see a nutritionist and I have an appt on Thursday.

    • ANSWER:
      I feel your pain – my daughter is 3 months old, but when I was pregnant with her, I was told I had GD at my 28 week checkup…let’s just say it is very hard to keep it under control – did they have you talk to a dietary specialist in diabetes? Mine was so out of control they had to put me on insulin – ultrasounds every 3 weeks – and had to do a c-section at 39 weeks…at my 38th week ultrasound (exactly 1 week before my c-section), they estimated her weight at 9lbs – I ended up having an 11lb 3.2oz baby – yep, sure did LOL….It still shocks me :)

      Your fasting lvls in the morning before breakfast are suposed to be below 100 – if they are above, it means you’re intakes at night are too much – and you need to make sure you’re not eating nor drinking any carbohydrates after 7-8pm…anything after that would make your fasting lvls high in the morning…

      Keep your head up, doctors are there to answer any questions you have, don’t be afraid to utilize their time, that’s what they get paid for :) God Bless!!

  20. QUESTION:
    A few questions about Gestational Diabetes?
    Hi all i have just found out that i have tested positive for gestational diabetes, i am currently 29 weeks pregnant with my second baby in the UK, My first baby was 10 lbs without the condition so this is an issue for me.
    I am going to see a consultant and dietitian about this in a few days, i was just wanting a bit of general information from other women who have/had the condition.

    What happens next, do i get a blood monitor kit to control my sugars if so what is the correct blood sugar level to be maintained? and how is that controlled?

    Did you have a larger baby, if so what weight and what kind of delivery was it? When were you offered growth scans and what was that like?

    Thanks all
    Liz

    • ANSWER:
      I am also 29 weeks pregnant, but this is my first. I already had the consultant/dietitian appointment. They did give me a monitor to check my blood sugar levels 4 times a day. I was told levels should be below 90 first thing in the morning and below 120 2 hours after each meal. Although I have not succeeded in keeping mine below that. They told me the way to control it with a diet the best you can is my counting Total Grams of Carbohydrates in each meal.
      30g of carbs for breakfast
      15-30 g of carbs for snack
      45-60g of carbs for lunch
      15-30g of carbs for snack
      45-60g of carbs for dinner
      15-30g of carbs for bedtime snack

      Hope this helps. When I saw my doctor after the appointment with the dietitian, he said there is not much you can do to control it completely. I was put on a half a pill to help control it, and that dosage will go up as the pregnancy progresses. Good Luck!!

  21. QUESTION:
    I’m pregnant & have Gestational Diabetes that I’m trying to control by diet and exercise,?
    ,does a slight rise in my blood sugar levels while I’m sleeping harmful to my baby?

    • ANSWER:
      I suppose that depends on what you mean by a ‘slight rise.’ Your doctor probably gave you blood sugar guidelines – where you should be after and between meals, as well as in the morning.

      If you’re experiencing elevated morning blood sugar, then you are likely dealing with Dawn Phenomenon. Perhaps you’ve noticed that your blood sugar begins rising after 3 AM or so. One thing you can do is eat something small before bed or at 3 AM, which will (hopefully) shut the liver off enough so that it’s not pumping out lots of glucose in preparation for the waking hours.

  22. QUESTION:
    cant control bloog sugar levles?
    im 36 weeks pregnant with gestational diabetes. its so hard to control my blood sugar levels. If i eat 2 wheat bread my sugar levels will go up to 160. Will i have to deliver early if this goes on? Also i barely felt my baby move all day

    • ANSWER:
      Ask your doctor if insulin injection would help.

  23. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had elevated Blood Sugar level for the first Glucose test but then ended up not having …..?
    Gestational Diabetes??? Please only answer this if you have had experience with this. I don’t want to hear that I need to see a Dr. BECAUSE I already have, I am just a little anxious about what I am going to find out on Monday. SO I would love to hear your stories…as long as they aren’t going to freak me out too much!! LOL

    I have already taken an early OSS(glucose tolerance test) last WED> and my Glucose was elevated. So I have to take the full 3 hour test on Monday. I do have a family history of Diabetes Type 1 and Type2.. and I have had Low blood sugar in the past but now it is High.
    I realize that Most women can control their GD with diet and exercise…but My Aunt had it and we almost lost her and the baby… So I am just a little scared.
    Thanks for sharing your experiences…
    THANKS LADIES!!! I already feel much better.
    Yeah For the first test I didn’t eat anything after Midnight the night before..and I didn’t eat or drink anything before I drank the Glucola, even though they said I could . And it was still elevated. They didn’t tell me what it actually was, just that it was elelvated.
    But you all have made me feel tons better… just knowing there are so many of you that ended up NOT having Gestational D. Anyway, again THANKS SO MUCH!!

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you’re pretty nervous about this! I can only speak from personal experience, but I hope this helps. My one hour test was elevated, so I went back for the three hour test. I was very close to meeting the criteria for gestational diabetes, but luckily, my levels were considered in the normal range by a point or two. Still, my doctor recommended I keep an eye on my diet, which I tried to do. The worst part of the whole experience was the waiting around for three hours and being hungry when it was done. I’m not sure how it will be for you, but I did not get my results the same day. I don’t remember how long it took.

      I was lucky. And in the end, I was rewarded with a beautiful baby boy! I hope your three hour test goes well. And if you do have GD, I have hope that you’ll be able to manage it well. Good luck to you! Take a deep breath and try not to worry.

  24. QUESTION:
    My blood glucose reader gives me different readings?
    I was just diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes and I have to prick my finger 4 times a day to be sure my sugar levels are normal and controlled.
    And yesterday I pricked myself and it read 97 i decided to double check and i wiped my finger off with a alcohol wipe and squeezed where the prick was and then it said 107?
    is this normal for the gluclose reader to be doing? is there really a difference in that first drop of blood? and witch answer would i go by?

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, my friend, the most likely reason you received a different test result is because you wiped your finger with an alcohol wipe and didn’t allow enough time for the alcohol to evaporate.

      Assuming you either washed and dried your hands immediately prior to your first blood test, OR you wiped your finger with an alcohol swab/wipe AND allowed it sufficient time for the alcohol to evaporate, I’d take the first reading as the more accurate one.

      Home blood glucose meters do have a margin of error to which they must comply before being allowed to be sold. This must be within 10 to 15% of the result obtained from a testing laboratory. i.e. if the laboratory were to test your blood sugar (glucose) level and found it to be 150 mg/dL, a home meter could give a result from between 127.5 mg/dL and 172.5 mg/dL and still be considered accurate. We must assume that your particular meter has been correctly calibrated before being sold. (Manufacturers do offer test solutions which allow meters to be recalibrated, but these solutions are specific to individual brands of blood glucose meter.)

  25. QUESTION:
    2 Hours Glucose Test Results, Borderline Gestational Diabetes?
    Hey Guys,

    I just came back from my OB appointment and they informed me of my 2 hours glucose tolerance test which I had to do since I failed my 1 hour glucose tolerance test.

    2 of them (the fasting one, and the one after 2 hours) are normal, but the one after 1 hour was 10.8 and it should be 10.6! =S they said its borderline GD and has referred me to the nutritionist!

    I do not understand…. is it really that bad =|

    I read on internet that in America where they have 3 hours test (4 blood samples) if 2 of them come back normal (50%) they say you passed!! My 2 out of 3 were normal =O

    I’m feeling very upset…. though the doctor said, it can be controlled through diet since the result is not very high, and no medicine would be needed, I still would need to monitor my sugar levels numerous times a day =( really scared since I’m a HUGE needle phobic! Not looking forward to that part…

    Any similar experiences, advise? what do you guys think?

    I’m currently in my 30th week and have gained 11 pounds so far, and I exercise around 50 minutes on treadmill, 5 times a week!

    • ANSWER:
      First, borderline is NOT as bad as it sounds, so calm down! I know it is very scary to be told something like that. Remember, too, that just because you happened to have one bad test does not mean that you are like that all the time. Everybody can have a fluke once in a while. I had one bad test and told them I was not going to go through the 3-hour test but they could prick my finger and take my blood as much as they wished. And it was never high again, never even close to borderline again, actually.

      From your exercise and weight gain, it sounds like you are doing great. Most likely, you’ll just need to cut out sweets and that will be plenty.

  26. QUESTION:
    Babies born with low blood sugar?
    I am 38 weeks and 1 day pregnant. I am having a scheduled c section on september 2nd due to the fact that my daughter is breech and is expected to weigh 9 lbs. I do have gestational diabetes. I’m a bit worried about her having low blood sugar after birth. My diabetes is diet controlled, but there have been times where my levels have been a bit high. They’ve been running in the 120s to 130s today, which isn’t horrible, but I’m not to exceed 120. Will this cause her to have low blood sugar at birth? How easily is it brought back up and managed? Does that always work? The rest of the week I will make sure my levels are staying down until I have her on Friday. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  27. QUESTION:
    Gestational Diabetes question….?
    About a month ago my doctor diagnosed me with gestational diabetes. Since then I went to a nutritionist and was put on a carb-counting diet, as well as started an exercise regimen of at least 30 min walking 3x a week, usually 20min of exercise of some sort every day (some days we walk to the stores which is a 90min walk. Also, keep in mind that the walks I’m talking about my sister terms as hikes because the grades of the hills up and down tend to be 5%-15%, so it’s not easy going.) I’ve apparently gotten my blood numbers under control, except my morning fasting number.

    Today, I was feeling a bit sick so I took my blood sugar at 1hr instead of at 2hr and was horrified to find it about 170. At 2 hr it was 109, so it’s fine… but it worries me that it spikes like that. And then the morning fast number again is a fail at 98. The doctor seems unconcerned, since he’s watching for anything above 105 for fasting number and since my 2 hour after breakfast is consistently under control no matter if I exercise or not. But I don’t trust him.

    My nutritionist seems to believe I should be retested for diabetes because she thinks I’m having hypoglycemic reactions and he flubbed the test the first time (didn’t carbo load 3 days beforehand as well as didn’t do it at a good time for me and my body cycle.) My fasting, 1st and 2nd numbers were failing in the glucose 3 hour challenge, my 3rd number was hypoglycemic (close to 70.) She said she thinks that I had a delayed reaction because of the hour the test was at, and then had a spike in insulin high enough that I went hypoglycemic on my own, and doesn’t feel like insulin would be a good idea in my case because of that. But it worries me that for that hour after I get up my insulin response is ‘sluggish’. I’ve opted for the ‘better safe than sorry’ route.

    Has anyone had any similar experiences? Does anyone have any hints on how to bring my fasting down better? My night-time snack usually is carrots, dip, and then maybe a yogurt or something that has the 2 carbs I need. I’ve had people recommend replacing the carrots with celery+peanut butter, since the protein may help. Is that a good idea?

    Doc seems to believe baby is not getting too big anymore since the diet and seems very pleased with how my weight has leveled off and blood sugars are under control.

    • ANSWER:
      try eating a protein as a snack like crackers and cheese or peanut butter on whole wheat toast it usually helps bring my sugar down when I get a craving for something sweet Ill eat it but then I eat a piece of cheese to bring it down good luck. Also my fasting sugars are usually higher then my sugars through out the day I take insulin 3 times a day but I sometimes only take it 2 bc I checked my sugar and it was below 70 Im afraid it might get to low at night.

  28. QUESTION:
    Do think it is even worth going to a dietician for gestational diabetes at this point in my pregnancy?
    I am currently 37 weeks pregnant. I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 33 weeks. I have since learned to manage my own diet from help on the Internet and have also learned how to take my own blood sugar and have been sending my levels to the doctor twice a week. My blood sugars have been great and i haven’t had a hard time keeping them under control. That being said I have been trying to get an appt with a dietitian since I found out and I could not get an appt till tomm. I’m already 2cm dilated and having alot of pressure and contractions. Inhave to drive myself to the place tomm which is not that close to where I live. I am jus wondering if you think it is even worth it at this point? I am feeling very uncomfortable and really just want to stay home and relax but feel guilty. What do you think?

    • ANSWER:

  29. QUESTION:
    36 wks with Gestational Diabetes…insulin fears?
    Hi, I am almost 36 wks pregnant with gestational diabetes. Once I was diagnosed, I was able to quickly work my diet to get my blood sugars at the proper level, so I would not need insulin. A few weeks ago, I started getting highs after my breakfast test (with even one serving of carbs). So I started eliminating carbs from breakfast. I usually have a protein shake with soymilk for breakfast and a few pieces of turkey sausage, and then after my morning bg test I will have a piece of peanut butter toast or fruit. My question is, now my lunch numbers are becoming more sensitive and if I have my max carbs (which my dietician said was ok since I was carb-free for breakfast), my bg levels are over, usually in the 140′s. My dietician now wants me to go on insulin. My doc has seen my bg readings for the last 2 weeks and didn’t seem so concerned. I would love to get through these last few weeks (I only have three because I am having a scheduled cesarean at 39wks) without having to prod myself further and give a shot every morning. What should I do? As of now, I am waiting to see my doc next week before making a final decision. I don’t really want to give myself a shot every day, but of course, baby comes first and I want to do what is best. I have not gained very much weight this pregnancy, but my baby is gaining and measuring average. Any expert advice? Go for the insulin or try to control more carbs? I don’t want to be on the Atkins diet while prego, that can’t be good for baby. Thanks:)

    • ANSWER:
      Just go on the insulin. It makes control much easier and will take some of the stress off of you. It is for your good health as well as the babies. I went on insulin and wish I had done it a lot sooner, because now I have good BS levels almost all of the time. You should also know that 65% of women that have had gestational diabetes end up developing type 2 later in life. So keep an eye on things even after you have the baby.

