Fasting Blood Sugar Level Chart

The level of blood sugar in the body is closely related to healthy functioning of the human system. Imbalances in the blood sugar can lead to many problems such as obesity, diabetes or binge eating. A good way to treat this imbalance is to take on foods to manipulate blood glucose levels. These foods help to lower blood glucose and maintain it at a healthy rate.

Come visit us right here for more Diabetic Diet Info and get a Diabetes Blood Glucose Ebook What Is High Blood Sugar. http://www.diabeticdietbloodglucose.com/

Oatmeal is one of those carbohydrates that are high in fiber. The high fiber content helps to slow down the rate of digestion. The reason being because the courage takes more time to process the nutrients and carbohydrate from the fiber content. As a result there is a slow and consistent release of glucose from the oatmeal. Consequently you will eat less and may be able to shed pounds too. Other high fiber whole grains like barley are also effective which assists in controlling the level of blood glucose.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    blood sugar level/glucose?
    well a doctor said i should buy a diabeties meter as she thinks im fasting glucose or something like that,not sure if it makes sense as i couldnt understand her much.Whats the best times of testing myself? like before meals or after ?? does anyone have some advice and maybe even some sort of chart i could print out and write my results in as iv googled this but there all so confuseing!

    • ANSWER:
      Normal Fasting Blood Sugar
      A normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is:

      83 mg/dl (4.6 mmol/L) or less.

      Many normal people have fasting blood sugars in the mid and high 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) range.

      Though most doctors will tell you any fasting blood sugar under 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) is “normal”, there are several studies that suggest that testing with a fasting blood sugar in the mid 90 mg/dl (5 mmol/L) range often predicts diabetes that is diagnosed a decade later.
      Post-Meal Blood Sugar (Postprandial)
      Independent of what they eat, the blood sugar of a truly normal person is:

      Under 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L) one or two hours after a meal.

      Most normal people are under 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) two hours after eating.

      To learn more about diabetes >http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/index.php

      Good luck

      Tin

  2. QUESTION:
    Testing sugar levels. What is diabetic and what is not?
    A nurse at hospital tested by blood sugar levels when i was fasting and after. The nurse said 2 to 4 was a normal level for someone who didn’t have diabetes and had been fasting. Is this accurate?
    My tested levels are below…
    - Fasting Blood Sugar levels were 4.9
    - After eating blood sugar levels were 5.4
    Is there some sort of chart i can refer to? I want to know if i have diabetes or not. (I have PCOS which is a pre-diabetic condition).

    • ANSWER:
      Hi El,

      That is a perfect result sweetheart considering you have PCOS. Nothing to worry about there.

      I have been trying to find a site to help you, the best one I have come up with so far is www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/16422495.php
      If you scroll down to the heading NORMAL FASTING BLOOD SUGAR everything below that heading will explain the normal ranges of blood sugar to you.

      Hope this helps.

      Love Mel.X

  3. QUESTION:
    I hid my sugar levels from my doctor, now what?
    I’m a gestational diabetic. That means I’m pregnant. I’m six months in, and I had not been keeping track of my blood sugar at all. I didn’t realize how bad it actually was. I filled in my blood sugar chart the day of my appointment (yesterday), but I used fake reasonable numbers. The doctor alluded to the fact that he knew my numbers were too good to be true, but he wasn’t going to outright accuse me of lying. Well, I had been putting fasting levels between 70 and 89. I did an actual check this morning, and it was actually 153. I have to come clean to my doctors, but I don’t know how to do it gracefully. I screwed up.

    • ANSWER:
      Boy , this is tough.
      Seem to be a trait with many diabetics.
      If it was I that told the fib, I think I would go to another doctor. I would feel so ashamed.
      I am not berating you, what is done is done.

      How Diabetes and Pregnancy May Affect Baby

      A common problem among the babies of pregnant diabetic women is a condition called “macrosomia,” which means “large body.” In other words, babies of diabetic women are apt to be considerably larger than others.