  30. QUESTION:
    High blood sugar readings?
    I have gestational diabetes and im 35 wks pregnant today. I have been following a diet plan since 28 wks and up until 2 wks ago my blood sugar was doing really well. I’m still following my diet but my levels are high almost every time i check them. such as today i had my normal breakfast, 3/4 cup cereal(no sugar just plain cereal) and 1 cup milk. 1 hour after i ate my BS was 144. a few weeks ago after the same meal it would have only been about 112. I have not done my 2 hour check yet. As of yet I am not on any insulin or medication for the diabetes. I’m just wondering if this is normal to go from having my diabetes under control to everything being messed up without a change in my diet.

    • ANSWER:
      the farther along you get, the more insulin your body needs since you develop a resistance during pregnancy. just let your doc know they may just put you on a pill, which is something that most women with gestational have to do that far along, but 144 an hour after you ate is not going to hurt your baby — it’s still considered a very normal number. and going from everything under control to completely messed up is normal too lol i’m a diabetic and 30 weeks pregnant and they’ve had to change my insulin levels ALL throughout my pregnancy. it’s not anything you’re doing wrong its just your body changing with how big you’ve gotten and its normal, i’d just recommend letting your doc know

  31. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had the Gestational Diabetes test in the first trimester?
    I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes during my first pregnancy. It was easily controlled with diet (I actually never had high blood sugars in all the time I was testing). Due to that diagnosis, it is requested that I take the test during the first trimester of my current second pregnancy. I am wondering if my glucose readings are abnormal this time around in the one hour test if I will be required to take the 3 hour challenge test, or if “failing” one will be sufficient for a diagnosis. I don’t mind regularly checking my blood glucose levels, but I’d like to not sit through the three hour test since it does make me queasy and ill. Since they know I have a history of this, might they let me off at the first test if it comes back abnormal?

    • ANSWER:
      They usually try to have you just do the 3-hour in the first trimester if you’re at a high risk of gestational diabetes. If they ask you to do a 1-hour, and you fail, then they will make you do a 3-hour, generally. But, it’s probably just easier to do a 3-hour if you are at higher risk. If I were you, I’d ask to just do a 3-hour without bothering with the 1-hour. That’s what I did!

  32. QUESTION:
    Questions on Gestational Diabetes?
    I am 32 weeks and found out I had GD at 29 weeks. I’ve been controlling it through diet and exercise so far. I am scheduled for an Ultrasound on Friday to check the baby’s size, although I see I shouldn’t get to concerned with what that says since it looks like the accuracy isn’t very good this far along.

    I check my levels 4 times a day.

    My fasting (which is supposed to be between 70-90) is pretty consistently 100-117 (average so far is 105 even though I’ve had a few in the low 90’s, but never below 90).

    My after breakfast (which is supposed to be between 70-120) is almost always between 100-120 (average so far is 107).

    My after lunch (should be between 70-120) is usually OK and has been better lately. It’s average so far is 122.

    My after dinner (should be between 70-120) is usually OK too and has also been better lately. I’m averaging 119 for it.

    I’ve never had a fasting above 117 or a 2 hour after meals over 147.

    How does this compare to your levels? I’m sticking to the diet exactly and am exercising as much as possible.

    Also, my doctor has talked about maybe starting me on oral meds (before going to insulin) if my fasting numbers don’t get more control. If you were put on medication, at what point and did it help?

    I’m also interested in when you delivered and how much your baby weighed? Were you induced or when went into labor on your own? How many weeks were you then? Did you have the baby vaginally or by c-section? How much did your baby weigh and did that vary from the ultrasound estimate if one was done? Did the baby have low blood sugar or have to go into NICU after birth?

    Thanks for sharing your experience. You see so many questions here from pregnant mothers w/ GD, but not so many that check in after the birth to tell how everything went.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I myself do not have gestational diabetes ( I’m 36 weeks with baby no2) but my partners aunt is controlling her gestational diabetes with insulin ( she’s just found out she has diabetes and the doctors need to control things quicker now rather than later)

      She is having fortnightly growth scans to see how the baby is getting on. Although I don’t agree with this as it can scare mothers into thinking they’re having a large baby. Growth scans can have a margin of error by as much as 1lb! and in baby weight, it makes all the difference. Your obstetrician will know by the time you reach 36 weeks if you’ll need a c-section or induce you, as they don’t like to run the risk of the baby being too big.
      My mother had G/B with my sister and me and my sister was delivered 10 days early at 9lbs 3oz I was delivered by c-section 3 years later 1 week early at 10lbs 8oz… please bear in mind though, it was my mothers 3rd and 4th pregnancy.

      But, if you’re controlling your diabetes by diet, then you could end up having a normal sized baby for a woman with G/B. I’ve heard of women who control their G/B with diet alone and have had a 8lb baby. I think you are getting yourself worked up too much. Your doctor/midwife and obstetrician will not let you get so big that you can’t have your baby naturally ( unless you don’t want to)

      Also, usually a big baby will still not be delivered ( even by c-section) until at least 37 weeks unless your health is at risk.

  33. QUESTION:
    35 weeks and gestational diabetes?
    I’m 35 weeks and 4 days pregnant. I was diagnosed with GD around my 26th week. My blood sugars are normally very good and diet controlled. I just ate a frozen shrimp fried rice meal that I thought was only 30ish grams of carbs, but come to find out there were two servings in the container and I ate the whole thing. I just tested my sugar 2 hours after eating, and its 110 which is very good. I’m to keep my levels under 120. I think you’re only supposed to eat around 45 carbs per meal. But since I ate a bit more than that (on accident) and my blood sugars came out normal, is that ok? Did it just not affect me? If I can eat things that there is a better alternative for but I can still keep my sugars under control when I do eat them, is it ok to eat it?

    • ANSWER:
      Really its not about the carb balancing its good carbs vs bad and how your body handles them. Was your rice white or brown? Brown won’t affect your levels the same as white does. Sounds to me like you are watching what you are eating and doing good, its not the occasional over load that hurts you it is the whole lifestyle.

  34. QUESTION:
    Gestational diabetes, no test strips, diet?
    I’m having problems with my insurance company not covering my test strips. They said they can only cover a certain amount a month so I cannot get any more for 2 and a half weeks. I see the doctor again 6 days before I can get a re-fill. I know the doctor is going to be mad. I cannot measure my blood glucose if I don’t have strips! I have argued with them and I have spoken to a nurse at my doctor’s office and she told me just to follow the diet and go and buy some test strips. Sorry, lady, they are 0 a box and I cannot afford that! I need an oil delivery at my house! Anyway, how would you know if your blood sugar is too high or too low? I’ve been keeping it well under control, but now that I have no test strips I cannot monitor my levels. Has anything like this ever happened to anyone on here? What did you do? I’m worried the doctor will put me on insulin or something just because he cannot monitor my levels and there is nothing I can really do about it! I haven’t needed insulin at all, and I don’t think I will, but what can I do? Also, did any of you have to change your diets at all as pregnancy progresses? I’m 33 weeks now, and I’ve been on this GD diet for close to four weeks and my levels have been generally in the same area, and I always keep to my diet. Could the diet change? Like, say you can have up to 45g of carbs for all three meals which I do, but then at say week 35, could this change to where you can only have 30? That 45 is too much? I can’t explain what I mean, hopefully someone can understand my rambling! Haha. Thanks in advance if you can answer!!
    I do stay on top of it, I eat exactly as the diet tells me to and I follow it all perfectly. I cannot afford them, regardless of the reason. Nobody can, diabetes is highway robbery.
    I’m looking into the ReliOn right now, thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I didn’t have GD, but I still had to go on a low carb diet because I somewhat failed the second test. (you know how they draw your blood 4 times, well, my blood sugar came back a little bit high on one of the blood tests) Your diet will remain the same for the remainder of your pregnancy. I am sure if you stick to your diet, everything will be fine.

      One thing though is that when you start early labor, screw that diet! You need those carbs for energy. I stuck to the diet and the nurses had my husband buy powerade for me to drink because they said I needed the carbs.

  35. QUESTION:
    Ladies who had Gestational Diabetes? ?
    I haven’t had an u/s (to determine size) yet, and don’t think I will have one. They aren’t always accurate anyway. My sugars have been fine, controlled with diet, but creeping up just a little. (Not too high, just higher than my normal levels) ..

    Anyway, my questions are –
    Were you induced? When?
    Did you ASK to be induced or did they recommend it?
    Was your baby healthy?
    What happened with the baby’s blood sugar & also your blood sugar?
    Did you end up in a c-section?

    I spoke with a nurse today who said that at my office if you have GD you are usually induced at 39 weeks which is fine with me as I want to avoid a c-section at all costs and do not want a huge baby. I know that if you keep your sugars under control your chances of having a large baby are slim, but a lot can happen in that last week, such as the placenta deteriorating, etc. She asked if I had an appointment coming up, which I do on Monday (tomorrow I have an NST but I won’t see the doctor) .. and she said at my appointment to talk to the doctor about it and set it up. I guess that would mean they do, so I guess I’ll find out Monday.
    Also, how do you ask to be induced? Just in case the nurse wasn’t 100% accurate. (although I do think she was, I mean, why else would she say that, right? Then again, she isn’t the doctor..)

    I want to know how to bring it up at the appointment, I’m scared to even ask! Haha. He said anytime is fine for the baby to come now, but didn’t mention an induction, however I heard a girl in the waiting room who is 10 days ahead of me and is being induced at 39 weeks. I can’t think of what to say or how to approach it.

    • ANSWER:
      Just ask the OB if he/she induces gestational diabetics or at what point would they think about inducing. I really think if the OB was planning to induce you at 39 weeks it would have been mentioned already! I’ve been having conversations with my OB about this all throughout the pregnancy, but definitely we have discussed it more than once since week 34 or so.

      Were you induced? When? > In my first pregnancy, my OB said if I went past my due date it was time to induce. I was in early labor for about a week and went in on the day after my due date. I was already at 4 cm but officially I was there to be induced. I did get pitocin for about an hour but then they cut it off as it was doing too much. It brings on HARD contractions.

      Did you ASK to be induced or did they recommend it? > My previous doctor pretty much insisted on induction if I went past my due date. My current OB says if I have no progress by week 39 she will try the gel on my cervix. I’m not sure we’ll get to having to use pitocin but I wouldn’t want it until I’m overdue.

      Was your baby healthy? > Yup! 7 1/2 pounds, totally healthy. She’s now 8 years old and a competitive figure skater.

      What happened with the baby’s blood sugar & also your blood sugar?> Baby’s blood sugar was completely normal at birth and never dropped or raised in the hospital. My blood sugar got a lot better but since I’m a diabetic all the time it doesn’t go away like it does for GD’s.

      Did you end up in a c-section? > Nope. My scans said she would be over 9 pounds but my OB could look at my belly and tell me there was no way the baby was that big. They’re not always accurate.

  36. QUESTION:
    Poll for moms who had gestational diabetes?
    1.) How did you control your GDM while you were pregnant (strictly diet, diet and insulin pill, or insulin shot)
    2.) How many prenatal visits per week did you have to go to to check on your baby
    3.) How many weeks ahead was you baby measuring when you found out you had GDM
    4.) Did you doctor induce you before your due date and if so how many weeks before your due date. If not did they let you go the full 40 weeks?
    5.) Did you have a natural birth or a c-section
    6.) How big was your baby when he/she was born
    7.) Did your baby have any complications after delivery (jaundice, hypoglycemia, ect)

    When I found out I had GDM at 27 weeks my son was measuring 2 weeks ahead and by 34 weeks he was measuring full term at about 7.5lbs
    I controlled my GDM with diet at first but I lost 10lbs and my doctor was concerned so he told me to eat normal and gave me the glyburide insulin pill. I still continued to cut all sugary products from my diet.
    My doctor originally planned to induce me at 39 weeks but my son decided to come at 38 weeks instead and I had to have a c-section becuase he was breached
    When my son was born he weighed 8lbs and 3oz and 19 inches long. My doctor said had I gone all 40 weeks my son probably would have weighed 10lbs
    My son was also born with hypoglycemia a.k.a low blood sugar so he had to be feed every hour right after birth to bring his levels up but he was okay after that.