      This occurs because many of these babies receive too much sugar via the placenta because their mothers have high blood sugar levels. The baby’s pancreas senses the high sugar levels and it produces more insulin in an attempt to use up all the extra sugar. That extra sugar is converted to fat, making a large baby.
      What are the risks?
      Research has found that pregnant women with diabetes are five times more likely to have stillborn babies. Babies whose mothers have diabetes are:

      •three times more likely to die within four weeks of birth
      •twice as likely to have a serious birth defect

      Insulin is the traditional first-choice drug for blood glucose control during pregnancy, because it is the most effective for fine-tuning blood glucose and it doesn’t cross the placenta. Therefore, it is safe for the baby. Insulin can be injected with a syringe, an insulin pen, or through an insulin pump. All three methods are safe for pregnant women.

      Take care

      Buff

  4. QUESTION:
    Why are there so many different “normal” blood levels for a non-diabetic? Its getting very confusing..?
    The American Diabetes Assoc. and other reputable medical resources (including the info on the chart for the meter strips) say a non-diabetic’s normal fasting (8-12 hrs) blood sugar level should be below 100. Anything above that is considered “pre” or “diabetic” depending on what your level is. The most confusing part is the BG level for approx 2 hours after a meal. I keep reading you should be under 120, 2 hours after a meal. Meanwhile, Doctors and the ADA say anything under 140 is normal, to me that seems like a big diff. I have been testing my after lunch and dinner BG levels , I have been averaging between 94 and 129 after 2 hrs..according to some this is perfectly normal (140), while others are saying I should not be going over 120…Does this mean I am at High Risk for diabetes? Are people saying my BG level should always be below 120?.. My morning Fasting has been between 81-98 for 8 consecutive days now, what does this mean???..please help.. Thanks…

    • ANSWER:
      Forget what the ADA says. They are in the pockets of drug companies.

      Here is the scoop( we want to catch this terrible disease in it’s earliest monent, Don’t we???)

      Normal Fasting Blood Sugar
      A normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is:

      83 mg/dl (4.6 mmol/L) or less.

      Many normal people have fasting blood sugars in the mid and high 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) range.

      Though most doctors will tell you any fasting blood sugar under 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) is “normal”, there are several studies that suggest that testing with a fasting blood sugar in the mid 90 mg/dl (5 mmol/L) range often predicts diabetes that is diagnosed a decade later.
      Post-Meal Blood Sugar (Postprandial)
      Independent of what they eat, the blood sugar of a truly normal person is:

      Under 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L) one or two hours after a meal.

      Most normal people are under 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) two hours after eating.
      A1c
      A truly normal A1c is between 4.6% and 5.4%

      A1cs are not as good a measure of actual blood sugar control in individuals as they are for groups. An A1c of 5.1% maps to an average blood sugar of 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) or less when group statistics are analyzed, but normal variations in how our red blood cells work make the A1cs of truly normal individuals fall into a wider range.

      Some people’s A1cs are always a bit higher than their measured blood sugars would predict. Some are always lower. NOTE: If you are anemic your A1c will read much lower than your actual blood sugars and the resulting A1c is not a useful gauge of your actual blood sugar control.

      Heart attack risk rises in a straight line fashion as A1c rises from 4.6%. Take care Buff

      You are probably on the verge. So start a low glycemic index diet and exercise,(http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm)

      Exercise is Daily 30 t0 60 min. a day. By the way this is a great way for the whole family to eat, No calorie counting.

  5. QUESTION:
    Any Metformin experts?
    First of all, thanks for taking the trouble to read and answer these questions. I really appreciate it. I am a newly diagnosed diabetic (about 6 or 7 weeks ago) and I really need some answers to these questions:

    As a background to this question, my fasting blood sugar when diagnosed was 20 UK (= 360 US). I have tested it myself a couple of times this week when fasting and it was 13.1 (=236) and 15.8 (=284) but it has also been 19.8 (=356) an hour after a meal.

    (1) When should I take metformin – before, during or after a meal and why? I have heard some conflicting things.

    (2) I have been prescribed 3 x 500mg but I very rarely eat three large meals. In fact, I eat about 5 or 6 half size meals so would it be okay for me to halve the dosage and double the frequency? i.e. does it depend on how much I actually eat?

    (3) What is Metformin actually doing? (i.e. how does it actually work)

    (4) Is the effect of Metformin simply a short term remedy in as much as, does it simply lower my blood sugar momentarily or should I expect to see a long term reduction in my fasting blood sugar?

    (5) If I dont feel that Metformin is doing much then should I consider asking for the Slow Release version? Or should I consider going onto Insulin?

    (6) Are there websites with charts etc which show how blood sugar levels should be on a typical day when meals are taken and when Metformin/Insulin are taken?

    Once again, thanks
    I am type 2, and I am male, aged 42, with both parents Indian.

    • ANSWER:
      You seem to have several problesm,all related.

      1) ALWAYS FOLLOW DOCTORS ORDRS. Do not depend on advice from the intenet. CALL THE DOCTOR and ask. DO NOT attempt to treat yoursefl, adjust your own disages, or otherwise self-medicate. DO NOT use any folk” or herbal remedies, as they can interfer with teh prescription drugs..

      2) You should take readings ONLY as indicated by the doctor. The most commen times are:
      –> Just before (like 5 minutes before) meals
      –> Just before bed
      Some doctoar also recommend taking a reading TWO HOURS after eating.

      NEVER TAKE A READING AT ANY OTHER TIME. Your blood sugar “spikes” immediately after you eat, and so readings taken sooner than two hours after eating WILL be high, and are meaningless.

      NOW:
      Metformin is to be taken WITH MEALS, unless the doctor orders otherwise. One of the things a diabetic MUST do is control their eating habits. you need to start eating in a more prescribed, regular manner, like THREE meals a day, at the normal times.

      DO NOT cut the pill! Metformin must be taken whole, not chewed, crushed, or cut..

      Metformin works by 1) Causing the liver to produce less excess sugar, and 2) Increase the body’s sensitiveity to insulin, thus lowering blood sugar.

      Metformin works almost immedately, but its effect will act as long as the chemical stays in the body. That is why it is necesary to properly time your meals!

      It is not about what YOU feel is working or not; it is about what the doctor PROVES is working or not, through regular blood tests. The doctor is the one to make the judgement whether ot not to use the XR version ogfmetformin.

      But, there are other medications to try before going to insulin. Metformin works for Insulin Resistence. but you might have Insulin Deficiency. Therefor, you need drugs that will stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin. These drugs may be tried alone or in combination with metformin.

      Only if NONE of the drugs work should you consider insulin.

      There is no ned for a Blood Glucose chart. The reading are very simple to undetstand.

      1) ALWAYS take the readings at the correct times (see above). Raeding taken at ANY other time are meaningless.
      2) blood sugar readings taken just before meals or bed should be in the NORMAL range, 80-120 US
      3) Reading taken two hous after the meals should be in the range of 150-200 US

      However you obtain these result is OK, so long as it works. Diet and exercise, Metformin, or insulin — all are OK.

      the goal of diabetes treatment is to train the patient to take control of his or her life, teaching them to STRICTLY control their diet, get more exercise, and lose weight. If this can be successfully accomplished, the drugs and/or insulin can be reduced or even eliminated.

      BUT NOTE::
      If the patient remains “non-compliant” (not following doctors orders, ESPECIALLY so far as strict dietary control is concerned) then there is no doctor in the world, no medication yet invented, that can save the patients life.

      Diabetes is an EXTREMELY personal disease. It requires a great deal of self-discipline to fight it. The successful patient will live as long and as happy as a “healthy” person.

      The non-compliant patient will often die young, and almost always painfully, being subject to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart attacks, strokes, blindness, Azheimers disease, amputations, kidneys disease, and dialysis.