    Please share with me your stories. Thanks. ;-)
    Doodlestuff, I didn’t ask for your opinion. I asked for facts about your birthing experience and pregnancy with GDM, not preexisting diabetes. Since you haven’t even had your baby yet this pool doesn’t pertain to you. I honestly didn’t want to here your little rant about what a bad doctor I had so keep it to yourself next time. k.

    • ANSWER:
      Strict diet
      I had to go once a week from 28 weeks on
      3-4 weeks
      Scheduled c section at 38 weeks because the baby was too large
      c section
      10 lbs 3 oz and 22 inches long
      Fluid in lungs

  37. QUESTION:
    Please answer if you know about gestational diabetes UK?
    I have been diabetic my whole life and have managed to keep good blood glucose levels with diet and metphormin.

    I am now just over 5 months pregnant and have been on insulin since about week 8 of my pregnancy. I was speaking to a friend today who is type 2 diabetic and just had a baby who also went on insulin during her pregnancy.

    She was shocked to learn that my insulin dosage with meals is about 40 units (she was only on 12units with meals by the time she gave birth)

    I guess my question is IS 40 units an abnormally high dosage for 5 months pregnant? I was told by my doctor that my dosage would go up and up throughout the pregnancy, I control my own dosage but he didn’t clarify whether I am on track and I haven’t see him for a month and don’t have an appointment for another 2 weeks.

    I have also been having hypos the last 2 weeks. Could this be related to my high dosage of insulin? My readings an hour after my meals are normally between 6.5 and 8.0 but sometimes within 2 or 3 hours I will drop as low as 2.1.

    I don’t eat extra large portions and have not gained much weight with the pregnancy. I try to stick to brown bread and don’t eat sugary things. I eat plenty of veg and try to have 1 or two portions of fruit (usually bananas or apples) everyday. If the pregnancy cravings are driving me insane I have a packet of crisps, diet coke or toast with low sugar jam. I do occasionally have more than two portions of fruit if I have a hypo.

    Is there any other pregnant diabetic out there with a similar experience or concerns? I feel a little worried my dosage is so drastically higher than my friends was when she was so much further along. Should I be aiming for a lower dosage?

    Also if this matters, my nighttime dosage is much lower at 14 units. Sometimes I have a hypo in the middle of the night and keep chocolate by my bed for when this happens.

    • ANSWER:
      It doesn’t matter what anyone else’s requirements are.
      It is YOUR body. Not theirs.
      If you are having hypos, you need to cut back though.
      You need to see your doctor or diabetes nurse as low sugars are dangerous for the baby’s development (high sugars also affect the baby).
      Satisfying the odd craving is ok too as long as your sugars don’t go too high.
      Be careful with the caffeine in the diet coke. It will stimulate the baby.
      Good luck

  38. QUESTION:
    how necessary is glucose testing during pregnancy?
    I have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) naturally. This is my second pregnancy. During my first pregnancy I also had gestational diabetes (high blood sugar). My baby doctor told me I had to go for glucose testing and said I had no choice. The reason I dont want to go is, the sugar drink made me very sick when I took it during my first pregnancy. When I was diagnosed with Gestational diabetes, all they did was send me to a diet class and give me another sugar blood tester which I already have. I do not at all believe I have gestational diabetes, I would know if my sugar levels were as out of control as they were when I had it during my first pregnancy. Even if i had it, I know how to eat, Im already diabetic. Is it really necessary to get tested? They give me the sugar drink, make me sit in the waiting room for hours, as I feel like im going to pass out, then they take my blood. Whats the point? My nurse yelled at me today and told me I need to get it done. Is it really necessary?
    no prescription needed for test strips or blood glucose supplies, i buy them at the drug store
    Neato, that is good to know but I am against inductions. I had a terrible time when I neared my due date with my son.My doctors were trying to force an induction on me, but I refused it. He came out 2 weeks late naturally, they checked the placenta and it was great. ty tho.

    • ANSWER:
      First you say that you have hypoglycemia the you state you have diabetes .This is confusing.
      First figure out what you have and make sure to do everything you have to for your own sake and your baby’s life.

      If you have a prescription for testing strips your insurance can pay for them and you don’t have to pay out of pocket.

  39. QUESTION:
    I need help with this diabetes assignment my teacher has given me?
    Read the case study and answer the questions that follow:
    Debra is a 45 year old woman of Pacific Islander descent who has been living with diabetes for 5 years. She has come in for a check-up. She has always considered herself to be overweight, and does not take part in regular physical activity. Debra does not take insulin to control her diabetes, but does have to take oral medications to help her cells become more receptive to her own insulin. Her lab tests show the following: HbA1c 8.3%, serum cholesterol 214 mg/dl, and triglycerides 275 mg/dl.

    When Debra was diagnosed with diabetes she did not seek the help and expertise of a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). Instead she followed the diet advice of her great aunt who also has diabetes, which was simply to avoid anything with sugar. This guideline, though simple, has not been working well for Debra and her sweet tooth.

    Questions: (All answers can be found in the notes)
    1.Interpret the results of Debra’s lab tests.
    a.Are they within normal limits? Explain. (1 point)
    b.If not, what are the normal levels of those particular lab tests? (1 point)
    c.We know that Debra has already been diagnosed with diabetes, but her lab results indicate that she is at risk for another disease/condition. What is she at risk for and why? (2 points)

    2.Based on the information provided in the case study, what type of diabetes does Debra likely have? What have you based your answer on? (2 points)

    3.During the Diabetes lecture, we discussed diet changes that can be beneficial in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. What are these diet changes? (2 points)

    4.Which of the risk factors (not the same as complications) for diabetes discussed in class (in the notes) apply to Debra? (1 points)

    5.Explain briefly the functions of insulin and glucagon, respectively, with regard to blood glucose control. (2 points)

    6.Explain the major difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. (1 point)

    7.Briefly explain the following terms: Glycogenesis, Glycogenolysis, Gestational diabetes, Polyphagia, Insulin resistance, Hypoglycemia, Glycated hemoglobin, Glucometer. (8 points)

    • ANSWER:
      I think it would be better if you did your own homework. Go to webmd and research your project.

  40. QUESTION:
    what is a proper blood glucose level for insulin resistant people?
    My Dr diagnosed me with it and told me to keep my sugars under control with diet and exercise and Glucophage. But he failed to tell me how often i should be testing and what the normal level is. I remember when i was pregnant it was 120 but is that only for gestational diabetes or all diabetics? HELP.

    • ANSWER:
      you should try to get as near 100 as possible!! Any reading over 125 is damaging to eyes and nerves.

      You should be checking fasting – when you wake up, and randomly during the day.

      Journal everything!! a steno pad works well for journaling. Put down your readings, your foods, your exercise and for a while when you’re sleeping! It will give you a clue as to what foods you really don’t want in your food plan, no matter what the dietician or CDE suggests for you to eat.

      Yep, your doc patted you on your butt and said watch the sugars!! they do that!! Dumb doctors!!! they can’t explain so they avoid.

      did he give you reference to dietician? to CDE? to Endo? give you Rx for meter and strips?

      did he tell you that glucophage/metformin works best if taken at the beginning of a meal?

  41. QUESTION:
    What is happening in my case? Advice needed. Please help.?
    Hi all,

    I am 29 years old, I conceived after 8 years of my marriage through IUI. I went for 3 cycles and the last one has been clicked. I have no complications when I was conceived. In the fourth month I have been diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes. From that time, I have taken the insulin daily to keep my blood sugar under control. But my doctor told not to control the food except sweets and sugar because the baby wouldn’t grow. So I completely cut off the sugar items in all my food but as a south Indian, I ate rice twice a day. Taken all the precautions in all angels. And I went to my mom’s place in my 3rd month of pregnancy. Everything was fine till the 8th month. Suddenly in 33rd week I noticed that there were no movements of my baby. I went for scan and doctor confirmed that there is no heart beat and movements. Doctor told that It is an Intra Uterine Death of 32 weeks because of Gestational Diabetes. Is that true? Why it was happened? Now a days many people are having Gestational Diabetes. They are not having their children? Many people are happily conceiving and having their babies who are already diagnosed with diabetes? But in my case what happened? And my doctor told that, it’s all your fate.
    I delivered a healthy male child through normal delivery. After delivery my sugar levels are controlled. But now I am facing another problem. The day before yesterday my fasting blood sugar is 65mg as per glucometer. After lunch (with 1.5 hour gap) I tested again with my glucometer and it showed the reading was 178mg/dl. I was a little bit worried and checked again within a half minute and it showed 160mg/dl. Why so? What is the correct reading? Why it was decreased 18 points? The second level is under control. Then I did the test after my dinner and it showed 113mg/dl. Again I checked within the minute it showed 146, and again 135. Which was correct? I was confused a lot. Again yesterday I tested after lunch it showed 199 and 165mg/dl. Again I tested after my dinner it was 216, 205, and 201. And today morning my fasting BS is 102mg/dl. Am I diabetic? I am in a confused state. What reading I should consider? Does sugar levels vary that much in a very short span of time or with in a minute? There is an information on my glucometer manual is that, “Don’t use the glucometer for the diagnosis of diabetes. It is for the monitoring of blood sugar levels of diabetic patients only.” Doctors will also check through the blood test and confirm the diabetes and not by this kind of meters. I need a sincere advice, what should I do? I am worrying about my readings? Why that much variation occur? What is the correct reading of my blood sugar? Am I diabetic or not? Please advice.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jasmine.

    • ANSWER:

  42. QUESTION:
    Could diabetes ever be an advantage in an environment?
    Could it? Diabetes is generally this, skip it if you know what it is.

    Diabetes mellitus (IPA: /ˌdaɪəˈbiːtiːz/ or /ˌdaɪəˈbiːtəs/, /məˈlaɪtəs/ or /ˈmɛlətəs/), often referred to simply as diabetes (Ancient Greek: διαβαίνειν “to pass through”), is a syndrome of disordered metabolism, usually due to a combination of hereditary and environmental causes, resulting in abnormally high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia).[2] Blood glucose levels are controlled by a complex interaction of multiple chemicals and hormones in the body, including the hormone insulin made in the beta cells of the pancreas. Diabetes mellitus refers to the group of diseases that lead to high blood glucose levels due to defects in either insulin secretion or insulin action. [3]

    Diabetes develops due to a diminished production of insulin (in type 1) or resistance to its effects (in type 2 and gestational).[4] Both lead to hyperglycaemia, which largely causes the acute signs of diabetes: excessive urine production, resulting compensatory thirst and increased fluid intake, blurred vision, unexplained weight loss, lethargy, and changes in energy metabolism. Monogenic forms, e.g. MODY, constitute 1-5 % of all cases.

    So now lets say there’s an organism that is in a low sugar environment, could it be a good thing?

    • ANSWER:
      I am diabetic and have recently had to start insulin. I don’t think there is any advantages to having diabetes. It is frustrating most of the time and I hate being diabetic.

  43. QUESTION:
    Is it a good idea to take the 3 hour glucose test, AGAIN?
    My doctor had me take the three hour glucose test, two weeks later at my doctors appointment she says I have Gestational Diabetes (Even saying WOW high sugar).. After two weeks of freaking out, dieting waiting for my next appointment so they can explain what to do or how to control GD.. I get to my new “high risk” appointment where they tell me that they had mixed up one of my tests with somebody else and it doesn’t look like I have GD at all!!!! The doctor said the first two blood sugar levels don’t match the last one and they think the blood test was mixed up.. Now they want me to take a second three hour test (which I really don’t wanna do) just to confirm I don’t have it.
    My question is after all the inconvenience, stress, money to buy super healthy food, plus Im only 20 and feeling GREAT… Should I have to go back and take another 3 hour test????
    Also Im 32 weeks and the baby is the complete right size (I had to get another ultrasound to check)
    :-P grr
    By the way the lady taking my blood samples was a total JOKE, she was talking on her phone asking her friend if she could pass a drug test so she could get a job with her… Also I asked my husband to go look for something I thought I let and realized I had it and the lady called me a bitch!

    • ANSWER:

  44. QUESTION:
    Very tired in 33 weeks of pregnancy?
    Hi all,
    I have gestational diabetes, found out at week 28. Since then, I’ve been on a controlled diet. I’ve been advised to walk at least 30 minutes but for the past 2 or 3 weeks, I’ve been feeling extremely tired and weakness in my legs especially in the morning. It’s such a struggle to get out of bed or do things. I really have to push myself. I have an appointment in less than 2 weeks where my blood sugar levels will be re-tested. Has anyone experienced this in their pregnancies? Any advice on how to gain a bit more energy? Does it mean I could be anemic or have low iron?

    • ANSWER:

  45. QUESTION:
    I have a diabetes question if you don’t hav knowledge about diabetes don’t respond i want have sincere answers?
    I can’t ask my regular md this question he’s an idiot and it’s important I go see the right specialist to help me keep diabetes under control.Im a new diabetic still learning.Most doctors advertise they deal with a list of health issues but is not always the case.How do I find out exactly what type of diabetes I have my current doctor is not smart? I had a fasting A1C test 2 years ago that showed I was borderline diabetic and was put on metaformin.I had bad reaction to that med made my levels way to low .I was then put on glipizide.After one year I wasn’t feeling well and went into er they told me I’m close to ketoacidosis (dka) my sugar was to high and I had high keytones and glucose and extreme dehydration test results.I was given a insulin shot and I felt instantly better.I then went see my md the next day and he told me I need to take a long lasting 1x a day insulin shot continuing with my glipizide pills and if on occasions I test over 250 which I do under stress and my menstrual time.I’m to take a fast acting different shot as needed only usually 1 or 2x a month.My sugar seems to be under control now even though a different dr recently told me to up my dosage daily long lasting shot and stop the glipizide saying glipizide is useless with insulin shot.That made my numbers worse higher so I myself went back to my shot in morn and 1 glipzide pill with lunch an 1 pill dinner I’m self medicating and my levels better.I’ve seen 2 different reg md dr’s and both are idiots.The real kicker is I cant get a clear answer to what kind of doctor that specializes in diabetes should I seek.Ive gotten a few different types of titles/specialists I don’t know who is the right specialist to see.Also I have never been told what type of diabetes I have.Can anyone help with info what type dr (specialist) I should seek to help specializing with diabetes,heart issues,and high blood pressure,and how do I figure out what type diabetes I have Ive asked my md and he just says its mellitus which means could be type 1,2,or gestational not a clear answer to me is why I need to find and see a diff dr. before my reg md kills me with lack of knowledge .
    Please help and only reply sincerely if you truly understand diabetes knowledge.thanks

    • ANSWER:
      There are several tests to differentiate Type 1 from Type 2. First, there’s the GAD. GAD tests for Type 1 diabetic antibodies. Type 2 diabetics will not have these antibodies. Second, there’s the c-peptide, which is a measure of insulin levels. An insulin resistant Type 2 will usually have higher insulin levels, at least at first, whereas a Type 1 will have very low or no insulin production.

      What’s more, diabetic ketoacidosis rarely occurs in a Type 2, and there’s a simple reason for this. Without getting too complicated, when a Type 1′s pancreas stop producing insulin, the body can’t unlock glucose in the blood for energy. The liver, sensing that cells aren’t being fed by glucose, starts producing ketone bodies to feed the cells. This results in ketosis, which is a perfectly healthy and normal function of the liver. Unfortunately, because there’s so much glucose in the blood–the body’s preferred method of fuel–the ketones bodies are inaccessible by the cells because they keep trying to use the glucose. The result is that ketone production ramps up to dangerous levels and blood sugar remains extremely high, at a toxic level.

      So, to sum this up, DKA is basically impossible in a Type 2 because there will always be some natural insulin production. In the presence of insulin, the rate at which ketones are produced can be controlled, even if blood sugar is very high.

      In addition, your diabetes escalated very quickly from “pre-diabetes” to full-blown, scary diabetes, and that’s unusual in a Type 2. Type 2 diabetes usually progresses slower than that.

      If the Glipizide is still working, that suggests you have some pancreatic function. That doesn’t mean you’re not Type 1. You may still be honeymooning (when the pancreas hasn’t completely stopped producing insulin yet). You didn’t say how much insulin you’re injecting, but if you find that you have a low unit:carb ratio (you’ll have to ask an insulin resistant Type 2 how much insulin he needs), that would suggest you are very insulin sensitive and, again, not like a Type 2.

      There’s also LADA – Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults – which is the slow onset of diabetes that’s often misdiagnosed as Type 2 diabetes. Because it develops so slowly, a LADA individual can appear as though she’s a pre-diabetic Type 2. Type 1 diabetics who honeymoon are sometimes misdiagnosed the same way.

      You should ask for a referral to an endocrinologist. Some endocrinologists are specialists in diabetes.

      All the best to you and good luck!

  46. QUESTION:
    I’m 29 weeks pregnant and recently found out?
    that I have gestational diabetes, I’m trying to control it with diet and exercise, I have to test my blood sugar 6 times a day, before a meal and an hour after I eat, my levels have been in the range of 77 to 124 and only 2 readings that were high 151 and 161 and both readings were after I ate my dinner I have completly changed my diet with low carbs,I’ve lost 3 pounds, by my readings does it seem like I am controling it I won’t see my doctor for another week and half and im curious if i am controling it the right way i find my self panicing when i had the reading of 166 and 151,

    • ANSWER:
      Don’t panic… that’s just a little high. You’re doing fine. Keep up the good work. There’s a very handy chart and explanation on what your blood glucose should be on this webpage:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose_tolerance_test

  47. QUESTION:
    38 weeks pregnant…?
    I am 38 weeks pregnant and have gestational diabetes. Typically I can keep my blood sugars under control. I am diet controlled, no medicine. Today I splurged…and my mom bought me a medium mcdonalds meal. My level was about 150 afterwards, and I’m not to exceed 120. Is this likely to effect my baby? I have a scheduled c section on the 2nd so not too much longer! So excited. :)

    • ANSWER:

  48. QUESTION:
    How frustrating it is to control diet and feel hungry during pregnancy…?
    I have been diagnosed with impaired glucose tolerance ( A step down to Gestational diabetes). I am 34 weeks pregnant and this was diagnosed at 31 weeks.
    My OBs doesn’t think I need to control diet except reducing sugar intake. ( I don’t take much sugar anyway)
    However my endocrinologist think I should be strict with my diet and monitor blood glucose level twice a day two hours after meal, which I have been doing for fast few days.

    When I started to measure blood glucose after meals I realised in order to maintain it below 7 mmol/l ( the upper level of normal range) I nearly have to starve my self. I constantly feel hungry and uncomfortable.

    Please give any advices guys, if you have been diagnosed before with gestational diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, how did you cope?

    If you can list down or provide a link for a sample meal plan that would be great.

    Thanks in advance for your responses.

    • ANSWER:
      Ok..I can tell you how frustrating it has been and if you’d like someone to chat with, feel free to contact me via this email address: jo.vantreese@carrier.utc.com.

      I failed my 1 hour glucose tolerance test at week 26, went back at week 28 for the 3 hour, failed it miserably! So, the next day I was at a dietician’s office where I was given a pretty strict diet to follow. It was basically:
      Breakfast: 2 carbs, 1 protien, 1 fat
      AM snack: 1 carb, 1 protein
      Lunch: 3 carbs, 2 proteins, 2 fats
      Snack: 1 carb, 1 protein
      Dinner: 4 carbs, 3 proteins, 2 fats
      PM snack: 1 carb, 1 protein

      After about 2 weeks of that diet and a visit to my doctors office, my blood sugar was getting higher and I was belly growling hungry at every meal and snack! I talked to my doctor and my dietician. (oh, I’d lost 2 pounds as well at week 32 w/only a 15 pound total weight gain at week 30).

      My dietician increased my calories from 1800 to 2400 and added a carb at lunch and atleatst 1 protein, a carb at dinner and a protein, and a carb and protein at both afternoon snacks.

      My belly has been very satisfied, however my sugar is still a little high. I was put on a pill to control my diabetes, but in my opinion it’s not doing that great of a job, but they are not raising it yet.

      Really…if you want someone to chat with email me. That’s my work email so I only answer during the day, not at night.

  49. QUESTION:
    Gestational Diabetes?
    Hi,

    I am in my 19th week of my pregnancy and took the Glucose test 2 days before. The report shows the sugar level as 124 mg/dl.
    I took that GCT in the evening without fasting after having 50gm of glucose . I gave the blood sample one hour later after having the glucose.

    Kindly let me know whether it is too high?
    How to control this level if it is too high.

    Thanks in Advance

    • ANSWER:
      Gestational diabetes: Checking your blood sugar
      If you have gestational diabetes, you need to know when your blood sugar level is outside the safe range. Fortunately, you can see what your blood sugar level is anywhere and anytime by using a home blood sugar meter. Within a minute or two, you can know what your blood sugar level is.

      Key points
      Knowing your blood sugar level helps you treat low or high blood sugar before it becomes an emergency.
      Knowing your blood sugar level also helps you know how exercise and food affect your blood sugar and how much insulin to take (if you take insulin).
      Checking your blood sugar helps you feel more in control of your diabetes during your pregnancy.
      Four keys to success in monitoring your blood sugar are:
      Keep your meter and supplies with you at all times.
      Make it a habit to check your blood sugar level. Build it into your routine.
      Prick the sides of your fingers, not the tips. The tip of a finger is more sensitive than its sides.
      Check your blood sugar meter’s accuracy when you visit your doctor. Compare your results with your doctor’s results.

      http://diabetes.webmd.com/home-blood-sugar-monitoring-when-you-have-gestational-diabetes#tp17112

  50. QUESTION:
    Gestational Diabetes?
    I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes three weeks ago. During this time I have followed the regimen my doctor suggested for carb intake and after one week when my blood sugars were not at the right levels I added walking every day to my routine. My after meal blood sugars started to go down to levels that they were supposed to be at. No matter what I did my fasting blood sugars in the morning were still too high. Now the doctor, after three weeks of trying to get them under control, has put me on a long acting insulin that I started two days ago. My fasting blood sugars in the morning are still too high and I have trace amounts of ketones in my urine. What will they do now, have me take more insulin? Or does it take time for the insulin to work? I guess I’m concerned about the ketones too because I feel like I’m eating enough.
    My fasting blood sugars are usually above 90 but below 110. My doctor wants them below 90.
    Eating up to 30grams of carbs for breakfast, 30-45 for lunch and supper and 15-30 for snacks, per the doctors instructions. sometimes it is hard to even eat that much.

    • ANSWER:
      They will up your insulin. I found out that I had GD about 2 weeks ago and couldn’t get my numbers down through diet and exercise so I started insulin last week. I have to call the hospital every morning to report my numbers and they will tell me how to adjust the insulin. Sometimes it will be different amounts for my morning and evening shots. Right now i am on N6R8 but I think I will have to up my evening shot to N6R10 as of tomorrow. Insulin should act immediately, it doesn’t need time to kick in.

      I am also having trouble with ketones in my urine and they want me to eat more (even though i am not hungry) which will make sugar numbers go up. It is such a P.I.T.A. Only 10 more weeks to go :)


Controlling Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetics

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or animal.

Normally, in mammals the body maintains the blood glucose level at a reference range between about 3.6 and 5.8 mM (mmol/L). It is tightly regulated as a part of metabolic homeostasis.

Glucose is the primary source of energy for body’s cell, lipids (in the form of fats and oils) being primarily a compact energy store.

It is transported from the bowels or liver to body cells via the bloodstream, and is captivated by body cells with the interference of the hormone insulin normally produced by the body.

Causes of Low Blood Sugar

1. Overmedication with insulin or antidiabetic pills (for example, sulfonylurea drugs)

2. Use of medications such as beta blockers, pentamidine, and sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim (Bactrim, Septra)

3. Use of alcohol

4. Missed meals

5. Reactive hypoglycemia is the result of the late insulin let go after a meal has been absorbed and occurs 4-6 hours after eating.

6. Severe infection

7. Cancer causing poor oral intake or cancer involving the liver

8. Adrenal insufficiency

Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar

1. Blurred vision
2. Fatigue

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What effect, if any, does intake of artificial sweeteners have on blood sugar levels in diabetics?
    I am a recently diagnosed diabetic, taking the maximum dose of one of the combination metiformin drugs. My sugar still isn’t entirely under control yet, though my intake of sugars and starches is almost nil. Do artificial sweeteners impact the ability of the body to metabolize sugars? What other steps can I take to reduce my blood sugar level, short of going onto insulin? Yes, I do get exercise every day, and yes I am working on losing weight.

    • ANSWER:
      the sugar mentioned in “blood sugar” is glucose. natural sugars and starches are metabolized to glucose. if you use a sweetener that is not a carbohydrate, those with chemical formula Cn(H2O)n, you probably won’t see an increase in glucose (although, since there is carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen present in those artificial sweeteners, it is theoretically possible for your body to build glucose out of their metabolites). For example, aspartame has the chemical formula C14H18N2O5. in order to raise your blood glucose, your body would need to convert this to C6H12O6. i’m not aware of any enzyme that catalyzes this conversion. xylitol, sucralose, saccharin, and others do not have the necessary Cn(H2O)n structure to be converted to glucose.

      on the other hand, your body still needs glucose for efficient energy production, so it will convert other molecules in your body– such as glycogen, triglycerides, and proteins– into glucose. it sounds like you are doing all the right things… exercising will help you get rid of extra glucose storage forms (fat, glycogen) as well as keep your muscle proteins from being broken down and converted to glucose. controlling your diet is going to be extremely difficult, as carbohydrates are present in pretty much everything, from bread to milk to fruit… you are forcing a big change on your body and it will probably be very stubborn about accepting it. so your glucose levels will probably drop very gradually provided you follow your doctor’s advise precisely. you may notice that eating foods sweetened with artificial sweeteners actually cause you to crave more sweets. it’s frustrating, i know…

      if you are an adult, as i suspect you are, then you most likely have what is known as type II insulin-resistant or adult-onset diabetes mellitus. your pancreas makes plenty of insulin, but your liver doesn’t recognize it. so taking insulin supplements will not help you. i know some people who have been diagnosed with type II diabetes and they take insulin shots, but there is no medical or biological reason why they should. it’s generally a bad idea to overdose your body with any hormone. then again, i suppose it is possible that you had juvenile diabetes which went undiagnosed. in that case, you are probably taking the wrong medication for your condition, and insulin injections may be a very good option.

      metformin is great for reducing insulin-resistance (allowing your body to use the insulin that it has been producing), but it doesn’t work for everyone. since you are taking a metformin combination, you’ve probably already tried regular metformin, right? have you tried any other anti-diabetic medications? there are a number of good ones out there, talk to your doctor about your individual needs. you might ask about thiazolidinediones like avandia which also help you use the insulin your pancreas makes.

      if at any time your pancreas stops functioning for whatever reason (worn out, cancer, whatever) you will need insulin supplements.