  6. QUESTION:
    Do I have diabetes or am I just being paranoid?
    Hello everybody. I apologize in advance because this will prolly look like an essay by the time i’m done. I’m a 21 yr old male. 5’6″ 185 lbs. I do alot of cardio and weight training. I’m a little overweight but in no way obese. I don’t really have a family history of diabetes. I do however consume an abundant amount of carbs and sugar a day. Anyways, about 2 weeks ago I started feeling extremely thirsty. It seemed like no matter how much water I’d drink, I would still feel thirsty. It felt like the inside of my body was evaporating. I did some research to see what can possibly be causing this and the first thing that came up was diabetes. I freaked out and automatically diagnosed myself with having diabetes. I didn’t tell my parents because I didn’t want to worry them. Unfortunately over the past week I developed a few more symptoms, an increase in appetite, urinating more frequently, and a tingly sensation in my hands and feet (Only happens when my hands and feet are in a certain position like when my feet are crossed). After those symptoms came about, I knew I needed to be checked out. However since I don’t have a doctor because I just moved to Florida from NY 2 months ago, I went to the hospital. I explained my symptoms to the doctor and told her my fear of possibly having diabetes. She took my blood pressure, temperature, 8 tubes of blood and a urinalysis (I knew they were going to take my blood to check my sugar, so the day before so I took it upon myself to fast. I fasted for about 14-15 hrs) Finally after waiting about 30 min, the doctor came in and told me the results. She said my blood pressure and urinalysis were normal, and that my sugar level of 106 was normal and did not indicate any diabetes. I was extremely relieved and i asked her if it’s possible for my symptoms to be nothing or just all in my mind brought on by paranoia. She said yes. Now when I got home i was curious as to what a sugar level would have to read to indicate diabetes. So i came across a chart that states for a fasting blood sugar of 126 or higher usually means a person has diabetes, 100-125 is pre-diabetes, with 80-99 considered normal. My reading was 106; So according to the chart I have pre-diabetes. If that’s true then why didn’t my doctor tell me this, why did she say it was normal? Is it? I’m totally freaking out right now because according to her i don’t have diabetes yet i still feel all of these symptoms. Is it possible that it’s all in my head? I mean i am constantly thinking about diabetes, so maybe my mind is convinced i have it and is creating these symptoms to cope with it. Also could it be because i just moved to Florida from NY. and i’m just adjusting?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you are being paranoid. Everyones blood sugar goes up and down, and what is normal for one person is not normal for another person. Charts are made to give us a number to compare things by, it does not mean that if your readings are different than the chart, that you have diabetes. It also depends on when you do your readings. A non diabetic should have reading somewhere in the neighborhood of 70 to 99 fasting and 70 to 140 two hours after a meal.. If your doctor would have thought there was reason to tell you that you are a diabetic, she would have. The symptoms you have could be from a lot of things, especially your tingling sensations…they were most likely caused because your feet were crossed…that is normal. I think you are fine and are obsessing with certain symptoms. You said your appetite has increased, that may be why you have been drinking more. Put away the charts.. Let it go and go have fun.

  7. QUESTION:
    I have no idea what is wrong with me?
    I have not been feeling well for the past four months. I have menstruation problems, stomach problems, and I am always tired. I have been diagnosed with IBS, but nothing seems to help that. I recently have been tested for many different problems including diabetes, hyperthyroidism, estrogen levels, testosterone levels, progesterone levels, UTI, kidney problems, blood count…etc. The problem with these tests are that I go to military doctors. They don’t give the results back unless something is way off the charts. I have tested my blood sugar and it has been between 190-250 every time ( the last time I did fasting sugar level and it was 234)…could I possibly be diabetic, or do these symptoms sound like something different.
    Any information would be helpful.

    • ANSWER:
      Diabetic and gluten intolerant. Do the research.

      If you would like to try a product that is inexpensive check out chia seeds that dr oz was talking about. Exercise and eat a gluten free diet for 3 months and see if you feel better. No diet soad or regular and no energy drinks. Your so right about your problem being diabetes! Congratualtions for being smarter than the DR.