  2. QUESTION:
    Why must our blood glucose levels be controlled?
    Why must our blood glucose levels be controlled?
    What hormone is involved in controlling our blood glucose levels?
    Where is the hormone made?
    Where does this hormone have its affect?
    Diabetics can not controlle their blood sugar level properly. How is this treated?

    • ANSWER:
      > Why must our blood glucose levels be controlled?
      Having blood glucose level too low means things like feelings of weariness. Way too low means coma and death.
      Having blood glucose level too high can bring things like nerve damage (including blindness!), decreased healing of wounds, increased susceptibility to injury infections.

      > What hormone is involved in controlling our blood glucose levels?
      Insulin is the primary one, but also glucagon.

      > Where is the hormone made?
      The “islet of Langerhans” cells of the Pancreas

      > Where does this hormone have its affect?
      The cells of the body. It permits them to move glucose from the bloodstream into the cell interiors.

      > Diabetics can not controlle their blood sugar level properly. How is this treated?
      There are two main forms of diabetes.
      Type 1 diabetes is treated with injections of insulin.

      Type 2 diabetes is treated with:
      Exercise
      Diet
      Weight loss
      Certain prescription drugs (metformin, and a few others)
      If those things don’t help enough, then also injections of insulin

  3. QUESTION:
    Do Diabetics have glucagon in their body?
    Normally the pancreas releases insulin and glucagon to control the blood sugar level. But in diabetics the pancreas does not produce insulin which makes the blood sugar rise. But is there glucagon in the pancreas to stop the blood sugar level from decreasing?

    • ANSWER:
      Type 1 diabetics have a problem making insulin in the Beta cells of the pancreas. This can be from a genetic issue that is rare, or it can develop from getting a virus. At any rate, the insulin is secreted when excess glucose is put into the blood stream to unlock the cellular door to allow glucose in to create ATP energy. Glucagon is made in the Alpha cells of the pancreas and is what causes the liver to store glucose when the excess is perceived by the hypothalamus. The glucagon causes the REDUCTION of sugar in the blood, just the opposite of your question statement.

      Each cell in your body has insulin receptors that act like a lock to prevent glucose from entering the cells until insulin arrives and unlocks those doors. If these cells keep getting bombarded by insulin knocking on the cellular “door,” they become fatigued and that is what causes insulin resistance or diabetes type 2.

      It is difficult to correct diabetes type 1, but it can be done. Diabetes type 2 takes about 30 days to cure and is NOT done with drugs the medical way. Drug companies thrive on “Treating symptoms” and “Managing diseases,” not curing anything. There is NO money in curing diseases, but there is huge bags of money treating symptoms and managing diseases. This is why drug companies and doctors will tell you there is no cure for diabetes. They are correct if you rely on the drugs for help, but that statement that there is no cure is TOTALLY UNTRUE.

      good luck to you

  4. QUESTION:
    Can any one get Diabetics, who does not have a family history of Diabetics?
    Is it possible to get affected by diabetics who is not having a history of the same in his family? I mean, wheather it is a disease purely controlled by genes or heridity or any one can got affected? I am 40 years of age and there is no diabetic history in my family. Recently when I checked the blood sugar using a glucco meter it showed more than 3 times the normal blood sugar level. Is it dangerous to not to go for medical assistance? or can it be cured by controlling food only?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of diabetes is multifactoral. It involve interaction of our gene and our diet and lifestlye. People with family history of diabetes is more prone to get diabetes compared to those without family history especially if he/she do not control their diet, take sugar excessively and seldom exercise. But if they control their diet and avoid sugar, they might not get diabetes eventhough they have family history.

      To determine whether you have diabetes, you have to take blood during fasting, usually in the morning before breakfast. If you take blood half an hour after meal then your blood sugar will be high eventhough you dont have diabetes. The glucometer reading usually not so accurate as the result given by analyser in the hospital laboratory. If you are worried, please see a doctor and do a fasting blood glucose. Only then you can tell whether you have diabetes or not.

  5. QUESTION:
    What is a good birth control for diabetics?
    I’m a diabetic and I want to go on birth control, but I don’t know how it will react with my diabetes…so is there any good birth control out there that won’t mess with my blood sugar levels or…what is a really good birth control in general?

    • ANSWER:
      I have never heard of any birth control method causing any problem for someone with diabetes.

      What is good for you is partly a matter of preference and convenience (can you remember to take a pill every morning) and partly a matter of effectiveness.

      A gynecologist would be a good resource for an informed opinion on the options you have.

  6. QUESTION:
    What are some at-home remedies to drop blood sugar in type 1 diabetics?
    My boyfriend got diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 23. It’s been a little more than a year, but his diabetes is not very well controlled. His meals are usually between 29 and 35 carbs, sometimes a few over that. He eats when his sugar is at about 130. Usually when its lower than that, but a lot of the time he ends up dealing with levels near 250, sometimes near 300. He and I are both wondering if there is something he could maybe eat or drink that would drop it (besides beer, since that doesn’t work all the time) thanks for any input.

    • ANSWER:

  7. QUESTION:
    How long should one wait before starting on an after-dinner walk in order to reap the full benefits?
    This question has great relevance especially for diabetics trying to control blood-sugar levels. So, please try to provide a medically sound answer .

    • ANSWER:
      usually wait about 30 – 40 mins that way the food is somewhat digested and you will have the most energy at this time.

  8. QUESTION:
    any ayurvadic medicine for TYPE I DIABETICS.?
    am a 17-year-old boy and am suffering form type I diabetics and now am on daily insulin twice a day. using human insulin N and R in daily basis and i would like to know that is there any ayurvadic medicines which can be effectively control my blood sugar level without assistance of any insulin…..

    • ANSWER:
      All people with type 1 need insulin daily.

      When it was discovered in the early 1920′s, insulin was [ and still is ] a life saver.Prior to that , people just died.

      Remember how lucky you are to have insulin so that you can live a normal life.

      http://www.discoveryofinsulin.com/Home.htm

      http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/445672_2

      http://www.ehow.com/facts_5498585_diabetes-before-insulin-discovered.html

  9. QUESTION:
    do you think this would be a good christmas present? (diabetics?plz answer)?
    my uncle has type 2 diabetes. balsam pear tea is supposed to help control blood sugar levels in that type. i was thinking of getting him some for christmas but i don’t know if he even likes tea. but it could help him.

    so what should i do? should i get him some to put on the side with my parents present? or should i just forget about it and get him some other small gift? non edible because i obviously would not want to give him sugary xmas stuff.

    • ANSWER:
      My husband is also type 2 diabetes. I would try it as a gift you never know he just might like it and to know that you care about him like that is very thoughtful. And if you want to make the gift a little nice try to find a cup that he would like. If he has a team that he loves or even one that looks funny or has a funny saying on it that he could use all year round that would be a nice gift set all together.

      Hope this helps you.

  10. QUESTION:
    Do blood sugars jump around in non-diabetics?
    I’m not a diabetic, but my friend is, so I decided to check my blood sugar for two days (yesterday and today). I took the test today fasting and my first reading came back 88. I decided to test again, so I did and it was 94. I thought that was high, so I used his control solution to test the meter and the meter was accurate, so I tested again and my level was 104. Yesterday when I tested fasting I had 83 the first time and 82 the second time. Is it normal for blood sugar to jump around like this when your not a diabetic? I know all of my levels are considered in the “normal” range, but 104 was scary to me. Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      a NORMAL blood sugar reading is ANY reading in the range 80-120 a 94 is great, and so is the 104.

      NO ONES blood sugar stays at one constant level. The actual reading depends on WHEN, WHAT, adn HOW MUCH you ate, how much you have exercised, your general health level (do you have a cold), AND your personal stress level.

      FOOD is the primary reason that blood sugar goes high. If you eat birthday cake and cola before taking the test, your reading WILL be high — maybe 300 or more. But 4 hours later, you will be hungry again, and your blood sugar reading may be 115. ONE high blood sugar reading is NOT to be worried about!

      Exercise is supposed to lower you blood sugar level, but in fact, during the exercise and for about an hour after, exercise actually RAISES your blood sugar . it is the LONG TERM effects of exercise that are important, NOT the immediate changes.

      Your physical and mental health conditions have large effects. If you have an infection your blood sugar WILL go high. Your body is producing its own sugars to help the white cells fight the “invading” germs. ANd your mental health level ALSO affects blood sugar . If you have job or marital stress, your blood sugar will be high. It is important that you always deal with stressful situations in a quick and positive manner. Don;t “stuff” stress! Don’t hide it — talk it out!

      If you don’t eat for 10 hours (like, going ot bed), then you blood sugar will be LOW. If it drops lower than 70, you need to talk to your doctor about possible Hypoglycemia.

      Blood sugar readings jump around ALL the time. In fact, if you use the same meter and take another test 30 minutes later, you will get an entirely different reading.

  11. QUESTION:
    diabetic pt who is out of control. her blood sugar fluctuates from low to high. Goes low every night?
    my aunt has battled type 1 diabetes for years and has never taken care of herself properly. she would drink and smoke and just generally not care about her health. She was started on the insulin pump awhile back and her pump was faulty and was sending her out of whack insulin levels. But she has since got a new pump and she is still always running low. She uses people that love her and medications to her advantage. she will sleep all day and will not eat. she will drop so low that she can not eat or drink and she will have to get a glucagon shot then drink cokes. she regularly has a blood sugar in the teens. She is know living with my elderly grandmother who can barely take care of herself let along another person. My grandmother has to set the alarm every two hours to check her sugar cause my aunt will not wake up and check it herself having to give her a shot or atleast make her eat or drink something. I am wondering if there is a home thats for diabetics or is that just a nursing home? I do not know what to do. i know it is a matter of time before she kills herself and my grandma whos already suffered two strokes. anyone that has any information that will help us is greatly appreciated. PS my grandma has been cooking her three full meals daily so i know she has been eating but is still low. maybe she is boosting her pump to much herself? i jsut dont know what to do
    thanks for your input. see thats the thing i know its like a drug addict she needs to want to take care of herself. im a paramedic student myself. She has a specialist and has had one for years. She will be up around 300 before bed and a few hours later my grandma will hear her she will be in her low 20s even teens. Then medics come give her D50 and she comes back she drinks and eats and denies transport. its a regular thing. I am concerned more with my grandma because this is causing her problems. her diabetes have been like this for years so i dont see her changing. but i know my grandma would rather die trying to help her rather than kicking her lazy ass out and making her grow up and take care of herself. did i mention shes almost 50 and had diabetes since she was ten years old. i repeat nothing, we just dont know what to do. reason i am asking on here is i live out of state and can do nothing for them physically

    • ANSWER:
      oh gosh this is very bad indeed :( Being that she’s a type 1 diabetic, her pancreas is not making any insulin at all which makes her insulin dependent and therefore she absolutely NEEDS insulin to survive. The fact that she drops low and high also is very dangerous. If she drops too low she could go unconscious and may need to be rushed to the hospital. Going too high can also cause progressive iriversable damage to her kidneys, eyes, blood vessels…

      I would really think it would be helpful for her to speak to her health care physician. Why is she not monitoring her glucose? There must be a reason. Perhaps someone could ask/discuss the issues with her. Her doctor needs to discuss with her how much insulin she she needs to be taking. This will depend on how much food she eats and what her blood sugar is when she checks it. There usually is a “scale” they give people so they know how much insulin to give themsevles for how much they ate.

      Sorry if I wasn’t more help but ultimately it is up to her. There’s no diabetic clinics that I know of but an assisted living home would be an alternative.

  12. QUESTION:
    Does diabetes make you moody?
    I’ve been a Type I diabetic for 16 years, no complications yet, but lately I’ve felt as if my mood and energy is negatively affected by changes in my blood sugar levels. I’m in reasonably good control, test several times a day, but inevitably it is a balancing act and having diabetes implies that glucose levels are never stable. I have, however, noticed that my mood improves when I limit my carbohydrate and starch intake, eating more protein. I also tend to get very, very tired when my blood sugar is above, say, 180 or so and I literally fall asleep when it hits about 230. I feel cognitively lethargic when it gets to this level as well, which is incredibly frustrating. Anyway, it’s a constant balancing act, and I’m just wondering whether other diabetics also feel as if their moods are more volatile compared to non-diabetics?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, type 1 is definitely a constant balancing act. Everything that you do will affect your blood sugar level. I agree that our moods are more volatile compared to non diabetics. When my blood sugar goes above 200, I also feel very lethargic. When it drops too low, I become Satan. Every time my ex-boyfriend and I would get in a fight he would tell me that I needed to check my blood sugar because I was being mean. It would infuriate me, especially when he was right.

  13. QUESTION:
    PLEASE HELP! How do you ease joints locking up in diabetics?
    My boyfriend’s dad has been having REALLY bad trouble with his feet. Because he is diabetic, his feet curl up and stiffen causing excruciating pain. It happens almost every night and the only thing that helps is that my bf rubs out the cramps, but they come back about 4 or 5 times a night.

    The ONLY information I have is that his pancreas isn’t shut down compleatly like most diabetics. It sporadically produces insulin and therefore messes up his blood sugar. It is VERY difficult to control it’s levels.

    Their family has a low budget, but I would like ANY possible information you can conjure up. NO matter how miniscule or bizarre. Please help. Thank you.
    I found out also that it is most likely his ligaments or his tendons that are tightening up.

    • ANSWER:
      I’ll answer the pancreas part.

      It’s important that he tests his BG before bed and on occasions during the night. eg 2am. I know this can be annoying but having been a Type 1 for 24 years I have learnt sometimes the hard way. Hypos during the night certainly should be avoided.

      Beware also that exercise before bed should be calculated into BG control as it will reduce BG levels. The effect however may not occur until 1-2 hours afterwards. Thus a reading at 2am etc would be best when starting this sort of program.

      One more thing is footwear. Ensure he has good quality socks for circulation. Also I recently spent 0 on designed shoes and the difference is amazing. Perhaps medical benefits will cover or even a collection amongst family/friends?

      Good luck, hope things improve.

  14. QUESTION:
    Pre-diabetic… advice on controlling it?
    I got my test results back from my doc, and my fasting glucose level was in the pre-diabetic range. I do have diabetes (type 2 I’m assuming) in my family’s history.

    Usually with pre-diabetics, the advice is to lose weight. Well, I’m 5’5″ and 120 lbs, so I don’t have much to lose! Other than the obvious of toning down refined sugars, is there anything else I can do? Are there foods that support blood glucose levels?

    Also, I looove fruit smoothies. I make them with fresh fruits and don’t add sugar or milk or yogurt. I also really like dried fruit. Will fruit make my sugar levels spike?
    Yan: Thanks for the info. I’m not on insulin, as I’ve not been diagnosed diabetic but in the pre-diabetic range. I’m absolutely horrified of needles (just getting the blood test that gave me this information was an ordeal!), and at 29 years old I want to nip this in the bud so I never need to!

    I don’t eat mostly fruit, but I have an easier time with fruit than with veggies. I’ve discovered that I can eat anything if it’s in a smoothie (even cactus!). I know I don’t get enough exercise, though. I’m so low energy all the time that it’s hard, plus I faint easily. =( That’s part of the reason my diet has been so bad… I’m just SO run down that taking time to prepare a healthy meal is often more than I can manage.

    • ANSWER:
      At your weight, I would suggest getting antibody tests as well as a C-peptide test. You may be developing type 1 diabetes.

      If it turns out that you really are (don’t let a doctor tell you you are, demand blood testing) a typical pre-type2, arm yourself with information.

      The first thing you need is a prescription for a blood glucose meter so you can test your levels at home. This gives you instant feedback about how different things impact your blood sugar.

      Second, as you know, work on eating balanced meals with moderate amounts of complex carbs and plenty of protein, veggies, so on. Obviously, don’t try to reduce your calories or lose weight. And, yes, fruit can raise your blood glucose level as it, like almost all foods, contains carbs. That doesn’t mean you can’t have them, but it does mean that moderation is important.

      Third, work out! This can do wonders in controlling blood glucose levels as well as making you plain old healthier in general.

      You may want to seek out one of the many online diabetes forums or community, as they are a source of information, as well as support and encouragement.

  15. QUESTION:
    Type I Diabetics Only: How Long Have You Had it and What Complications Have You Had?
    I am 31 and was diagnosed at age 15; so far so good in terms of complications, but I always had it drilled into me that complications were more or less inevitable eventually. Yes, there are exceptions, and I am in reasonably good control (I’ve been on an insulin pump since I was 20 thanks to a forward-thinking endocrinologist), but no diabetic has perfect blood sugar. My sister is a Type I diabetic as well, as was diagnosed two years before me, has had two children, and has had no complications either. Frankly I think that we have been ‘lucky’ since we both periodically run into the 300s and might be characterized as brittle diabetics. I’d say our A1C levels hover around the 7 areas. Anyway, I’m just curious to know what your experiences with complications have been; it’s always been interesting to me how the disease affects different people in different way.

    • ANSWER:
      I was diagnosed as type 1 when I was 9. I’m 43 now, so it’s been 34 years. As for the complications, well, I’ve been through most all of them. In 1985, I was diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy, which was corrected with laser treatments, and has been stable ever since (9 laser in al, and still 20/20 vision). Hypertension and heart disease were exacerbated both by diabetes and huge amounts of stress I was under at work. I have neuropathy, although somewhat mild. I had triple bypass surgery in 1997 when I was 34. And, in 1992, I underwent a Simultaneous Pancreas and Kidney transplant, which had me completely off insulin injections for almost 5 years. During that time, my overall health and my neurpoathy seemed to improve, although it was short-lived, as the organs succumbed to chronic rejection and eventually failed. Had a subsequent kidney transplant in 1999, which has lasted 8 years, but the strain fo diabetes on what is essentially a foreign kidney is causing ti to slowly die out. And, yes, I kept good control over things, although it was rather difficult when I reached adolescence, and my entire metabolism and body chemistry were changing. I’ve also found that, as renal function deteriorates, glucose control gets a bit more difficult, but that’s also because the renal disease has also led to hypoglycemic unawareness, leaving me insensitive and somewhat asymptomatic to the drop in levels until its way far down (like in the 30′s?). Don’t mean to frighten you, but let you know what I’ve been through. And, I am characterized as brittle diabetic.

  16. QUESTION:
    Diabetes & Birth Control…help?
    Hey, I have Cystic Fibrosis related diabetes, and it’s well controlled, I am able to maintain my A1c very well, and I am at a very healthy weight, I’m about 126 and 5’7, and 21 years old. I am going to my OB-GYN in a few weeks, and I know I will get better answers from them, but what the heck kind of birth control do you use for diabetics? I have been with my boyfriend for about 4 months, and we’ve been sexually active, but I still want that extra re-assurance of birth control, but everything that I have read pretty much says that BC pills and hormones make blood sugar levels rise. I really don’t want to change what I have going, because it took me a really long time to get where I am today, so I wanted to hear from other female diabetics and their birth control experiences. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Diabetics can take any birth control so do not worry.
      The oral contraceptive pill is as effective on a diabetic as any other woman.
      Any changes in sugar levels will be almost non existent.
      I am diab and have been on pill without any side effects (or failures) for years.
      Good luck

  17. QUESTION:
    Have you read that lady’s fingers and barley could be used to treat diabetes?
    I posted this question yesterday, and it got reported this morning for violation. I don’t know why anyone would report something that might be life saving. Anyway, here’s posting the question again with the information.

    I received an email from a friend with the following information. If you are diabetic or if you have friends who are diabetic, perhaps you could consider the following information? The recommendation isn’t meant to replace insulin treatment – rather it is to complement the existing treatment – I suppose there is no harm trying the recommended treatment, since lady’s fingers and barley are natural, healthy vegetables and grains. :)

    +++

    “Please note that another name for Lady Finger (Bhindi ) is ” OKURA “. Last month in one of TV program I learnt of a treatment of Sugar (Diabetes). Since I am diabetic, I tried it and it was very useful and my Sugar is in control now. In fact I have already reduced my medicine. Take two pieces of Lady Finger (Bhindi) and remove/cut both ends of each piece. Also put a small cut in the middle and put these two pieces in glass of water. Cover the glass and keep it at room temperature during night. Early morning, before breakfast simply remove two pieces of lady finger (bhindi) from the glass and drink that water. Keep doing it on daily basis. Within two weeks, you will see remarkable results in reduction of your SUGAR. My sister has got rid of her diabetes. She was on Insulin for a few years, but after taking the lady fingers every morning for a few months, she has stopped Insulin but continues to take the lady fingers every day. But she chops the lady fingers into fine pieces in the night, adds the water and drinks it all up the next morning. Please. try it as it will not do you any harm even if it does not do much good to you, but U have to keep taking it for a few months before U see results, as most cases might be chronic.”

    —–

    “Diabetics should eat more barley as the fibre will prevent blood sugar levels from rising too high. It also provides relief from constipation or diarrhoea for those suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome.”
    I am not sure how much scientific support and research have been done on this recommended treatment. I suppose you could google “lady’s fingers”, “barley” and “diabetes”. It is up to your discretion on whether you want to implement this treatment, and how best to implement it.
    I guess some westerners may not know the asian natural methods of healing and health. They have no concept of heatiness and cooling effects that food can give, though it’s a generally known fact amongst asians. Lady’s fingers are common in asia, especially in third world countries, though I think many supermarkets in USA should sell them.
    Thanks for your faith-filled words, bro gj3. Thanks for your kind words too, sis Tallulah. I received the testimony from a friend’s email, so I thought it’s encouraging to share with people here. I think complementary medicine sounds great – I agree with your doctor’s advice.

    • ANSWER:
      Most of the medical doctors restricted taking a herbal supplements during their treatments. The reason being is FDA did not approve to use it and there is no money making behind this. My doctor do not want me to take herbal supplements during my chemo therapy. But I still taking it. God said “I will provide everything that you need here on earth.” That is including this herbal supplements. In Revelation Jesus talking about the leaves of the tree of life will heal the nations. I know this is for the future events. I believed that there is application here for our own good. Like for example these herbs that they discovered that good in our health. In the same thing the “organic foods” that available to us right now. If we will stay on this “organic foods” I believed that we will live longer and healthier. We made our own problems when we use our own idea to make more money and forget about our health. I’m not saying all but some of the farmers that they produce our food at the market, they put steroids on their plants, animals and we end it up eating these and the result is obesity that cause of cancer, diabetics and many more disorder in us. The FDA should attack this issues but they were silence about this because they make money out of this things. Our food right now are so infected of hormones, pesticides, and all other things that will kill us slowly. Yes, I believed some of the herbs were located in the third world countries. I came from the Philippines and we used all kinds of herbs to heal our wounds, sore throat, common colds, and many more. Even though God blessed us with His wisdom and talents to make our own medicine from chemicals is not a bad idea and God provides us with these herbs to heal and cure our body. Now we need to choose what to eat. Organic or not. These will accomplished in according to His will, and His own time in our life.

  18. QUESTION:
    Diabetes Question & Your Teeth?
    I have been to the dentist on many of occasions. I have had teeth removed, x-rayed, and filled. The dentist told me that my teeth were all hallow inside. The jaw teeth both bottom and tops. The teeth are nice and shinny on the outside of the teeth because I brush them often and floss them. Before, I told him that I had diabetes. He looked at me and said, “You must be a diabetic.” I ask him about it and he told me that in some diabetics the pulp in their teeth dies and disappears because their blood sugar levels is out of control or their blood is not normal. He said it was a way for him to know if a patient has diabetes even it the patient does not know they have it. How much truth is in his statements. Could someone do research into that area of study? I later ask my youngest son’s dental surgeon whom works at the Children’s Hospital and, he said the very same thing.

    • ANSWER:
      It’s called Periodontal disease, sir, and it’s more common in diabetes patients. This does NOT mean, however, that all diabetics will suffer with it.

      There are many pages on the internet that offer advice and explanations about periodontal disease. Here are just a few.

  19. QUESTION:
    Teenage diabetic type 1 help?
    Well. I am a sixteen year old teenage girl and I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a year and a half ago (precisely 13 Jan 2010…had an exam the next day and I was clueless about it).

    So far, I find myself able to control my levels…if I bother. As in, if I check my blood sugar levels regularly, I usually manage to accurately estimate how much insulin I need to take for a meal…with the occasional mess-up here and there.

    The main problem is in the following fact. I am desperately unmotivated, at times, to regulate my blood sugar. It may be the fact that I get annoyed by how I have to check how much I am allowed to eat, what I am not ‘allowed’ to have, how everyone who knows about my ‘situation’ seems to avoid wanting to talk about it and mostly how I find myself unable to talk to another girl about certain issues which affect us…in terms of our menstruation cycles and pregnancy and what not.