  8. QUESTION:
    I have to be re-tested for Gestational diabetes, but I tend to be more hypoglycemic when I’m not pregnant.?
    I have to go back to the lab for the 3 hr glucose test to see if my higher level of blood sugar is because to gestational diabetes. I know that not everyone who get retested has it, but I’m wondering if its linked to my history of what I would assume (never diagnosed) is hypoglycemia: faintness, headache, tiredness, dizziness, shaking, and irritability when having not eaten or when I eat too much sugar or simple carbohydrates. I’ve always been considered underweight, or just low on the BMI chart. This is my fourth pregnancy and the other three times I was fine. This time the only difference is they told me not to fast before the test, something I had done the three previous times. Do you think there could be a link to that? Has anyone with these symptoms when they’re not pregnant ever tested high on their glucose test? Or can anyone answer if there is a link between these symptoms and how I reacted during the test.

    • ANSWER:
      Hypoglycemic is low blood glucose. You won’t have that if you’ve had too much sugar or simple carbs.
      Also, when I’m hyperglycemic (too high blood glucose) I’ll have the symptoms you describe. So, I imagine you have had a high blood glucose reading and that’s why they want to test you under ‘normal’ conditions to see how you’re reacting to higher glucose levels.

      Being male, I’ve not experienced pregnancy, but I have eperienced high and low blood glucose levels. As long as your doctor is on top of it, you should be fine.

  9. QUESTION:
    Do you think I have gestational Diabetes?
    Went and had my GD test today, A 2 hour one, Firstly they took blood than I drank the sweet drink an hour later they took more blood than an hour after that they took more blood. Before I drank the sweet drink the lady tested the blood and compared it to some sort of colour chart and she said my sugar levels were quite high (9 exactly). I also fasted for this test, 10 hrs prior (except for water did drink that). Do you think this means I have GD or could I have a high sugar level reading without having GD?

    Go get my results from the doctor next week, just curious and want to know what others think and may have experienced. Really hope I don’t have it, have had MASSIVE cravings for any thing sweet, it’s torture I just want to eat a million mars bars, LOL.

    Thanks in advance ladies.

    • ANSWER:
      Try not to worry till u get the results back I’m not sure how they tested your blood, but the usual prick test normal is 4-7 so if you got a 9 you would be slightly high but not In a coma!!!
      My mother had GD think hers were around 20 when they tested her which is high. She has now got type 2 diabetes the finger prick test is what she uses every day. Usually the hospital will take blood from your arm so they can do a full blood count and check your haemoglobin levels at the same time. Hope u r ok let us know how u get on x
      By the way my GTT results were 4.7 before and 4.7 afterwards to give u an idea x

  10. QUESTION:
    Do you think I have gestational diabetes?
    Went and had my GD test yesterday, A 2 hour one, Firstly they took blood than I drank the sweet drink an hour later they took more blood than an hour after that they took more blood. Before I drank the sweet drink the lady tested the blood and compared it to some sort of colour chart and she said my sugar levels were quite high (9 exactly). I also fasted for this test, 10 hrs prior (except for water did drink that). Do you think this means I have GD or could I have a high sugar level reading without having GD?

    Go get my results from the doctor next week, just curious and want to know what others think and may have experienced. Really hope I don’t have it, have had MASSIVE cravings for any thing sweet, it’s torture I just want to eat a million mars bars, LOL.

    Thanks in advance ladies.

    • ANSWER:
      Having been a type 1 diabetic for 25 years and now 34 weeks pregnant, I can tell you that 9.0 is really quite high especially after fasting and before having the sweet drink. Your level should be at 5.3 for a non diabetic person. I would say that they probably will diagnose you with GD however will probably try to control it with diet first and then if that doesn’t work, they will put you in the care of an endocrinologist and put you on insulin injections until the baby is born. The needles are very small and its really not that bad. PLEASE stay away from eating excess sugar as this will make your baby grow larger than it should be. Try eating things that taste sweet but are not, including fruit, yogurt etc. Good luck.