    Now I want to go to someone to talk…be it a consultant or a psychologist. I just feel the need to converse with someone who will treat me like I am a mature and sane person (and I am…personality wise at least) and not relay everything back to my parents, since my mom openly worries a lot until it gets suffocating ( but she is getting better ) and my dad is in denial of the fact that I am indeed ill and that there is a problem which needs to be solved. So when I start a topic of wanting to go to someone and talk about it, my dad brushes it off, saying that ‘There is no need sweetie. There is no problem. If you want, we can make an appointment with your endocrinologist…where one of my parental units will attend.
    My mom, on the other hand, started crying and then, after calming down, offered to talk with me about it, on the basis that she was a type 2. But I do not deal well with crying women…especially if I am the cause. So I tend to not tell anyone in my family if I am going high or low unless it is somewhat a bigger than usual problem.

    School is not really an option…because our system is a ridicule in, and of itself. There is no order whatsoever and you can kiss confidentiality in the a**. Of course, that is ignoring the fact that out ‘consultant’ is very hard to find in school, if she even exists.

    Now, all I am searching for in this long speech of mine…is help, since obtaining any in real life is incredibly…hard.

    I want someone to give me motivation. Because, no matter what I do, there is always this week where I refuse to take insulin, until after the meal by 2-3 hours…when I start feeling parched and guilty. Self-motivation can only take you so far.

    And if it wouldn’t be too much trouble…are there any diabetics who got the condition before getting pregnant? I am still young, and I do not plan on even attempting the act before I am 22, but I am really afraid… I want to give birth, but I refuse to have my babies harmed in any way. Would you please provide advice or a way of communication…it is one topic which keeps nagging in the recess of my mind during the day.

    Second thing: While I can control my blood sugar when I choose to(most of the time), my snacks are usually unhealthy. Any tips for integrating healthy habits into my daily routine…like kinds of fruits(I eat most of them…aside from apples.) or home-made, satisfying meals, would be greatly appreciated.

    P.S. The reason for the excessive details was a silent request for whoever would provide the advice to seek help from a doctor/other professionals. I am not willing to face the trials in order for that to happen. What I basically want, is assurance backed with firm evidence.

    Oh…and I am usually hyper and un-depressed, so no need for any worrying from that sense

    Thank you in advance.

    Cheers :D

    • ANSWER:
      Here’s a second recommendation for tudiabetes.org. It is an online networking site for diabetics. I call it ‘Facebook on insulin’. Almost everyone on there has diabetes themselves, and if they don’t, they are the loved one of a diabetic. There are discussion groups for various interests including a few for teens/young people with Type 1. I think you would be able to find people who really understand what you are going through.

      For what it’s worth, here’s my two cents. So diabetes sucks big time and so we all wish we didn’t have a horrible incurable disease. But the complications of diabetes suck even bigger time. That’s what motivates me to keep going – I concentrate on a picture of myself blind, limbless and attached to a dialysis machine and I think, no thanks. That’s not going to be me. And the best way of making sure that’s not going to be you, is to take control of your diabetes and not let it take control of you.

      Something you said about what you are ‘allowed’ to eat. Actually, as a Type 1 diabetic, you are allowed to eat anything you want. You just have to bolus insulin to match your food. You have complete flexibility over your diet! Of course, you shouldn’t go insane and drink 3 gallons of regular Coke in one sitting. But if you wanted to have a donut (22g carb), French fries (32g carb for a small serving) or a KitKat (15g carb) – go ahead and do it! Just make sure you inject the insulin to match that. If you don’t know how to carb count, now’s the time to learn.

      You will find it most mentally liberating once you realize you CAN eat anything. It is just a matter of matching insulin. Of course, you have to be sensible about this, but you sound like a sensible person.

      As for pregnancy – I was diagnosed with Type 1b last June and am now 15 weeks pregnant. There is no reason why diabetics cannot have safe pregnancies like everyone else. The main issue is that blood sugar levels need to be kept as close to non-diabetic as possible. That means A1C of under 6.5 before you try to conceive. Under 6 is even better. When blood sugar is at non-diabetic levels, the risk goes down to the same as a non-diabetic woman. But when blood sugar is uncontrolled, diabetic pregnancy is high-risk and faces the chance of birth defects, stillbirths, and harm to mother and baby.

      Finally your question about ‘unhealthy’ snacks. Well, define unhealthy. From a diabetes management point of view, anything that raises your blood sugar beyond the safe range is unhealthy. I don’t eat ‘healthy’ snacks like bananas or granola bars because they are extremely high in carbs and raise my blood sugar beyond the safe range. Yes, I could inject insulin for them but those things don’t excite me enough to want to inject insulin. Whereas ham and cheese roll ups won’t raise blood sugar by much, neither will nuts, avocados or olives. The point is that you have to think about what ‘healthy’ means because when you have a serious carbohydrate metabolism dysfunction, what is ‘healthy’ for you is not the same as what is ‘healthy’ for people with normal metabolisms.

  20. QUESTION:
    What is a good diabetic meal plan for a 35 year old diabetic man ?
    Please help me out. I need to know the answers to these questions but i dont have the book because i cant afford it for class :(

    Your client is a 35 year old male diabetic who maintains his weight and controls his blood glucose levels on 2600 calories a day. His usual eating pattern is:
    breakfast:3 starch, 1 fruit, 2 milk, 2 meat
    lunch: 3 starch, 2 fruit, 2 veggie. 3 ,meat
    snack: 2 starch, 1 fruit, 2 meat
    dinner: 3 starch, 2 veggie, 4 meat
    bedtime snack: 2 starch, 1 fruit, 1 meat

    2. use table D-1 in the appendix of your textbook to determine the grams of carbohydrate in each meal and his total grams for the day.

    3. how many of his calories should come from carbohydrates each day (use the AMDR range for carb of %45-65%)

    4. Hiw many grams of carbohydrates should he consume each day (use your answer from question 3)

    5. Does his usual eating pattern contribute more or less carbohydrate than what he should consume?

    6. Diabetics’ carbohydrate intake should be evenly distributed throughout the day to help maintain constant blood glucose levels. How would you adjust his eating patter to attain a more even distribution of carbohydrate?

    7. Develop a 1-day meal plan for this client by translating his usual eating pattern into food choices (use appendix D for serving sizes and foods in each food group.)

    8. If he is hungrier than usual but does not want to increase his blood sugar levels by going over his “allowed” carbohydrate levels, what are three foods he could safely eat?
    dinner: 3 starch

    • ANSWER:

  21. QUESTION:
    Major Help Please! How can a juvenile diabetic lose weight safely?
    Hello there, and thank you so much for reading this!
    Okay so first things first i am a diabetic diagnosed at the age of 12. Im 16 yrs old, about a good 165lbs, 5’3ft tall (not really sure if this helps) and i am struggling to get my blood sugar levels under control (as well as my weight) I’ve been to my doctor recently and she’s constantly telling me i need to exercise more. Lately, I’ve been jogging (or fast paced walking) on a treadmill for 30 min each day at around 3 mph
    I would like to know if this enough exercise for me or do i need to do more work.
    Also, i would love to know if any other diabetics have lost weight by actual exercise. I would love to hear some stories to get me motivated :)

    *Additional details*

    I absolutely DO NOT want to resort to weight loss pills. I have heard they are unsafe and only result in making your weight worse. My closest friend tried them and she tried selling me some.

    I started cutting down on fats and sweets as well as my portions.

    Also, since im using a treadmill, do I need running shoes? I’ve been running in my Converse lately and find my ankles hurting after I exercise.

    And finally, any tips on how to control your blood sugar levels? Oh, and my chorestrol levels are on the bad side right now :( If you could give me some tips on how to lower them down (besides eating cherrios) that would be very kind of you :)

    Thank You so much to anyone who answers my question!! :) This would certainly help me alot and hopefully help me to have a more healthier lifestyle! and p.s im sorry i wrote so much

    • ANSWER:
      As you probably know by now, anything you do will affect your blood sugar. The safest thing to do it just eat healthier and exercise more. Keep checking your blood sugar often and stick to the carb limits your Dr has set in place. Doing those things will allow you to lose weight and be as in control as a T1 can be.

  22. QUESTION:
    Type 1 Diabetic Having Weird Lows?
    Unless you know about Type 1 Diabetes and understand low blood sugars please save yourself some time and don’t read this question…

    I’m a 16 year old male with Type 1 Diabetes, I was diagnosed almost 3 years ago. I am on an Insulin Pump and have great control of my blood sugar levels…

    However, my lows are starting to become strange. I have all the common symptoms (hunger, dizziness, slurred speech, etc)

    But something weird is going on. Whenever i’m low, i’m starting to know what people are going to say, and have a good idea of what is going to happen in the very near future (30 minutes or so), this isn’t something that has been a one-off experience, this has happened 5 or so times.

    I don’t believe in psychics or mind reading or anything like that. I don’t think that this is my mind playing tricks, since after the low everything I thought was going to happen usually happens.

    So my question is this: Do other Type 1 Diabetics have any similar weird experiences when having a low or high? Or am I just losing my mind?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I am 22 and type one diabetic too.. I often get low blood sugar when I wake up in the morning. I feel like every thought I have when I wake up is an Epiphany and I that I can’t believe I didn’t realize whatever it was before… HOWEVER, I tried recently to write down my utterly amazing thoughts upon waking up and found that my sentence structure looked like this:

      When you when you love someone you love someone heaven opens opens heaven opens its gates. (When you love someone heaven opens its gates.)

      That wasn’t an actual sentence I wrote but an example.. It was like my mind was skipping.. Maybe it helps me analyze things a little deeper, I’m not sure. (This is at bloodsugars usually between 45-65)

  23. QUESTION:
    Can anyone recommend a diabetes cookbook that matches all this criteria?
    I don’t actually have diabetes but have a high blood sugar level that has to be kept under control to avoid getting it.

    - GI ratings for every recipe and detailed nutritional information including calories/kilojoules etc

    - Desserts that are suitable using either concentrated fruit juice (perhaps unlikely because it is a high GI sweetener but I guess it is possible the overall recipe could be low GI) or stevia/stevioside that are created in such a way to hide the bitterness and licorice flavour of the stevia or no sweetener at all.

    - All genuinely good for diabetics without too high a GI or too many carbs

    - Ingredients that can easily be obtained in Melbourne, Australia (but it can be from US or other country because I can easily convert the ingredients)

    - Most of the recipes must be reasonably easy to cook (don’t have to be all that easy) but preferably a mixture of easier and more complex dishes and not too many recipes that take an awful long time.

    - Not have salt added or be ok without salt or some alternative to salt such as balsamic vinegar

    - Recipes created mostly from scratch without having to resort to commercial supermarket items that have added salt, sugar, preservative etc

    - And of course they must taste good.

    • ANSWER:
      Don’t buy a cookbook. There are plenty of recipes online that don’t cost you a thing. Try going to www.dlife.com not only do they have recipes they also give the nutritional values of each. Here are a couple of more sites that give the nutritional values of the recipes as well.
      www.nubella.com
      /www.changingdiabetes-us.com
      www.diabeticlivingonline.com

      Also you might want to take a look at a web site called
      www.fitday.com and www.sparkpeople.com
      Both of these are great sites for helping to manage what you eat, your exercise, and overall health.
      Hope these help you. Good luck.

  24. QUESTION:
    Diabetics: what would you do if your doctor…?
    I am a low-income Type 2 diabetic. I receive health care through a community clinic, so I am limited in my options.

    I have been seeing my new doctor since December last year. After getting my lab work back, he was relieved to see that my kidneys were fine. He asked how long I had been diabetic and then responded, “Oh, you haven’t been diabetic long enough to have kidney disease.” Like the simple fact that I am diabetic means that I’ll get diabetic complications. My A1c has been in the 5% range for YEARS.

    The last time I was there, he was so impressed with my A1c and blood sugar log that he told me that he thought I was misdiagnosed as diabetic. I was taken aback. When I was diagnosed, my A1c and random blood sugar were off the charts. There’s NO doubt that I am diabetic. I insisted that I am, told him why I thought so, and that I just work really hard to control my blood sugar, but he said, “I still think you may not be diabetic.”

    Right now I’m feeling like he’s a raging incompetent about diabetes. I know that beggars can’t be choosers and I should just be glad I have health care, but I’m sort of disgusted and wondering if I should request to switch doctors at the clinic or maybe go elsewhere. The only reason I’m reluctant is because I don’t want word of this getting back to him if I can’t switch and I don’t need any special treatment or an endo because I have good control. He’s “sufficient.” I was offended that he had so little faith in me, condemning me to kidney disease, and then I was another level of horrified when he said I wasn’t diabetic.

    What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, congrats on your exemplary glycemic control.

      I don’t have any statistics at hand but from talking to my GP, I get the impression that most diabetics do not have such good blood sugars.

      For instance, my GP told me I am the only diabetic patient with the clinic who has a 5% A1C.

      I think some doctors even believe that diabetics can never have normal blood sugars. Also in the past, diabetics invariably deteriorated because people knew a lot less about blood sugar management. But things have changed so much now, and as you yourself know, diabetics have so many tools to control their disease and not let it control them.

      We also know that the higher the A1C, the greater the risk of complications. Sadly, the risk never goes down to zero, no matter how good the A1C.

      Finally I’d like to suggest that if that doctor spends a lot of time working in low-income areas, it is likely he sees lots of poorly controlled diabetics who, for various reasons, end up eating a high carb diet. He probably sees them deteriorate quickly and thinks that everybody’s going to end up like that.

  25. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have type 1 & type 2 diabetes?
    If A = If you’re fit and have diabetes, and your family has a history of diabetes, there’s a good chance you’re Type 1.
    B = If you’re fat, there’s a REALLY good chance you’re Type 2.
    So if I’m fat but I’ve been overweight my whole life but always tested no hi glucose levels or hi cholesterol & I’m healthy otherwise for years until recently I found out I have a enlarged heart and high blood pressure I’m on beta blockers & I’m on both a long lasting insulin shot 1x a day & take2 glipizide pills to control my levels.They say glipizide is type 2 that I take but I also take a insulin shot 1x a day which is type 1 so I’m confused I take both so am I type 1&2?I think I may of inherited or my genes because my father he wasn’t fat or unhealthy until around 50 he became a diabetic & had high blood sugar & kidney failure& quad bi pass & skin cancer & colon cancer.So I think I may of got diabetes by heredity from my fathers bad genes not because being fat.He was skinny.Allot people just automatically think I’m diabetic because of my weight. I believe it’s heredity.I have a 21yr old daughter that’s overweight but tested neg for diabetes& is very healthy,my son is 24 & he eats more then me & daughter & he is super lazy&does less exercise but is skinny as a board all his life he can eat a ton an not gain 1lb. I have learned allot people have their own opinions but really don’t know diabetes info allot doctors still learning.So how do I figure out what type I am or is it possible to be both types 1&2?I’m confused & my doctor is a idiot he seems to not know what type I am 1or2.I’m currently trying to find a diff doctor. I’ve learned a regular MD can not help me I’ve been to 2 neither has helped me get my sugar under control & are not smart.I have fought with being overweight my whole life my weight has not caused the diabetes. I have been obese since birth & no amount of exercise has helped at all &I’ve tried all.The kicker is I gain a little each year no matter what that I can’t loose ever I’ve spent a ton on diets & weight watcher programs nothing will make me loose & I don’t over eat I’m lucky if I eat two reg meals not large meals or unhealthy fattening meals no sugar intake at all with no snacks daily,but I stay fat. What kind of specialist can get my diabetes,high blood pressure &heart issues & unknown reason for a hi white count diagnosed and treated & get all under control & maintain control that will help me with all these issues to stay well?What type diabetic am I or is it possible to be both & what type doctor do I seek?Another question where do diabetics dispose of their used needles at I asked my pharmacist he said throw away hide in middle of my trash which I’m sure is not right!can anyone help with info?

    • ANSWER:
      Wow! Can you write or what? 8^)

      First of all, yes it is possible to have both type 1 and 2, but I think it’s rare. I have diabetes in my family, various deceased ancestors who lost legs and kidneys and died relatively young. But nobody in the family knows whether they had 1 or 2, and I wonder if they even had the distinction at the time. Type 1 and type 2 are completely different diseases, but with the same symptoms and the same results.

      Type 1 used to be called ‘juvenile diabetes’ but lots of people get it later in life. You can get it at any age really. Type 2 does NOT just happen to people who are fat. I’m Type 2 and was never that fat, though I’ve lost weight since.

      Type 1s need insulin to live, because their pancreases don’t produce enough. But these days lots of type 2s are using insulin also, to help overcome their insulin resistance. The nice thing about insulin is that it isn’t even considered a drug. Our bodies make it. So it has no bad side effects, unless you take too much of course. On my e-mail list there are lots of type 2s who have just started using insulin after being diabetic for years and years, and they all say they wished they’d tried it sooner, that it makes blood control just that much easier. Insulin is also used for patients who react negatively to the other blood-control drugs, like glipizide

      If you really want the details, ask your doctor if he can refer you to a diabetologist. That’s a doctor who specializes in diabetes. I’m surprised there aren’t more of them these days, since diabetes is almost an epidemic nowadays.

  26. QUESTION:
    Diabetics have you ever had this problem?
    Hubby is a diabetic. lately he has been having more trouble keeping his sugar at an acceptable level.We knew this was coming as the doctor told us that over time it gets harder.But what really concerns me is he is so wiped out lately. today at 5 pm he took his sugar for the first time today( note our household runs on a third shift schedule so this would actually be early to mid day for him) and it was 235 and he hadn’t eaten or drank anything at all. He is due back to the doctor on the 25th of this month but I’m thinking he needs to go back earlier.My sister in law tonight said she was wondering it it was his adrenal system(? okay I admit I’m clueless on this). He’s tired all the time, no energy,has to force himself to eat, and I might add he also has had a back surgery.He became diabetic after the surgery.What scares me the most is he says he feels like he is dying! wtf! I guess my question is if you are diabetic when did keeping your sugar under control become harder and does any of what is going on with the hubby sound familiar to you. his blood pressure ,triglycerides, and weight are all good also the last time we were at the doctor his A1C score was a 6.5. Any idea what is going on?

    • ANSWER:
      Sometimes diabetes doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. Take those mornings that your husband wakes up with blood glucose that’s higher than it was when he went to sleep. You’d think that not eating for those seven or eight hours would give him a lower blood glucose.

      The dawn phenomenon is a natural rise in blood glucose between the hours of 4:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., and it occurs because of hormonal changes in the body.

      Treatment for dawn phenomenon depends on how he treat his diabetes. If he take insulin, he may be able to adjust his dosing so that peak action occurs closer to the morning rise in his blood glucose. If he has type 2, diabetes pills provide options as well adding Metformin as it aids the liver.

      The Somogyi effect, named for researcher Michael Somogyi, PhD, who studied and first described it, is his body’s response to a low that he had while he was sleeping. The body responds to those hormones by raising blood glucose—sometimes too much.

      He would treat this the opposite way of how he would treat dawn phenomenon. He could have a snack before he goes to sleep or reduce his insulin infusion at night. If he takes NPH, he can switch to an insulin that won’t dip him down at 3:00 a.m. It’s a good idea to check his blood glucose if he wakes up sweating or with headaches, as those are signs of a low.

      Sometimes his insulin just runs out or wears off. Then it’s a matter of him and his doctor adjusting his insulin regimen accordingly. If it’s insulin waning, he could look at splitting your basal insulin or taking it at a different time of the day. If he takes NPH at supper, he could move it closer to bedtime.

      Before he and his doctor can adjust his diet or medications to handle high morning blood glucose he has to know what’s the culprit. There’s one simple way: Check his blood glucose at 3:00 a.m. for several nights in a row. You need to see where his blood glucose is at bedtime, at 3:00 a.m., and in the morning. If his blood glucose is fairly even between bedtime and 3:00 a.m., but then rises between 3:00 a.m. and morning, chances are he’s experiencing dawn phenomenon.
      If his blood glucose is low at 3:00 a.m., he’s most likely experiencing the Somogyi effect.
      If his blood glucose is higher at 3:00 a.m. than at bedtime and higher still in the morning, his insulin is probably waning or not working properly.

      His having diabetes, chances are he’ll experience the occasional high morning blood glucose. That’s not something to fret about too much. But if it happens regularly, then it’s time to call your doctor. He should also suspect a problem when his morning blood glucose is the highest of the day, and when it is consistently high for the rest of the day after that. If it’s significant, it should be dealt with because those who have high blood glucose in the morning tend to have high blood glucose all day, so its important to seek his doctor’s care and have him/her get your husband’s blood sugars stabilized in order to prevent diabetic complications– try to do this as soon as you can.

      Hope this helps.

  27. QUESTION:
    are you struggling with type 2 diabetes?
    i was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 3 years ago. for the first years i struggles to control it with diet before the doctor gave me metformin. the metformin gave me acute upset tummy and i have struggled for 2 years with it.
    then i came across a book saying i could reverse my diabetes. so i thought… i have nothing to loose. My sugar was peaking at between 30 and 32.

    The book explained that type 2 diabetics hold fat molecules in their muscle cells. it is these fat molecules that stop the body from using the insulin it produces.

    the solution it seems is easy. If your body holds on to fat molecules then don’t put fat into your body.

    so 2 weeks ago i started a vegan diet. 1 week into my new diet and i had a check up with my nurse.
    my normally high blood pressure was totally normal for the first time in 3 years. my sugar level has almost halved and was peaking at 17.
    i weighed in over 12 lb lighter than i had previously.

    on week later (2 weeks into my new lifestyle) my sugar is peaking at 7.9, i am (according to my nintendo wii) 6 lb lighter than i was this time last week and i have so much more energy than i have had in years.

    the book said give it a month. i have reversed my diabetes in 2 weeks.

    i don’t feel like i am on a diet, actually im not on a diet i have just stopped eating meat and dairy products. i love cooking with spices and i have discovered tofu and lentils.

    really people… i don’t get that if it is so simple to do then why are doctors not recommending this to everyone

    • ANSWER:
      Your numbers are a little exaggerated . 32 is very close to US numbers of 600. I doubt that you would have survived for 2 years with these numbers.
      Besides it not possible to really control if you are eating tons of carbs.

      Nice story though !

      Tin

  28. QUESTION:
    Could this be a diabetes warning, Some thing else, or Nothing at all? (Also Pregnant)?
    What it is:
    I’ve been feeling like I have a fever (tired eyes, cold things almost feel weird to touch, and my skins chilled but the inside of me feels hot) but my temp is just fine. Also I’ve been having this Vertigo-ish type feeling, not necessarily dizzy, but like, slight dizzyness mixed in with a feeling that i just can’t seem to focus my eyes right. I’ve heard a few diabetics talk about this, And Diabetes runs rampant through both sides of my family, Here’s another reason I worry

    During my first pregnancy when they make you drink all that glucose stuff to see if you have diabetes, If you throw up or your sugar level goes high, it’s supposed to mean that you very well may have it. I did throw up, but the nurse didn’t have the time to retest so I never got accurate results. (Granted I also had Hypermesis but had it under control at the time) During labor my blood pressure dropped low enough that they had to give me medication, and I was super cold. I always seem to be cold now, even when everyone else is warm

    Some people have told me it could be a blood pressure problem too, or just simply the fact that I never drink water (Though I have started to now that I found out I am preggo with little one number 2) And it could be really bad dehydration. Any Thoughts? I’m 21.
    Some nurses actually do come on here, but I’m only asking for opinions. And thank you to everyone who answered me honestly.
    Also, I’m about 2 months in with #2

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same symptoms early in both my pregnancies. Though my doctor thought it was due to Gestational Diabetes, I tested out only borderline with my first. I too have Type II in my family as well. It was found to be caused by my high blood pressure. Though it went away around the 5 month with my first and the 2nd month with my second. I would go back and have them test you again for the 3 hour and explain to them you need to drink much slower than the 5 minute allotment. Sometimes having to drink that pure sugar crap is just too hard for pregnant women. I got so ill but managed to keep it down the 2 times they made me do it.

  29. QUESTION:
    What is a good diabetic meal plan for a 35 year old diabetic man ?
    Please help me out. I need to know the answers to these questions but i dont have the book because i cant afford it for class :(

    Your client is a 35 year old male diabetic who maintains his weight and controls his blood glucose levels on 2600 calories a day. His usual eating pattern is:
    breakfast:3 starch, 1 fruit, 2 milk, 2 meat
    lunch: 3 starch, 2 fruit, 2 veggie. 3 ,meat
    snack: 2 starch, 1 fruit, 2 meat
    dinner: 3 starch, 2 veggie, 4 meat
    bedtime snack: 2 starch, 1 fruit, 1 meat

    2. use table D-1 in the appendix of your textbook to determine the grams of carbohydrate in each meal and his total grams for the day.

    3. how many of his calories should come from carbohydrates each day (use the AMDR range for carb of %45-65%)

    4. Hiw many grams of carbohydrates should he consume each day (use your answer from question 3)

    5. Does his usual eating pattern contribute more or less carbohydrate than what he should consume?

    6. Diabetics’ carbohydrate intake should be evenly distributed throughout the day to help maintain constant blood glucose levels. How would you adjust his eating patter to attain a more even distribution of carbohydrate?

    7. Develop a 1-day meal plan for this client by translating his usual eating pattern into food choices (use appendix D for serving sizes and foods in each food group.)

    8. If he is hungrier than usual but does not want to increase his blood sugar levels by going over his “allowed” carbohydrate levels, what are three foods he could safely eat?
    dinner: 3 starch

    • ANSWER:
      That is FAR too much starch for a diabetic. Bet this guy’s blood sugar levels are well above safe levels.

      He should be checking his blood sugar to see what a safe level of carbohydrate is.

      Fruits are pure sugar and will raise blood sugar just like starch.